We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Venice in a wheelchair?

New York City, New...
Level Contributor
74 posts
9 reviews
Save Topic
Venice in a wheelchair?

Hi. Planned a trip for my parents: Venice, Florence, Rome and Sorrento, 13days. My mom just recently fractured and dislocated her ankle and can not walk. Any thoughts as to whether we can still take her if dad and I take turns pushing the wheelchair? This was their first time out of the country, and my dad's 65th bday. Are things wheelchair accessible? Please advise. I saw the recent post re: Rome, and am a little more hopeful at the moment, but not sure if this is realistic for a bus trip.

Geneva, Switzerland
Level Contributor
2,290 posts
38 reviews
Save Reply
1. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g187870-i57-k38299…

Take look at above.

Geneva, Switzerland
Level Contributor
2,290 posts
38 reviews
Save Reply
2. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g187870-i57-k38299…

Take look at above.

Level Contributor
18 posts
6 reviews
Save Reply
3. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

We have taken my parents to Europe, and they both are in wheelchairs.

My Thoughts:

It can be done, but allow yourself lots of time, and the more people to help, the better.

If you're pushing the wheelchair, then you'll need extra people to help with the luggage.

The streets in some cities are stone/brick, so it is quite bumpy. There are lots of bridges in Venice, so they will need to get out of the wheelchairs, climb the stairs, then get back in.

The crowds can be quite rough, and they are not very accomodating to handicapped. The vaporetti in Venice are so crowded, that it can be quite dificult.

I would definitely use the lightweight, collapsible wheelchairs. Be sure to check with the bus service, and let them know that you will have a wheelchair. We took 2 chairs on a cruise, and some of the cities were easier than others.

Good Luck!

Ireland
Level Contributor
1,905 posts
108 reviews
Save Reply
4. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

You would need to speak to your doctor, as I'm not sure if it's advisable to fly for long periods with a fracture?

If you get the OK for the plane, then I'd say go for it!

Enjoy yourselves

K

Geneva, Switzerland
Level Contributor
2,290 posts
38 reviews
Save Reply
5. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

Kathleen, looks like our voting has worked. I hope mste, the poster provided importan infos from her experience will see that too.

Chorley, United...
Destination Expert
for Venice
Level Contributor
18,683 posts
119 reviews
Save Reply
6. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

Venice is not the easiest place for the disabled but it is possible.

The water bus (vaporetti) staff are very helpful with the disabled. They will help you on and off and clear a space for you if necessary. So travelling round Venice is greatly eased if you use this service and using a wheelchair is certainly possible.

The problem with wheelchairs is the bridges. A very few are equipped with chair lifts for which a key is required - obtainable form the main tourist office in San Marco Piazza. For the majority of bridges it is often a matter of hauling the wheelchair up the steps, brute strength is necessary so only you can tell how feasible this will be.

Hotels can be a problem as quite a number are in old buildings and do not have lifts. Do check our hotel has a lift and it is large enough to take a wheelchair.

My wife and I are both mildly disabled with the onset of arthritis in our old age and always book a first floor room ina hotel with a shallow flight of stairs so we can haul ourselves up slowly. Other than that we have no problems but a fractured ankle and a wheelchair will require patience and a certain ingenuity.

New York City, New...
Level Contributor
74 posts
9 reviews
Save Reply
7. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

Thank you all soo very much! We are going back to the md tomorrow for an xray and a last plea. We shall see. If he gives her a walking boot, I think we will go for it. I'm motivated to do what it takes to get the job done so we can all be there together. As long as she doesn't hurt, I'll push and lift and facilitate. Thanks for the maps and advice!

London
Level Contributor
53 posts
124 reviews
Save Reply
8. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

Hi,

I took my father to Venice in a wheelchair last year and found the whole experience quite exhausting. The best way to travel around is by boat - the regular boat service up and down the main canal is wheelchair accessible. This takes you to/from St Marks Square, which is also fine for wheelchairs, and to the Rialto, where the restaurants beside the bridge are also fine for a wheelchair user. However, a quick look at the map will show you just how many bridges there are. Hauling a wheelchair up and down the steps, particularly when Venice is crowded, is a complete nightmare. Florence, on the other hand, would be fine.

Good luck

Diane

New York City, New...
Level Contributor
74 posts
9 reviews
Save Reply
9. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

Ok, don't yell. We're going! We got the go-ahead from the doctor just this Friday. Wheel-chair and a walking boot over the cast for stairs only! So, here is my question, in trying to do some LAST MINUTE planning: The hotel the tour is putting us in is Ambasciatori in Mestre. We enter by private boat, and spend part of the day, but then have to get back by ourselves if we do not do one of their optional excursions for the remainder of the day/evening. This is the night of my dad's bday, so I want to try to find something on our own. How do we get back to the hotel? Thank you alll so much!

London
Level Contributor
206 posts
95 reviews
Save Reply
10. Re: Venice in a wheelchair?

Thought we'd better join in as well having missed most of the above through being in Milan for a few days (where it was considerably easier to get around and I've just posted our experiences on that site). It is feasible to get round Venice; we did it and survived. One thing you may like to consider: a walking stick and a wheelchair are difficult to manage - I've taken to using a folding walking stick - it's adjustable for height, it folds into about four sections, a couple of rubber bands hold it together for storage and slips into a bag. Most disabled equipment shops carry them and they come in a range of patterns and colours. Best of luck with your visit!