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Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

San Antonio, Texas
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Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

Hi,

The Eiffel Tower website says that people with reduced mobility cannot access the top floor of the Tower. My son has trouble with stairs, but is not in a wheelchair, so I'm wondering if he could still go up. Are there stairs involved? If not, does anyone know the reason that they state people with reduced mobility can't access the top floor.

Also, there is a reduced price ticket for 1st and 2nd levels. It says you have to produce a "disability card". I'm guessing this would only appy to EU residents, since such a thing doesn't exist in the United States? Are there any US visitors out there that have been able to take advantage of the disabled rate?

Thanks in advance for all help.

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Tampa, Florida
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1. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

the very top floor of the tower is actually 2 levels - there's one level just as you exit the lifts; then there are two sets of relatively steep stairs to the very upper level. There is no other access to the very upper level - it's stair-access only.

You can certainly get a birds-eye view from the lower level; it's glassed, so it's more pleasant if it's nasty weather, anyway.

Sorry, but I can't help with your other questions.

Edited: 14 March 2013, 22:49
Paris, France
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2. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

The emergency escape route for the summit involves a small spiral staircase outdoors. This obviously excludes wheelchairs, as well as people who have trouble with stairs (and people with any trace of a fear of heights, but that's a separate issue). The wider, straight staircases at lower levels could accommodate rescuers carrying people who cannot walk, but not the staircase from the summit, which is strictly single-file. I believe this is the reason for the restrictions on the summit.

The disability card most likely means one issued by the French government. The French government issues cards to certify everything (disabilities, age, retirement, etc.), and without a card, it doesn't matter how disabled a person actually is.

Los Angeles
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3. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

A person who has trouble with mobility (such as walking on regular ground) probably wants to avoid the stairs at the top of the tower - but no one will stop that person (there's no mechanism for ascertaining the degree of disability).

Let your son take it as he sees it. I have some mobility problems myself and use a walking stick. I went to the top (just once, won't do it again soon - had to apportion out my stairs that day), but I have no way of comparing my problems to your sons'. My nephew (with two braces and very severe mobility problems) still made it to the top of El Capitan in Yosemite (much harder than the Eiffel Tower).

But yes, it's stairs and that's why they say it's not wheelchair accessible.

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Traralgon, Australia
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4. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

So I'm taking my other half from Australia to London, he's never been outside of the UK, he is in a wheelchair due to Cerebral Palsy, does this mean he can't go up the tower at all? I want a day trip to Paris on the Eurostar for him, surprise trip.

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London
London
England, UK
Paris
Paris
Ile-de-France, France
Paris, France
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5. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

The topic here was about going to the top (3rd platform). There's no problem for wheelchair access to 1st and 2nd platform. From the FAQ: "Are people in wheelchairs able to access the Tower? - Yes, up until the second floor. For security reasons, they are not able to access the top." http://www.tour-eiffel.fr/en/faq.html

IMO, going to the top isn't really worth it, except for saying "I've been there" : it's more expensive, there's very often a long waiting line and the viewing comfort is better from level 2; photo opportunities are also better on the 2nd platform, because there's usually less haze and more details on the monuments, houses, etc. Just my 2 euro cents....

Traralgon, Australia
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6. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

Thank you! :-) My twin has been to Paris but I didn't see the point, i'm only going to take my partner as a surprise for him. Thanks again.

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Paris
Paris
Ile-de-France, France
Florida
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7. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

If none of you make it to the top of the Eiffel, don't feel too badly. It is very high up and the view is much farther 'away' but far less interesting than the 2nd level.

Los Angeles
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8. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

Totally agree, Travelnutty. And since it's mostly elevators for most people, it's not like climbing it can be compared to, say, Mount Everest. It's a big tower. You can see great views of broader Paris many places.

But the Tower itself, especially when on the ground, is rather impressive. I had no idea it was so...big.

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Paris
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New Hampshire
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9. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

I'm another who agrees that the second level is the very best for view and photo ops and that, unless for bragging rights, it's really not necessary to bother with the Summit, particularly since the elevators are smaller (and usually crammed with, often less than considerate,people) with long queues in both directions.

New Hampshire
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10. Re: Eiffel Tower - Disabled Access

I'm another who agrees that the second level is the very best for view and photo ops and that, unless for bragging rights, it's really not necessary to bother with the Summit, particularly since the elevators are smaller (and usually crammed with, often less than considerate,people) with long queues in both directions.