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cost of eating out

leyland, lancashire
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cost of eating out

Hi. can anyone give me an idea of how much it costs to eat out in the evening? Not thinking of Michelin stars, just everyday type of places. Eg pasta/pizza, chicken dish etc. How much can we expect to pay for a glass of wine in a bar or a restaurant? Staying inland from Nice so I guess would be cheaper in the towns as apposed to Nice itself like any city? thanks

Antibes, France
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11. Re: cost of eating out

Unfortunately yes - in many restaurants wine subsidises the food and a quite average bottle of house wine may cost 25 euro - which is probably dearer than London's Soho. Mark ups are extremely high compared to the cost of wine a supermarket. However you are likely to pay around 3 euro a small glass in an ordinary street café. The cheapest restaurant option, mentioned by Anna-Roz above, is a pichet ( jug) - usually rose is drunk in summer- of local wine - Vin du Pays du Var.

Ed

Edited: 03 August 2013, 09:16
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12. Re: cost of eating out

alicia40

I would agree with around 65 to 80 euros for an evening meal for 2 including wine.

A pizza costs around 10 - 12 euros, an a la carte main course will be 17 or 18 euros upwards in the evening.

Set meals (menus) are better value - starting around 22 to 25 euros for 3 courses in the evening

Set lunch deals are better value ( starting around 12 to 15 euros )

<<Can't believe could be double what we would pay in England when we import most of our wine!!>>

It depends where you drink your wine.- I would say 4 to 5 GBP is pretty normal for a glass of wine in a London pub or bar .

On the Riviera, a glass of house wine is around 2 to 3 euros upwards depending on the establishment.

A bottle of wine starts at around 2 to 2.5 euros euros in supermarkets -considerably cheaper than the UK

angus
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13. Re: cost of eating out

Try "flunch" beside main train station, its a self service resturant, which sells decent french meals, everything from mussles to salads ,wine, etc, for e20' you can eat superbly,also just opposite on right hand side of john medicine ave, there is a vietnamese resturant,the food is in big chiller displays, and they place in micro, weve used it loads and its really good, meal n wine sub e20 again,my wife and i are heading back to nice in sept, our 3rd visit, and mix these 2 places with a few more expensive meals during the week,malcolm and susan

leyland, lancashire
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14. Re: cost of eating out

thanks all. Round here it is about £3.50 a glass in a pub and perhaps £5 in an restaurant. Will probably stock up it the supermarkets and just have a glass or pichet when eating out.

Nice, France
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for Buenos Aires, Nice
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15. Re: cost of eating out

Examining a few menus in the 2-3 blocks around wherever we happen to be is one way in which my husband and I stay within our modest ‘dining out’ budget. Rarely do we have to walk farther.

The cheaper prices that posters above cite are exactly what we’ve been paying unless we're splashing out on some celebration or truffled mashed potatoes, a new obsession of mine that’s all the fault of the chefs at the brasserie, “Georges".

Without a doubt, the biggest saving comes from having your main meal at lunch time (after which there's still time to walk it off) and then opting at night for either good tapas with sangria, a falafel sandwich, a shared Lebanese taster plate or for local snacks such as cod or courgette flower fritters, pissaladiere or socca. We rarely bother with dessert especially not when ordering a la carte. (Dishes served in France –at least in Nice - are so much larger now than they were 15 years ago!) Tap water ("un carafe de l'eau, s'il vous plait") is fine. Only one place in 11 months hasn’t let us have that. We've not yet been served anywhere a glass or half-litre of the cheapest wine on offer that hasn’t been delicious. (In Canada, we often sent back undrinkable wine.)

“Happy Hour” between 6-8pm can be a big money-saver in places that also serve dinner later and aren’t just bars. Some offer as tapas tiny servings of the main dishes they cook – even potato gnocchi, seafood or grilled vegetables. These cost a pittance, are a great way to sample local cooking and depending on whether we order 1 or 4 to share, this can unexpectedly save us from needing to cook that night.

I like hunting for who has the more interesting combined salads. The nicois eat a lot of large salads priced between 12 and 14 euros. With bread, one is a lunch for one or if put with a pasta or cheese plate, that’s plenty for two people especially in this hot weather.

I think that the longer one’s holiday, the less likely a person is to want 2 complete meals day after day. Everywhere I’ve travelled, 3 days has been the limit of my ability to keep up that pace.

I’ve had limited experience eating outside Nice about 10 times but haven't found restaurant food of comparable type and quality to be priced lower inland by more than a couple of euros.

Maine
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16. Re: cost of eating out

What works for us is to plan it out by reading in TA what restaurants we can afford and are good and bring the list along. We usually choose restaurants in the old Nice area, because of the ambiance. It is not fine dining, but in Vieux Nice, Lou Pilha Leva sets up picnic tables in a tiny square. We always go there once when we are in Nice. You buy from a window which has many selections and bring it to a table. It is always packed because It is very good food and not pricey. Many people meet, order socca and a pichet of wine. I always order salad nicoise and share the house wine. Other places in the area have very good menus are reasonably priced, offer tables inside or outdoors. The Cours Saleya, area where the daily market is transforms into a huge square of restaurants at night by increasing the numbers of tables, extending out into the middle of the square, each showing their specials and the price. It is beautiful. We always ask if they have house wine. Buying a pichet of wine is a lot less expensive and it is delicious.

Los Angeles...
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for Venice, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur
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17. Re: cost of eating out

Alicia, we traveled to the UK last Fall and encountered nothing which was less expensive then in France: not food, not wine, not hotel rates, nothing but perhaps National museums which are free :)

What we encountered was that one could order a small or a large glass of wine, which was essentially the same glass just filled differently. Again, no receipts saved, but I think it would be something like 4-5 GBP for a small glass and 7-9 GBP for a large glass (was just a normal glass of wine). We did not really eat in restaurants except for in Wales, so these prices are for gastropubs. We also found meals to be more expensive then in France, more so for us with our $$ continuously in the toilet.

The issue, at least in my mind, is not that France or Europe in general is more expensive but that it very quickly adds up for a traveler in need to seek restaurant food once or even twice a day. Here in Cali, we dine out once a week, sometimes once in a fortnight. So, even if we go out for a great meal (multi-course in a good restaurant, with a great bottle of Cali wine) and expect to push $200, more in popular Downtown restaurants, that is only occasionally. Cannot do that on a three week European holiday.

Just some meusings on the subject..

And I wanted to make a point about table vs. bottled water. We do not drink tap water at home. Do not know if we can or should, since reports are so conflicting, so we buy bottled water for the house. So why in the World would I drink tap water in France? How do I know that the water is safe to drink? So it adds another few Euro to my bill but husband loves his fizzy Bedoit and if he is happy, all is good on a holiday. :)

Edited: 03 August 2013, 17:00
leyland, lancashire
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18. Re: cost of eating out

wow thanks again everyone! We only eat out in the evening as a rule, making our own breakfast and snacks. I know usually the lunch time offers are better but can never eat a large meal when it is so warm in the middle of the day unfortunately.

Guildford, United...
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19. Re: cost of eating out

I have been drinking tap water almost every day for the last 69 years and 11 months and I am still in excellent health. On hot days in Villefranche I sometimes drink more than a gallon with no ill effects. I had an academic colleague, whose expertise was in water quality, who told me that the principal difference between bottled and tap water, in the UK at any rate, lay in the pollutants that bottled water absorbs from its plastic container. I doubt if that is any different in France. The point I was making earlier is that some restaurants in Nice will foist a five euro bottle of water on you without asking and that anyone content with tap water needs to reject it.

Los Angeles...
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20. Re: cost of eating out

Well, Happy-almost-real-big-Birthday, LondonBob! :)