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Our 'last supper' in Paris

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Our 'last supper' in Paris

I have read so many restaurant reviews that I might be able to quote the menus. Ha. That being said, our last night in Paris (which is also the last night of our 2 week trip to Europe) is also my husbands 55th birthday. I am looking for more of a cozy, casual restaurant for dinner, with authentic food, however we have a few picky eaters with us. We are bringing our children, ages 26, 23, 22 and 15 with us for our 30th wedding anniversary. Please don't ask me why. Ha.

I feel like the family will be fine dining in Italy, and in Spain, but that France might pose more of a challenge for us when dining. None of us are experts on or even very familiar with French food, so I am in a bit of a quandary.

Any thoughts?

Thank you in advance!

Broadford, Australia
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1. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

Hi,

It's your anniversary and your husband's birthday. Pick somewhere YOU like and enjoy it.

The rest of your family can surely find something on a French bistro menu to eat -steak-frites for instance.

Otherwise spend a lovely night a deux and send the rest of them to McDonalds.

French food is really not that challenging, IMO.

Have a great night!

Cheers,

UF

PARIS
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2. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

Hey jb!

Can we ask where you are staying??

Chicago, Illinois
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3. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

a bistrot like Josephine Chez Dumonet will have things like steak frittes for the unadventurous -- they also have a wonderful beouf Bourguignon and great dessert souflets -- or given their ages, this would be a great night to send them off to eat on their own and to choose something upscale for yourselves. you can look at menus on line for many places and I think you will find that the typical French menu is not that much of a challenge.

A cozy place where we have really great food a couple of times is La Cordonnerie near the Tuilleries in Arr 1

A place we love in Montmartre a couple blocks from Lamarck Caulaincourt metro is Cottage Marcadet.

Les Ombres has the spectacular view through the roof to the Eiffel Tower and we had an excellent meal there.

It is located atop the Musee Quai Branley and needs a reservation well in advance for dinner -- the others need reservations but a few days will probably be enough.

Any of these would have food that is well presented, French and tasty and not particularly strange to an American taste.

Edited: 13 July 2013, 15:37
Paris, France
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4. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

One of the big traditional Paris brasseries would be casual and ofter a very wide variety of choice on the menu... and many of them are even economical. After you have walked around Paris for a few days, I am certain that you will have spotted several places that will fit the bill, without requiring reservations more than half a day in advance if at all.

Chicago, Illinois
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5. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

if all 6 of you are going to eat -- then a reservation a day or so in advance is prudent

Vancouver, Canada
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6. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

Kids the age of your will have no problem with French food. If they can survive the Spanish fare, they'll enjoy the French.

Val-de-Marne, France
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7. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

I am intrigued. Are your kids familiar with Spanish and Italian foods but not French foods? The reason I ask is because when I was living in the US (I assume based on your travel map that's where you are from) I heard many Americans refer to Mexican food as "Spanish food" and most "Italian" restaurants in the US serve dishes that are unheard of in Italy (they are Americanized versions of southern Italian and Sicilian recipes that bear no resemblance with what is found is northern Italy for instance).

I don't know where in Spain and Italy you are going but Spanish and Italian foods are full of "weird" /unusual (to American palates) meats including organ meats, fish with the head on and eyes staring at you, etc :) No more or less than in France and just as easy to avoid if you don't like that but Paris will seem very sedate in terms of food "adventure" compared to the many regional cuisines of France, Italy and Spain.

Is this the type of Spanish and Italian cuisine your kids are familiar with?

www.lonelyplanet.com/usa/restaurants/spanish

www.aboutflorence.com/florentine-cuisine.html

In any case, don't worry, there's food for everyone, from the most to the least adventurous eaters in Paris. Have a great anniversary!

Paris, France
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8. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

Actually I was thinking exactly the same as Mrs FM. Authentic Italian and Spanish food is quite rare in the United States. But there are so many totally international dishes that span the world that frankly I cannot imagine having trouble eating in any big city, certainly not Paris which caters to the greatest number of international visitors in the world.

Vancouver, Canada
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9. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

The Spanish dishes you will be seeing in Spain are not your "hispanic" dishes from the Mexican restaurants in the US. Totally different flavours and depending on where you are going in Spain quite different in approach. Your kids are quite grown up and surely computer savvy. It would be a great help if they do cuisine research. You have oodles of information from food blogs and I'd read up (or they should read up) on them: ie. Patricia Wells's, ParisbyMouth, Hungry for Paris. And for Italian: parlafoods.com and theromedigest, elizabethminchillirome, etc.

You don't say where you are domiciled: but visiting a French restaurant at home "may" be a good intro to dining in France.

Paris, France
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10. Re: Our 'last supper' in Paris

One thing that almost always works with kids is telling them "I bet that you would never dare to eat ...x..." (lamb; intestines, snails, a fish with the head on)