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How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

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Dallas, Texas
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How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

I read most of the thread about teens traveling by themselves. My 16yo daughter will be traveling over to Paris from Texas, accompanied by her 27yo sister. My husband and I will already be in Europe, and will meet them in Paris (this will be in mid-June).

Do I need to notarize some document that big sis can carry in case someone questions if she is allowed to take her sister out of the country? This is something that had not occurred to me, but I don't want them to have any surprises en route.

San Diego...
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1. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

A couple of things that I've had to do as a personal assistant to employers in similar situation:

1) Have you and your husband write a letter (brief - a few lines) giving permission for the older sibling to take the younger out of the country. It may never be read but better to be safe than sorry.

2) In that same letter in a seperate paragraph also give your permission that in case of a medical emergency you give the older sibling your permission to authorize medical treatment for the younger one.

3) Include your contact information in Paris.

So, in total 3 short paragraphs. And, yes, I would sign the letter in front of a notary.

Edited: 01 February 2014, 05:22
Illinois
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2. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

I would. Better safe than sorry. And adding the consent for medical treatment is a good idea too.

Paris, France
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3. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

Exactly what elizzie said.

And it would be a good idea to make certain the older sister knows who to call and/or where to go in the event of a health emergency. Not likely to happen, but that would be one less thing to worry about.

Paris, France
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4. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

I meant to add this: It would be a good idea to get the notarized document translated into French - this should also be notarized. France being...well, France - you never know when that will be required.

Dallas, Texas
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5. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

Thank you! We will take care of that before we leave.

Montelimar, France
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6. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

France is much more lenient on this subject.

As a matter of facts,French kids can now travel unaccompanied and without written authorisation from their parents; just a passport (or ID in Schengen) .

So I guess there is no need for a translation when your daughter travels with her adult sister.

…service-public.fr/particuliers/F1359.xhtml

Los Angeles
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7. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

Here's a form provided by AAA:

www.aaa.com/aaa/006/travel/Minor_Consent.pdf

Students of mine travel out of the country *all the time* with younger siblings and no parents and no one has ever gotten anything notarized in the various languages of the places to which they are traveling, but I suppose you could, to be on the safe side. A regular notarized copy in English will do.

This is, after all, only going to be an issue in the airports - once the kid is reunited with the parents, it's no different than any other family traveling to France. People in airports know what to do with notarized documents from other nations, IME.

Well, except some places in the United States. My daughter's birth certificate is from New Mexico, which caused several problems for her back in California and in some other states too (Arizona, I'm lookin' at you).

Edited: 01 February 2014, 23:18
San Diego...
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8. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

I was thinking the same thing about the translation but since I have no knowledge of these issues in France I didn't say anything.

The only thing that I know about is to cover what might happen from the time they depart their home in the US, travel to the airport, get on an airplane and arrive in another country. What is needed in that country I don't know. I do know that I never did have any of these papers translated into other languages. Right or wrong? I don't know.

Edited: 01 February 2014, 23:38
Los Angeles
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9. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

They are only going to ask for the passport, IMO. No one knows the relationship of an adult flying with a child nor are notarized copies of birth certificates required. Both parents should sign the authorization, btw. TSA *may* check to see if parents have authorized travel if children appear to be traveling with only one parent/adult. I have heard of cruise lines checking, and one airline checking (stateside).

So which ever parent is not traveling should sign the form for the other parent to travel with the children (as I did when my ex took the kids out of the country) and both parents should sign if another adult is taking someone 17 or under.

If anyone has ever had their paperwork checked at the destination (particularly France), I'd be interested to hear about it.

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10. Re: How about a teen traveling with her much older sister?

LeB - <<No one knows the relationship of an adult flying with a child nor are notarized copies of birth certificates required.>>

Unless I missed it I don't see that anyone said that a notarized copy of a Birth Certificate is required. The only thing that I've mentioned and that I see that others have mentioned is a 'letter of consent' should be signed and notarized. Nothing more.

And further in your post you talk about <<So which ever parent is not traveling should sign the form for the other parent to travel with the children >>

That's not the case here for the OP. It's not a parent needing to get permission from another parent.

IMO and with all due respect, it's taking away from the issue at hand that has been pretty well discussed and covered.