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Rome's Ancient Walls

Virginia
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Rome's Ancient Walls

I was watching this neat special on National Geographic about Rome and it's history and they showed parts of it today in modern times.

They were talking about the 11 mile wall that surrounds parts of the city. Showed some big roads and pedestrian walkways that go through it. Looked neat.

Any idea where you could get some of the best views of the wall or if it's near some of the big sites in the city?

Hagerstown, Maryland
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1. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

You can easily find parts of it just a few blocks from the Termini train station. Near the Spanish Steps as well.

I've never visited it, but there is a Museum devoted to it. I think it's near the gate in the wall near the Baths of Caracalla. Not sure though.

Edited: 29 June 2010, 21:12
Southend-on-Sea...
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2. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

You are right, jjkdc. There is a museum in the Porta San Sebastiano; here's a link

…museodellemuraroma.it/informazioni_pratiche…

St Paul, MN
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3. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

I've been to the Museum of the wall. somewhat interesting. The day we were there on a sunday, they would not allow us out onlot the wall itself.

St Paul, MN
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4. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

Porta San Sebastiano. Saint Sebastian Gate in the Aurelian Wall.

www.slowphotos.com/photo/showphoto.php…

www.slowphotos.com/photo/showphoto.php…

San Giovanni gate

www.slowphotos.com/photo/showphoto.php…

pittsburgh
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5. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

If you walk down the via Veneto to the borghese park you go through the wall. They've made it so the auto traffic can get through also.

Donna

Mykonos, Greece
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6. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

Not sure if it's the same wall, but the little Protestant Cemetery containing the Pyramid of Caius Cestius which is built into the walls I thought was fascinating to see how they embedded the pyramid itself into the wall.

As the previous poster states, as you go up beyond the top of the Spanish Steps, through the Pincio Gardens into the Borghese Gardens, you will pass over a great view of the walls, although somewhat spoiled by the bustling roadway that skirts them.

Denver, Colorado
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7. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

THeere is a piece of the Seveeran wall just outside Teermini. There ais also a piece inside Termini, on the lower level by the McDonald's.

The Muesum of the Walls is by t6he Porta San Sebastiano. Be sure to look at the older gate (Drusus) inside that. There are several other gates you can also see.

St Paul, MN
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8. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

"Not sure if it's the same wall, but the little Protestant Cemetery "

same wall. Aurelaian

St Paul, MN
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9. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

The arch of Drusus

www.slowphotos.com/photo/showphoto.php…

www.slowphotos.com/photo/showphoto.php…

is thought by archeologists to have been and aqueduct support.

Boston...
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10. Re: Rome's Ancient Walls

We did visit the Museo delle Mura di Roma in May and it was a high point. We took a cab there, walked back to the bottom edge of the Colosseum and got a cab. Also neat is that on the other side of the gate is the Via Appia. I think it was 4E each and there were only 2 other people there

Here is the info I gathered about it:

This 3rd-century gate, flanked by walls built to support the aqueduct that daily carried millions of gallons of water to the nearby Baths of Caracalla, now hosts a fascinating museum, and it is the starting point of a half-mile stroll along one of the most beautiful stretches of Rome's ancient walls.

This walk is one of the most enchanting experiences you can have in a bustling modern city. From atop the ramparts, all you'll see is a broad expanse of timeless Roman countryside. Wild grasses lap the inner wall. If you go in late summer, blackberry bushes spread their luscious fruit on the parapet. The sweet powdery smell of figs fills the air. Crickets fiddle in the olive trees. Three hundred yards away you'll see the fuzzy remains of Caracalla, and far off in the distance, gleaming white amidst two black green clusters of umbrella pines, you'll spot il cupolone: the dome of St. Peter's Cathedral.

The museum to which it refers is here http://en.museodellemuraroma.it Opening hours Tuesday-Sunday 9.00am-2.00pm (the ticket office closes half an hour in advance).

Via di Porta San Sebastiano, 18, 00179 Roma, Italy

Included in the Museum visit:

1 – the terrace above the central body of the gate, between the two towers, which offers a central view along the route of the Via Appia Antica, overlooked by its numerous blackbirds;

2 – the terrace at the top of the west tower, rendered secure and accessible to the public with the restoration work for the 2000 Jubilee. From here the visitors can feast their eyes on a 360 degree view: the outline of the Castelli Romani hills is recognisable in the background, and closer the path of the walkway connected to the museum can be seen, winding its way through the verdant countryside.

The Walkway

From the museum it is possible to access a long section, about 350 metres, of the wall’s parapet walk, an integral part of the museum’s educational itinerary. The walk consists of a covered gallery, punctuated by ten towers, which ends with a high open walkway, which offers shelter to the blackbirds. Masonry from the age of Honorius (early fifth century AD) is conserved along the walk, with arrow-slits for the archers within the niches, and huge open arcades opening out onto the city side of the wall, as well as staircases inside several of the towers which used to lead to the command rooms above, no longer in existence. Restoration work from several of the subsequent eras, from Medieval times to the XIX century, is visible, and can be distinguished by the various types of construction technique, or by the transformation of some of the wall structure, after parts of the wall collapsed in the course of the centuries. The squared arrow-slits dating to 1848 can also be seen, the result of transformations to adapt them for artillery during the gun battles of the Roman Republic.

Leaving the third tower on the walkway the remains of the original floor should be particularly noted: a central crevice marks the line where the Aurelian structure and the enlargements made by Honorius meet; above in the lunette of the tower’s exit bay is a picture of the Madonna and Child, a reminder of the tower’s use as a hermit’s retreat, perhaps in the Medieval period.