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Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

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Connecticut
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161 posts
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Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

1) Is the tap water potable in the Campania area?

2) In my hotel room, can I use the water from the tap to take prescription meds, or to just drink?

3) Is it advisable to buy bottled water at a restaurant, in these areas, or is it ok to ask for the tap water?

Thank you again for all your advice.

UK
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4,630 posts
6 reviews
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1. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Drinking water has always been safe in homes in these places (at least since the 1950s !). I think it is fairly safe to say that most Italian people drink bottled water even in Northern Italy (which Americans consider to be 'civilised'), because they prefer it, or because it's considered 'chic'. Same goes for the South. Some areas of Naples receive beautiful Spring water from the Serino spring - in the mountains, but other areas do not. Generally speaking, tap water from all these places in Italy is safe. You would only need to worry if you don't know where the water has come from. Sometimes the water shortage in summer means that other 'reservoir' water (either from a tank in the roof, or from a public reservoir) needs to be supplied to the public/private water system. It's fine for brushing your teeth or washing. You won't know how 'clean' or 'stale' this water is. I suggest you drink bottled water (it's very cheap bought from local supermarkets) all the time, simply because it's no fun getting a 'funny tummy' on holiday. Hotel room tap water - needs to be checked with the management - you never know if they use water from their tanks or fresh from the mains. Why make such a big thing of it ? Wash in the hotel water, and buy drinking water with your meal, or wine if you can take it - at a restaurant, the wine may even be cheaper than the water, but only water will quench your thirst. Nip into the local supermarket to buy a couple of litres to keep in your hotel room. You can also buy it from a 'salumeria'. If you buy the little bottles you can even put it in the minibar fridge and have it nice and cold. Apart from that, Italy is a civilised, modern country and its drinking water is considered safe for residents to drink.

Norwich, United...
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17,792 posts
2 reviews
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2. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

>>Sometimes the water shortage in summer means that other 'reservoir' water (either from a tank in the roof, or from a public reservoir) needs to be supplied to the public/private water system.

and

>>You won't know how 'clean' or 'stale' this water is. I suggest you drink bottled water (it's very cheap bought from local supermarkets) all the time, simply because it's no fun getting a 'funny tummy' on holiday.

Anyone who's been following the discussion of 'comfort stations' in another long thread here will have particular reason to keep this wise advice in mind!

Peter

UK
Level Contributor
4,630 posts
6 reviews
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3. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Drinking water has always been safe in homes in these places (at least since the 1950s !). I think it is fairly safe to say that most Italian people drink bottled water even in Northern Italy (which Americans consider to be 'civilised'), because they prefer it, or because it's considered 'chic'. Same goes for the South. Some areas of Naples receive beautiful Spring water from the Serino spring - in the mountains, but other areas do not. Generally speaking, tap water from all these places in Italy is safe. You would only need to worry if you don't know where the water has come from. Sometimes the water shortage in summer means that other 'reservoir' water (either from a tank in the roof, or from a public reservoir) needs to be supplied to the public/private water system. It's fine for brushing your teeth or washing. You won't know how 'clean' or 'stale' this water is. I suggest you drink bottled water (it's very cheap bought from local supermarkets) all the time, simply because it's no fun getting a 'funny tummy' on holiday. Hotel room tap water - needs to be checked with the management - you never know if they use water from their tanks or fresh from the mains. Why make such a big thing of it ? Wash in the hotel water, and buy drinking water with your meal, or wine if you can take it - at a restaurant, the wine may even be cheaper than the water, but only water will quench your thirst. Nip into the local supermarket to buy a couple of litres to keep in your hotel room. You can also buy it from a 'salumeria'. If you buy the little bottles you can even put it in the minibar fridge and have it nice and cold. Apart from that, Italy is a civilised, modern country and its drinking water is considered safe for residents to drink.

UK
Level Contributor
4,630 posts
6 reviews
Save Reply
4. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Drinking water has always been safe in homes in these places (at least since the 1950s !). I think it is fairly safe to say that most Italian people drink bottled water even in Northern Italy (which Americans consider to be 'civilised'), because they prefer it, or because it's considered 'chic'. Same goes for the South. Some areas of Naples receive beautiful Spring water from the Serino spring - in the mountains, but other areas do not. Generally speaking, tap water from all these places in Italy is safe. You would only need to worry if you don't know where the water has come from. Sometimes the water shortage in summer means that other 'reservoir' water (either from a tank in the roof, or from a public reservoir) needs to be supplied to the public/private water system. It's fine for brushing your teeth or washing. You won't know how 'clean' or 'stale' this water is. I suggest you drink bottled water (it's very cheap bought from local supermarkets) all the time, simply because it's no fun getting a 'funny tummy' on holiday. Hotel room tap water - needs to be checked with the management - you never know if they use water from their tanks or fresh from the mains. Why make such a big thing of it ? Wash in the hotel water, and buy drinking water with your meal, or wine if you can take it - at a restaurant, the wine may even be cheaper than the water, but only water will quench your thirst. Nip into the local supermarket to buy a couple of litres to keep in your hotel room. You can also buy it from a 'salumeria'. If you buy the little bottles you can even put it in the minibar fridge and have it nice and cold. Apart from that, Italy is a civilised, modern country and its drinking water is considered safe for residents to drink.

Norwich, United...
Level Contributor
17,792 posts
2 reviews
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5. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Well, I've slept on it - and still don't understand the point of posting that three times?

Peter

Le Marche, Italy
Destination Expert
for Rome, Marche
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37,667 posts
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6. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Probably TA said it hadn't gone through, which they've sometimes indicated to me, causing me to make duplicate posts. I don't believe them any more.

UK
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4,630 posts
6 reviews
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7. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Hi everyone ! Yes.... I can't see the point either - and I did only post it once !!!!!!! O.k. now let's see if they take the extra ones off for us - so I don't look an absolute twit !

Norwich, United...
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17,792 posts
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8. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Like a radar beam unexpectedly bouncing back and forth from the underside of those clouds of volcanic ash!

Peter

Connecticut
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161 posts
1 review
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9. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Thank you for your input. All that being said, what is the cost of an 8 ounce (.24 liters?)bottle of drinking water (the size you can carry around). It appears that water will turn into somewhat of an expense.

Montreal
Level Contributor
17,790 posts
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10. Re: Drinking water in Rome, Naples, Salerno, etc.

Small bottles of water are generally 300 ml or 500 ml. If you buy it from a stand next to a famous monument, it will be an expense. If you buy it at a grocery store or supermarket, it will cost pennies. I've bought 1.5-liter bottles of water in the historical center of Rome for 0.55 Euro.