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Street Food Culture

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Manchester, United...
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Street Food Culture

I was wondering if there's any type of street food in Malaga or the Costa Del Sol in general.

On my travels to SE Asia, Turkey etc, there were lots of opportunities to grab some quick food on the street, from vendors that have been there for many many years. I wonder if there's anything similar in S.Spain.

I'm not expecting the same as in Asia, but prehaps some food markets? Food court type of thing?

Cheers

Malaga, Spain
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1. Re: Street Food Culture

We don't have a street food culture here like Asia has.

Food carts here mainly consist on fast food items. However, there is an exception: baked potatoes. These are cooked in portable ovens and filled with all kinds of stuff: tuna, corn, mayonnaise. I have had them since my early years. There is a place that sells these potatoes in Calle Granada in the city centre.

However, I'd encourage you to visit the Atarazanas Market also in the centre of Málaga. You'll see all fresh products that Málaga province can offer, and if you go early (early in Spanish terms, 13.30) I'd recommend you to go to the bar located on the southwest corner of the market to have some wine and a tapa of fried fish.

Edited: 03 April 2013, 14:32
Malaga, Spain
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2. Re: Street Food Culture

Samuel:

There are several street vendors who sell almonds on the street. There is one who does this beside the Cathedral. During Holy Week and the Malaga Fair, there are others who sell the baked potatoes and other things.

Manchester, United...
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3. Re: Street Food Culture

Thanks. Doesn't exactly fill me with excitment to be honest lol.

I really hope the weather is sunbathable at the end of this month :D

Olvera, Spain
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4. Re: Street Food Culture

Although I am not a visitor to the Costa del Sol, I head for the hills so to speak I would like to point out that Spain has a café culture where people stop for coffee, coffee and tapas, another drink and tapas and/or meals. The traditional café/bar is something to be enjoyed.

Saludos. Lindsay

Malaga, Spain
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5. Re: Street Food Culture

Well Spain has one of the best gastronomies in the world, and as said above the food culture in Spain is very unique.

Bar hopping having some tapas in each (small portions of freshly cooked food) is the way to go, and not very different from the food carts I have found in my many trips to Asian countries such as Thailand.

Torremolinos, Spain
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6. Re: Street Food Culture

Lots of excitement to be had foodwise in Málaga, Samuel. As MACPollo says, grazing whilst bar-hopping is the way to go - you'll find plenty of places offering excellent freshly-prepared tapas. A true tapa is really a small nibble but you don't have to stop at one.

Eating whilst wandering around isn't really an Andalucían thing, food (from a small tapa up to to full-on dinner) is seen as a social thing to be enjoyed with friends rather than fuel to be consumed on the street.

Manchester, United...
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7. Re: Street Food Culture

Ok what's the deal with Tapas then?

Is there a menu?

Do i just walk into a bar and ask for Tapas?

Does every bar have their own specific kind?

Olvera, Spain
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8. Re: Street Food Culture

Tapas is small plates of food which may be served hot, warm or cold. The verb "tapar" to cover is the origin of the name as food would have been served on small pieces of bread which the diners would have used to cover their sherry glasses. They can be hot, cold or warm. Bars and cafés all have their own specialities although many will have similar selections. In some bars, particularly in rural areas, a tapa will be offered with a drink (free) often olives, cheese, nut mixes, etc but not so much so in built up touristy places. The majority of bars will have a menu to choose from.

One of the bars where we eat in Olvera (two hours drive inland from Málaga), I would buy three tapas per person and this makes a substantial meal. They often have a selection of fish dishes in particular calamaris, pork stew, Andalucían black pudding, quails eggs, olive mixes, cheeses, miniature skewers of chicken or pork and so on. It is a very nice way to try things you might otherwise shy away from if served as a full dinner serving.

Saludos. Lindsay

scotland
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9. Re: Street Food Culture

Samuel , this may help you a little tripadvisor.co.uk/Travel-g187438-c102365/Mal…

10. Re: Street Food Culture

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