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trastevere

gibraltar
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trastevere

I am visiting trastevere in november and have been watching videos and photos on tripadvisor. My question is why is there so much grafitti on walls and doors, is this a rough area of rome?

Sydney, Australia
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for Train Travel
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1. Re: trastevere

No rougher than elsewhere, but perhaps not cleaned as often. It is not at all a dangerous area.

St Paul, MN
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2. Re: trastevere

There is grafffiti on the walls all over Rome and in italy in general.

New York City, New...
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3. Re: trastevere

There is graffiti everywhere in Rome, the practice actually dates back to ancient Roman times. It's a more accepted part of the urban landscape than say here in the States.

Seattle, Washington
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4. Re: trastevere

You can't get much more Italian than graffiti. It's an Italian word after all. Go to the ruins at Pompeii and you can see 2000 year old graffiti. There is graffiti all over the place in Italy, not just Rome. Part of the problem is the high level of unemployment for young men and the lack of sufficient funds to clean it up. (You've probably read about the economic problems there.) The Italians have huge bills just trying to maintain all their existing heritage.

If you choose to see the graffiti as a natural part of the landscape, it won't bother you as much. But I agree it can be quite a shock for those who haven't read about it or seen pictures before they arrive on their first trip to Italy,

Passo Corese, Italy
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5. Re: trastevere

Well, in Italy - contrary to the U.S. - graffiti aren't associated with gang violence. Most of them are "just" petty acts of vandalism or political slogans, nothing else. And recently much of said graffiti has been cleaned up so in central areas like Trastevere they aren't much of a problem.

Edited: 11 September 2012, 10:27
Norwich, United...
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6. Re: trastevere

From a trawl through many years of photos....

http://www.pbase.com/isolaverde/graff_rom

Peter

Le Marche, Italy
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for Rome, Marche
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7. Re: trastevere

The type of spray-paint graffiti seen in Italy (and nearly all over the world) has nothing to do with the ancient Italian tradition of graffiti. The modern spray-paint graffiti has primary intention of marking territory, sort of the human equivalent of a dog's marking every fire hydrant he passes. It originated in the US, probably in Philadelphia, in the late 1960s and has spread like an oil scum from there.

The graffiti tradition in Italy was based on political comment, social commentary, or even conveying information, a sort of advertisement for goods or services. It was nowhere near as obtrusive, being mostly scratched with a nail on stone or brick walls. The word "graffiti" means "little scratchings".

As proof of this, the Italian term for modern spray paint graffiti is "writing", not graffiti. They use an English term because they see it as a foreign import.

1060 W Addison...
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8. Re: trastevere

>> You can't get much more Italian than graffiti. It's an Italian word after all

Hmm, does that mean there is such a thing as "un graffito"

Norwich, United...
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9. Re: trastevere

Of course there is....doesn't Google work in Chicago?

Peter

New York City, New...
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10. Re: trastevere

Isn't all art, graffiti or advertising a means of conveying information?

Whether it is spray painted or scratched, whether the message is political or a lover's declaration (very common in Rome), or a gang marking territory.

I am sure if the ancient Romans had spray paint they would have used it!!!

Some even call modern graffiti "street art" -- does it have any less merit than a Michelangelo, Pollock or Picasso painting? Art and beauty are subjective.

IMO it just adds to the charm, I love seeing the metros all covered in "graffiti" in Rome, it reminds of New York in the 80s :-)