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Is this the correct translation?

San Francisco...
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Is this the correct translation?

I am allergic to peanuts and plan to bring a card written in French to explain my allergy to restaurant servers. One of my biggest concerns is food that might be cooked in peanut oil, especially french fries. I have reviewed various posts about this, but none seems clear to me. I also used various translation services but want to make sure my translation is accurate. I am a bit confused about whether the word for peanuts is cacahuetes or arachides. When I was in Mexico recently, I made a card using Google translate, but when I talked to friends who lived there they chuckled at my card and made a few corrections. Can you please tell me if this is correct:

Je suis allergique aux cacahuetes, arachides, l'huile d'arachide, et une sauce aux cacahuètes. Je vais devenir très malade si je mange des arachides. Aucun arachides, cacahuetes, ou huile d'arachide s'il vous plaît.

Vancouver, Canada
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1. Re: Is this the correct translation?

Arachide sound pleasant, a bit refined...

Cacahouette makes young kids, at the age when they are fascinated by their body fluids, giggle like mad. "caca" is a childish word for one of their bodily excretions

Val-de-Marne, France
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2. Re: Is this the correct translation?

It is perfectly intelligible but I would keep it at that:

" Je suis gravement allergique aux cacahuètes et à l'huile d'arachide".

Peanuts are not found in French cooking, it would only be in exotic foreign dishes. Never seen peanut sauce in France even at Asian restaurants. Not saying it doesn't exist, just that it's uncommon. Peanut oil used to be common in the 70's and 80's but has been replaced by other vegetable oils in restaurants to prevent allergies. So all in all, it will be very easy to avoid.

Val-de-Marne, France
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3. Re: Is this the correct translation?

And definitely use the word "cacahuète" when talking about the nut itself. Some people may not know what an "arachide" is (even though it's a synonym, it is not used in Paris) so you don't want to take the risk.

The word "arachide" is used for the oil though, never "cacahuète".

San Diego...
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4. Re: Is this the correct translation?

Here's a very recent thread on this subject. Definitely read through it:

tripadvisor.com/…58557129

San Francisco...
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5. Re: Is this the correct translation?

Thanks, elizzie4000m; I appreciate you sharing the recent thread about similar allergies. I read that post, but the poster was allergic to both peanuts and tree nuts, and I'm just allergic to peanuts. I know someone on that thread recommended to use an official site that charges money to provide translated cards for travelers with allergies, but it doesn't seem like it's rocket science to figure out how to tell someone that I'm allergic to peanuts, so I was hoping someone who is fluent in the language could help.

Val-de-Marne, France
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6. Re: Is this the correct translation?

Yes, while other types of nuts are very common in French cuisine, peanuts aren't at all, so it will be much easier for you to avoid. And the consumption of peanut oil is close to nil nowadays in France.

It dropped from 32% of the vegetable oil consumption in 1973 to 1% in 2008 and is probably even lower now.

cetiom.fr/debouches-chiffres/…

Just to be on the safe side, you could add the following sentence to your card:

" Je ne dois consommer aucun aliment frit à l'huile d'arachide" (I mustn't eat anything fried in peanut oil).

Paris, France
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7. Re: Is this the correct translation?

I would follow Mrs F_M's advice, and keep things as short and simple as possible for the waiter.

Use large print, double-spaced, underline key words - "allergique", "cacahuete", "huile d'arachide".

Remember, when the waiter approaches your table, he wants to take your order as quickly as possible, because he has to cover a lot more tables than waiters in the US do. He won't have the time for lengthy explanations, lists or a discussion - it's not that he's being rude or uncaring about a serious health problem, he's just pressed for time.

8. Re: Is this the correct translation?

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Removed on: 01 March 2015, 07:35
Paris, France
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9. Re: Is this the correct translation?

bvw1234 - you misread my post. I said to emphasize certain key words, but to use MrsF_M's excellent translation.

Many of the allergy translations on websites go into long detail - most waiters won't take the time to plow through it.

10. Re: Is this the correct translation?

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This post has been removed at the author's request. The author may post again if desired.

Posts on the TripAdvisor forums may be edited for a short period of time. Once the edit period has expired, authors may update their posts by removing and reposting them.

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Removed on: 01 March 2015, 07:35