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Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

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Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

With so many beautiful mountains to drive thought, we were wondering if our GPS Garmin navigation system and cell phone would work or if the signals would be blocked out?

Selva di Val...
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1. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Hi Chocobill,

unless you're in a really obscure gully somewhere then everything should work fine here. They've managed to hide the masts so there are plenty around but don't spoil the landscape too much

DD

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2. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Thanks, The guys were not worried about the cell phones but we did want the navigation system to work properly. As for this area is there a best way to get from Cortina d'Ampezzo to Castelrotto? We have plotted out a route taking SR48 to SS242 through Ortisei and taking SP64 to Castelrotto. If this is the best scenic route - GREAT, if not, please let me know. Thanks again,

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3. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Hi,

Great driving route! We've done this route and parts of it many times, as recently as last September. The highlights for us were the Falzarego and Gardena Passes. The Gardena Pass in particular is spectacular! Along the Falzarego, there's the Lagazuoi cable car trip. We did this, but driving the Gardena Pass easily takes the place of a cable car trip, in my opinion. You'll find a restaurant/cafe at the "top" of the Gardena Pass. Nice to stop, have a coffee and take in the scenery. Not the best coffee we've had but you had to buy something to use the rest room.

If you like spectacuar scenery (and some twisty roads), you'll love driving the route you have planned. We (ok, I) need drive a pass or two on every trip!

Another option could be when you reach Corvara, Alta Badia, take the Campolongo Pass to Arabba and then the Pordoi Pass to the Sella Pass into the Val Gardena and then to Castelrotto. More passes to drive and while we think the Sella Pass is great drive with terrfic scenery, I'd still go with the route that includes the Gardena Pass (your route).

Daisy... I read this on www.alpineroads.com this morning. Do know if this is right and if would be an inconvenience?

Road closed until 30th July 2010 : Grödnerjoch - Corvara at Kolfuschg due to them building a new bridge. Local diversion in place. Expect a delay.

Paul

PS... driving this route is very easy even without a navigation system. You'll notice, there's basically one main road that goes through each valley. Signs are very clear (and in 3 languages, not English) so if you know where you want to be heading towards, you'll have no troubles. We never use a GPS and don't even bother with maps anymore in the Dolomites. It's easy. have a great trip.

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4. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Thanks Paul, One last questions from our wives. When we get to Arabba, we can travel to Passo Pordoi (bypassing Canazel) or Passo di Camplongo - Which one of these routes has the fewest hairpin turns? Also where can we get a great map of just this region? Thanks again for all your help, Bill

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5. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Hi Bill,

My opinion, I'd still go via Falzarego, through Alta Badia and then the Gardena Pass as you originally planned.

You ask:

"When we get to Arabba, we can travel to Passo Pordoi (bypassing Canazel) or Passo di Camplongo..."

It's not either the Pordoi OR the Campolongo, as upon reaching Corvara, you'd first drive the Campolongo Pass to Arabba, THEN drive the Pordoi Pass towards Canazei and THEN drive the Sella Pass towards the Val Gardena. That route includes driving 3 passes.

Your original plan was to reach Corvara and drive the Gardena Pass into Val Gardena and then onto Castelrotto.

I'd still go with driving to Corvara/Colfosco and taking the Gardena Pass. The Falzarego doesn't have many hairpin turns at all. Gardena has a number of places with switchbacks but the scenery is amazing.

To answer your (wives) question... driving 3 passes will have more hairpin turns than driving 1 pass. I'm not including the Falzarego Pass (at least what you'll be driving) as it doesn't have many hairpin turns at all.

Map, we used to use a Michelin Map from Barnes and Noble. What I did to make it easier to read was:

I folded it to just the area we'd be driving and had an enlarged (11" X 17") color copy made made of just that area. You can do this at Office depot, etc.

To see the area more clearly, go to www.viamichelin.com and under "display your map" type in Ortisei and then move the map around by clicking on it and using the "hand".

There is a way to avoid the passes altogether, but it adds time and miles to your trip. Plus you'd miss the "most scenic areas".

Cortina to La Villa, Alta Badia, to Brueck/Brunico to Brixen/Bressanone to Castelrotto. Even this way you'd find twisty roads here and there.

I hope this helped.

Paul

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6. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Paul, I'm getting more confused. My map shows that at Arabba (AR48) if we head north we go through Passo di Camplongo on SS244 to Corvara in Badia at which time we turn onto SS243 and go through Passo di Gardena and down to La Villa / Stern.

If we go west through Arabba SR48 takes us to Passo Pordoi and Passo di Sella coming into La Villa / Stern from the south. Look's like the SS244 & SS243 has a few less hairpin turns.

Look's like it maybe time to get a real map although both routes are shown on my route planner?

Bill

Edited: 12 July 2010, 20:14
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7. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Hi Bill,

"My map shows that at Arabba (AR48) if we head north we go through Passo di Camplongo on SS244 to Corvara in Badia at which time we turn onto SS243 and go through Passo di Gardena and down to La Villa / Stern".

This is almost correct. Yes, from Arabba you take the Campolongo Pass to Coravra (Alta Badia) and then the S243 over the Gardena Pass into Val Gardena. La Villa/Stern is in Alta Badia, 15 minutes from Coravara in the opposite direction (east of Corvara and the Gardena Pass). From Corvara, over the Gardena Pass, you'll first enter Val Gardena at Selva/Wolkenstein.

"If we go west through Arabba SR48 takes us to Passo Pordoi and Passo di Sella coming into La Villa / Stern from the south. Look's like the SS244 & SS243 has a few less hairpin turns."

Again, La Villa/Stern is in Alta Badia, not Val Gardena. From the Sella Pass you'll still enter the Val Gardena at Selva/Wolkenstein.

My question is: how are you getting to Arabba from Cortina d'Ampezzo? From what I know, you can only get from Cortina to Arabba via Andraz/Pieve di Livinallongo (sr48) or via the Giau Pass to Andraz/Pieve di Livinallongo (sr48) to Arabba.

My point with taking your original route was if you're looking to avoid the most hairpin turns, by going to Arabba and taking the Pordoi and Sella Passes, you're taking 2 passes (with hairpin turns) as opposed to JUST the Gardena Pass.

Just my opinion again... if you want to limit driving the most passes:

From Cortina drive the Falzarego (a rather "tame" pass) into Alta Badia. You'll drive through the villages of S. Cassiano/St. Kassian, La Villa/Stern, Coravara and Colfosco then over the Gardena Pass into Val Gardena's 3 villages... Selva/Wolkenstein, St. Christina and Ortisei/St. Ulrich and on to Castelrotto. The only pass with a pretty good amount of hairpin turns is the Gardena.

By including Arabba to your route, you need to drive 2 or 3 passes to get to the Val Gardena.

Sorry to confuse you, but your first post:

"Looking over many maps of this region, there appears to be a few routes to get from Cortina d"Ampezzo to Castelrotto. Which route would be the most scenic? From our view point it appears to be SR48 to SS242."

still makes the most sense to me. On this route, only the Gardena Pass has hairpin turns. Any other route includes more passes, and I have to say, hairpin turns are hard (impossible) to avoid on the Dolomite Passes.

Paul

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8. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Hi, I think the problem is arising here because we're confusing the Falzrego Pass and the Valparola Pass.

From Cortina, you'd head up to the area known as Lagazuoi.

From here, you either take the right fork (Valparola Pass) down to Armentarola, St. Cassiano, La Villa, Corvara then Gardena Pass to the Val Gardena.

Or, you take the left fork - the Falzarego Pass - and head down towards Arabba. From here the choice is either the Passo Campolungo and the Passo Gardena, or the Passo Pordoi and the Passo Sella.

Does this make it any clearer?

DD

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9. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

The Valparola Pass!

I was confusing the Lagazuoi area with the Falzarego pass.

Thanks DD!

Paul

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10. Re: Navigation & Phone Service - Dolomites/Castelrotto Region

Thanks, Now I understand the two choices. Bill

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