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Trams in Berlin ?

Victoria
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Trams in Berlin ?

Are Trams used very often by 'tourists' in Berlin. I wonder if say on a wet day taking a trip to 'the end of the line' and back would be an interesting way to keep dry, and which route would be the most interesting architecturally?. Where can I find online a tram route map, please?. Do they go between the usual sites, the way the U-bahn seems to ?. Thanks ( Planing for 1st trip to Berlin in August. Other's questions and answers on this Forum very helpful)

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1. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

download the map here

www.bvg.de/index.php/en/17106/name/Tram.html

London, United...
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2. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

The trams are all in east Berlin, and serve the eastern, southeastern and northeastern suburbs. Alexanderplatz is a hub for many of them. They are a quick way of getting around, and a good way of exploring unfamiliar areas of the city that aren't as well served by the U-bahn and S-bahn. You won't find that they "go between the usual sites" - but they are the most direct way of getting to some of the significant destinations in East Berlin - e.g. the Stasi prison at Hohenschoenhausen and the Weissensee Jewish cemetery.

Many of the areas served by the trams are the poorer parts of the city, with housing architecture that hasn't changed much since the DDR days. I'm generalising, but although I enjoy the trams I imagine that riding past miles of dreary housing blocks might be a little grim on a wet day. I think I'd rather duck into a museum.

Here is a link to an interesting fairly recent thread: scroll down, and in Bill2P's post 21 you'll find a link to a map.

tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowTopic-g187323-i135-k48…

Edited: 12 April 2012, 08:06
Manchester, United...
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3. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

We used the tram twice during our recent visit to Berlin and saw a mix of locals and tourists on board the ones we used so YES they are used by tourists. If you have one of the travel pass options (we had the 7 day ticket) it's worth noting that you get unlimited travel on the trams as well as the buses and U+S Bahn too so it's worth giving them a go. Although we had picked up a copy of the tram map when we bought our travel passes at the airport (thanks for the tip Alabastron) we hadn't planned on using the tram during any of our day trips as we weren't spending much time in the eastern part of the city. It was a spontaneous jump onto a passing tram at Alexanderplatz that initially broke the mould for us and then we consulted the map to include a second tram journey later in that day!

The trams we saw were all modern and not period/vintage or particularly 'romantic' like in some cities and the DDR housing project architecture does get depressing en masse so personally my rainy day option would also be a lesser-visited museum or, better still, a lingering coffee/cake and postcard writing session at a period cafe like the gorgeous Cafe Einstein on Kurfürstenstraße or the enormous food hall in the KaDeWe department store :-)

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4. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

Hi Ragoora

Nice to see you back. I hope you are going to do a trip report! I got quite involved in your planning and would love to know how it all went.

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5. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

Your help was invaluable Alabastron from the tranquility of the Bode Museum cafe to the aforementioned tram map and your advice was often in our heads. I'm not really one to do trip reports, especially as this trip was focussed on quite 'under the radar' stuff and would not appeal to most TA readers, but I do like to chip in with snippets to assist others whilst the old memory is still fresh ;-)

Some personal highlights were our neighbourhood walk around Schöneberg, Cafe Einstein on Kurfürstenstraße, the recently refurbished Stasi HQ, the Amarna rooms at the Neues Museum, stumbling across a Canova at the Bode Museum, the transport system in general, an hour spent walking around the Dorotheenstädtischer Friedhof, the exterior of the Philharmonie building in glorious sunshine and all four evening concerts/plays that we attended! We never got to find the memorial plaque to Magnus Hirschfield and his ground-breaking Institute but we were glad to see that it was a major reference point in the Topography of Terror installation. It's often glossed over but 9/10 of the books burnt in Bebelplatz on 10th May 1933 were from the Institute and a wooden effigy of Hirschfield was also burnt at the same time - Christopher Isherwood writes a chilling first hand account of it in his autobiography 'Christopher and his Kind'

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6. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

Thank you Ragoora - I'm glad you had a successful trip. The "under the radar" stuff is always interesting! I'm going to send you a PM so as not to get too off-topic on the tram thread.

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7. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

I think it’s fair to say that most tourists who intend to travel round Berlin will have some kind of day or week travelcard and so trams are like the U-Bahn and S-Bahn in as much you keep your (validated) ticket in your pocket and jump on and off the trams as you please, and like the U-Bahn and S-Bahn each stop is announced and displayed as you go along.

Last week I had a tram day out and travelled from Prenzlauer Berg to Köpenick (South East Berlin) by tram. The way I went took something like five different trams to get there (I was wandering around a bit), however looking at the tram map now you can get there using two trams – (any one of M8, M6, M5, M4, M12 and then change to the M27). I got off at Rathaus Köpenick and it really nice round there in the old part of town down by the river. While I was there I made use of my Museum Pass and went into the Kunstgewerbemuseum on the Schlossinsel which was worth a look.

Heading back, I know this is a ‘what to do on a bad weather day’ thread, so I’d say get the tram back two stops to Köpenick S-Bahn and catch the S3 back into town. However if the weather is not too bad, depending on times, you could catch a river cruise boat back to Treptower Park.

...final thing … someone on here previously mentioned that the M68 tram which you can catch from Rathaus Köpenick was included as one of National Geographic’s world wide top ten tram rides

…nationalgeographic.com/travel/…

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8. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

Wibble, your post comes in good time again. My plan for my next visit is to take the Stern und Kreis Muggelsee tour to Kopenick, explore Kopenick (Kunstgewerbe Museum included) and take the S-bahn back. But now that I know about the M27, that's what I'll do. Where is its stop?

I already owe you grateful thanks (offered a couple of weeks ago, but you may not have seen them) for your tip about taking the Ring to Jungfernheide and wandering through the Schlossgarten. Thanks to you I had a wonderful day, What a lovely place and what a good way to get there: I'm not surprised you do it every week or so.

And thanks too for the NG article and the M67 information.

Edited: 12 April 2012, 13:52
Berlin, Germany
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9. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

The old part of Köpenick is not very big, the museum is less than a five minute walk from where the boats land and the tram stop is even close. The trams in the old town run one way round a triangle of streets (it would take less than a minute to do a lap non-stop) . When you get off the boat you may see trams running left to right in front of the town hall... the stop you want is where they run right to left behind the church on Kirschstraße

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10. Re: Trams in Berlin ?

The old town of Köpenick has an island like location.

berlin-tourismus-online.de/berlins-largest-e…

sights in the district Treptow-Köpenick

berlin-tourismus-online.de/gettoknowthedistr…

Landmarks are Köpenick Palace (#25) and the town hall (#23) which is one of the best known town halls in Germany due the story of the "captain of Köpenick".

Tram 68 continues along the Langer See (long lake) with the regatta-distance (#47) to Alt-Schmöckwitz. Which is on an island formed by a few lakes of the Dahme-Spree river system.

…wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Luftbi…