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wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

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wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

It has been 15 years since I have been in Rome. I did not wear a money belt at that time but also did not carry much $ around with me.

Having read the voluminous threads about money belts and all the other gadgets, I'm still pretty confused lol

I'm not keen on the money belt solution. In France and the UK, over several trips, I've just worn my wallet in my front pocket and kept my hands near it and been aware of my surroundings.

I would be fine with a pac safe wallet with chain attached but the money belt just seems too inconvenient to carry around especially for small purchases and food and having to find a place to raise my shirt constantly lol

I'm willing to be convinced of course

Thoughts? Criticisms? Other solutions?

Le Marche, Italy
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for Rome, Marche
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21. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

I've had the same wallet for over 20 years, so I don't think I'm prone to losing things. However, I almost lost my wallet last year when taking a train from Bologna. We had a tight connection and hadn't had lunch. The platform was very crowded. I went to a vending machine to buy a couple of sandwiches and water so that we could eat on the train. As I was returning to where my husband was, I heard somebody say, "ma'am, you've dropped something". I almost didn't turn around, because there's a famous scam that starts out like that. However, I did, and saw that my wallet had fallen on the platform. I realized that I had been balancing it in the crook of my arm while putting coins in the machine, and had forgot to put it away before walking back, with my arms full, to where my husband was waiting with our suitcases.

Thinking about it later, I realized that if I had noticed hours later that my wallet was missing, I would have been sure that a pickpocket had got it on that crowded train platform.

Ian
Leeds U.K.
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for Costa del Sol
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22. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

Just reading this thread whilst starting to plan a trip to Rome this autumn.

In europe I just take out a euro card which I download each day with about 100 euros and take 30 euros in cash.

If stolen they still need the pin number, my maximum loss if limited to around 100 euros, far less then my insurance claim level.

Just download more money as needed at no cost. All other cards, passports, docs etc locked in hotel safe, would never stop in a place unless it had a safe.

Meals for two on the costa del sol come out around 50 euros, will my 100 euros card level cover a good lunch and dinner, can reload the card during our siesta, so 200 euros in total for the two meals.

I intend to buy travel passes and as we dont walk very well, will jump on a bus or train just to travel 400 yards. Working on passes for museums etc, so hopefully need money for food and drinks (plenty)

Like to eat meals if possible off the main drags and a more local feel, again will this be likely to be a cash situation, assume ATM's on every street corner.

Oxnard, CA
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23. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

I enjoyed bvlenci 's post. On one of our visits, my wife and I decided to visit the Spanish Steps and have a drink at the Hotel Eden ... expensive but worth the view of the Vatican. I paid with my credit card but rather than putting it back in my wallet, I put it in a pocket with my cash. At any rate, we hailed a taxi at the Spanish Stairs taxi stand to take us back to our hotel. We paid the taxi driver in cash. Went to bed and about 1 am got a call from the front desk. The taxi driver had driven back to the hotel after cleaning his cab and finding my credit card. Oh yes, he got a BIG tip and a heartfelt thank you. The card was never compromised. People are for the most part honest. So don't be paranoid. Stay alert to your surroundings and don't put your credit card with your cash. :-)

Boston...
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24. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

I thought that you were required to carry your passport at all times? We used to make a copy of it and carry that while leaving the real thing in the hotel. But we were told that even that is technically illegal.

Le Marche, Italy
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for Rome, Marche
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25. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

Ian, it's hard for me to figure out what your questions are; a few question marks would have helped.

My husband and I eat for much less than 100 euros a day. We usually have one full meal, sharing at least one course, and one light meal. For a sit-down meal, we rarely spend more than 50 euros for the two of us. For a light meal, pizza for example, we usually spend less than 30 euros. We're not big eaters; we usually order two first course, or one first course and one appetizer. Then we order one second (meat or fish) course and one cortorno (vegetables or salad) and we share these. We usually don't get dessert, but if we do, we get one and share it. We also usually drink nothing but mineral water. I would say that on average we spend 60-70 euros a day for meals.

Le Marche, Italy
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for Rome, Marche
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26. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

Elaine, you're correct. You're required to carry a national identity card, but many tourists don't. In the US, you can get a credit-card sized passport card. While this is not official identification, it probably would satisfy a police officer. The main thing it's missing is the date you entered the country, or your visa, which they might want to know if they thought you had overstayed your visa. However, tourists usually don't get mistaken for illegal immigrants.

Canberra, Australia
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27. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

bvlenci

When we arrived in Rome in April last year our passport was not stamped. We carried our passports with us every day . The only way we could have proven when we arrivedi n Italy was an email for our air tickets that was on the ipad at the apartment . When we arrived in Milan back from the UK and wanted our passport stamped the man got very cranky and waived us thru still with no stamp. As you stay tourists are very rarely mistaken for illegal immigrants but it was always a concern for me as our 90 day stay in the schengen zone was a close run thing and we left with two days to spare..

Appreciate your advice on what a person could do if the issue arose

Jann58

Edited: 04 May 2014, 13:23
Le Marche, Italy
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for Rome, Marche
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28. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

You should always make sure they stamp your passport. Some people have had trouble leaving from airports in other European countries, precisely because their passports weren't stamped in Italy.

Miami Beach, Florida
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29. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

I have been to hotels that hold your passport overnight. So I'm not carrying it with me for one day....

I wear a flat pouch that can fit my passport, credit card, ATM card and cash. It's supposed to be worn around the neck, but I expand the strap and wear it would my waist with the pouch inside my pants.

Le Marche, Italy
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for Rome, Marche
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30. Re: wallets, money pouches, gadgets, security

I would never let a hotel hold my passport overnight. They just need to copy a few things into the form they have to turn over to the police. If they can't do it while you wait, you should ask them to photocopy it so you can take it back, or at the very least let you pick it up within a short time. One hotel owner in Spain wanted to hold our passports until we checked out to make sure we didn't skip out without paying, but my husband told him it was illegal to do so and he changed his mind.