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Accommodation close or outside?

Yeppoon, Australia
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Accommodation close or outside?

Hello-

My husband, 20month son and myself are travelling to rome late jan 14-

This in one place we are looking at staying....

Relais 6

Via Tolmino 6, 00198 Rome, Italy

We will save some money- my question is, is it worth it? Can we walk to places from here? Or Is this easy to use public transport from? Or is it just too far?

We want to see the main tourist attractions, but also would love to just get lost wandering and exploring the city- not just the tourist parts.

So I'm after really suggestions of the best place/area to stay- it is so overwhelming! (Keeping in mind we love to walk :) )

Also some non-tourist places that we should visit.

Thanks

pittsburgh
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1. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

It's not close to anything. You'll need to find public transport or use taxis to get to the city center. I would contact the hotel to see if they can offer advice on buses that can take you into the city.

donna

Sydney, Australia
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2. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

There would be buses along Via Nomentana that would take you into central Rome, but the address is some 3 km from central Rome and there is nothing nearby in terms of restaurants and cafes.

One of the joys of staying in Rome is wandering around the pedestrian areas of the city centre in the evenings, taking in all the restaurants and street life. It is more difficult to do this if you are not staying in the centre.

If you can say how much you are intending to spend on accommodation per night, in euros, someone may be able to suggest somewhere more central.

Alas, you will not find anywhere in central Rome that is free of tourists.

Yeppoon, Australia
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3. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

thank you both of you- that is what i was looking for!

under 100 euro per night.

what about these two places:

Hotel Santa Maria

Vicolo del Piede 2, 00153 Rome, Ita

or

Hotel Golden

Via Marche 84, 00187 Rome, Italy

i've read the reviews on here and other sites… we just want to be able to walk to see most places. can either of you help please with other non-tourist must see in Rome?

I've travelled before, but find Rome overwhelming- i think because i don't speak Italian.

Edited: 24 November 2013, 02:09
Sydney, Australia
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4. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

The Santa Maria is not badly placed just south of the river. Hotel Golden is right at the northern edge of central Rome.

It is some 4 km from the Vatican Museums to the Colosseum, so you will not find anywhere that is convenient walking distance from all the sights.

Like most major cities, Rome does not have any "must see" places that have not been discovered by tourists.

Salt Lake City, Utah
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5. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

We just got home last week from a week long vacation and we stayed at Hotel Golden. We loved everything about it and we walked everywhere! It's one block over from Via Veneto and maybe 15 minutes from Trevi Fountain. Giuseppe or Marco will give you a wonderful map and show you how to get everywhere you want to go. You can't go wrong staying at Hotel Golden :)

Le Marche, Italy
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6. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

The Via Tolmino is not in an inconvenient location, although it's not walking distance from very much. On Via Nomentana, you can get a number 90 express bus, which will get you very quickly to Termini station, and from there you can get the metro or a bus to nearly anywhere. There is a new metro stop near the Via Tolmino, the Sant'Agnese stop of the B1 extension. This line will take you directly to the Colosseum, or you can switch to the line A at Termini station. The number 60 bus also runs along Via Nomentana, and will take you to Piazza Venezia, which is walking distance from lots of places, including Trevi Fountain, the Roman Forum/Palatine Hill/Colosseum, and from the Pantheon. If you walk from the hotel to Viale Regina Margherita, you can get a tram in one direction to the Villa Borghese Park (arriving near the Villa Giulia Museum of Etruscan Civilization, and also the Museum of Modern Art.) In the other direction, another tram will take you (by a rather long route) to the Colosseum.

I've stayed in this area several times, and consider it a good alternative to the more touristy parts of the city. It's a mostly residential area, where many of the larger buildings are the property of various religious organizations, some of which have been turned into nursing homes or private schools. There are also some embassies in the area.

Since you want to see some nontouristy things, I'll mention several things that are an easy walk from Via Tolmino. One is the Catacomb of Saint Agnes, whose complex also includes the beautiful little church of Santa Costanza, one of the few totally intact ancient Roman buildings in the city. Here is my earlier description of this catacomb:

"The Catacomb of Saint Agnes is interesting more for the whole complex in which it's located than for the catacomb itself. I've visited there twice, both times with excellent small group tours offered by the religious order that maintains the site. This catacomb, unlike all the others, grew up around the tomb of a martyr, Saint Agnes. She was murdered in the early 4th century supposedly because she refused to marry the son of a Roman official. Her foster sister, Saint Emerentiana (the daughter of Saint Agnes' nursemaid), was also murdered, because she refused to stop praying at the tomb of Saint Agnes.

"The murder of these two young girls (about 12 years old at the time) shocked Romans, even the non-Christians. Pilgrims came to their tombs, and people wanted to be buried near them. The Emperor Constantine built a basilica at the site in the 4th century and his daughter Costanza built a mausoleum near it so she could be buried there. However she died away from Rome, and was buried where she died; the mausoleum was turned into a church, which is one of the most intact ancient buildings in Rome. You can visit this church, which has beautiful 4th century mosaics on the ceiling of the ambulatory, including one that depicts an ancient Roman grape harvest.

"The catacomb is entered through a door in the nave of the 7th century basilica, partly underground, that replaced the earlier one. The catacomb itself has little of artistic interest, but there is a very nice golden mosaic in the apse of the basilica. The tour ends in the crypt of the Basilica, where the two young martyrs are buried together. Each year on the Feast of Saint Agnes, two lambs are blessed in the Basilica, and taken away to be raised at a monastery. Their wool, spun and woven by hand at a convent, is used to make the pallia for new archbishops."

Also within walking distance is the Villa Torlonia Park, a large and beautiful park with several historic palazzi that can be visited, including the interesting Casina delle Civette. One of the houses was the Roman home of Mussolini, lent to him by Prince Torlonia.

http://en.museivillatorlonia.it/

A little further away, but still an easy walk is the Quartiere Coppedé, where there are lots of ornate palazzi designed in Liberty style at the beginning of the 20th century.

www.atlasobscura.com/places/quartiere-copped

About a mile away, on the Via Salaria, is the Catacomb of Priscilla (not a saint, just a rich Roman woman who sold the rights to build a catacomb), which has perhaps the best early Christian frescoes in the world. There is a very well preserved little 3rd-century chapel decorated with painted Biblical scenes. The earliest known painting of the Virgin and Child (between 200-250 AD) is also found in this catacomb, although it's a little hard to make it out. This catacomb also tends to have very small group tours.

7. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

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8. Re: Accommodation close or outside?

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