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Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

Leawood, Kansas
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Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

can you? If not, why is this?

thanks in advance.

Florence, Italy
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1. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

No, you're not allowed to take photographs of David in the Accademia gallery I believe (or so says a friend of mine who works at the Accademia) because of copyright laws. Photography flashes at David are invariably going to cause problems to the paintings that surround the sculpture as well, though not to the sculpture itself. Somehow people tend to take photographs anyway, whether or not they know it's not allowed, until the custodians scream at the top of their lungs, "NO PHOTO!" and threaten to take cameras away.

Leawood, Kansas
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2. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

Thanks for your reply. That's a shame.

Florence, Italy
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3. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

Well, you can always take photographs of the copy in Piazza Signoria. It's not the same I know, but it's a great picture as well with Palazzo Vecchio in the background.... then of course you can buy the postcard at the Gallery (another reason perhaps they don't let you take photos? haha) :)

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4. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

It's not another reason. That's what copyright laws are all about.

St Paul, MN
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5. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

None of the musuems in Florence allow you to take pictures. While in Rome, as long as you are not using a flash, you can snap away. It defies reason. There is no real reason why if you can take pictures of Laocoon in rome (which is about 1600 years older) that you shoud not be able to take pcitures of David in Flryence without a flash. The copyrights on all these originals ran out long ago before copyright law existed. if the museums has any copyright held bby the musuem it would be on the restored or cleansed product that the museum paid to have done.

But you just have to respect the wishes of the Museums that you are visiting.

Another annoying thing in Florence is how many churches make you pay admission (all the ones in Rome are free), and then often they don't let you take any pictures in there (even without your flash) after you paid to be let in.

St Paul, MN
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6. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

Wikepedia on EU copyright

"Duration of protection

The rights of authors are protected within their lifetime and for seventy years after their death (Art. 1, D. 93/98/EEC): this includes the resale rights of artists (Art. 8, D. 2001/84/EC). For films and other audiovisual works, the seventy year period applies from the last death among the following people, whether or not they are considered to be authors of the work by the national law of the Member State: the principal director (who is always considered to be an author of the audiovisual work), the author of the screenplay, the author of the dialogue and the composer of music specifically created for use in the cinematographic or audiovisual work (Art. 2, D. 93/98/EEC"

Michelangelo has been dead a lot longer than 70 years.

Norwich, Norfolk, Uk
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7. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

What would be a real shame is if we were not able to access the churches at all because they couldn't afford to keep them open to the public, or if wonderful frescoes and works of art couldn't beprotected or restored because of lack of funds.

I don't know how Rome's funding works compared to Florence's but you can bet your life that the few euros asked of us are going to enable Florence's treasures to be around for future generations to enjoy. I really don't know how anyone can begrudge paying such a small amount to access such beauty.

Greve in Chianti...
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8. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

Thank you, PeggyPatch.

I don't know how it works in Rome, just outside the Vatican's doors, but in Florence funds for the maintenance, let alone restoration, of the monumental churches do not arrive from the Holy See. Nor does Papi Silvio think very much of sending any money this way. So if visitors are asked to fork over a few euros in order to see some of the world's most beautiful (and important, if you think about it) art... please don't gripe.

Think of yourselves as patrons of the arts.

St Paul, MN
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9. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

I don't mind paying to get into a church. I leave money at all the Rome churches I visit if I have change, either in collections box..light boxes, or I light candles and put money in there. What I dont' like is paying to go inside and not being able to take pictures (without my flash).

The way I see it, you can have the "don't take pictures because this is a House of God" OR " this is a repository of fine art, so we are charging you to see it and keep it up". Not both.

In larger churches in Rome (like Santa Maria in Trastevere , there are light boxes in the church. You put in coins in order tyo light up the ceiling, the nave. And while it is lit up I take pictures. I go to banks and get coins on purpose (20 euros at a time) for putting in the light boxes.

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Leawood, Kansas
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10. Re: Michelangelo's David - taking pictures

How long has this been an issue (that of not being able to take pictures)?

It's interesting the dichotomy between the two cities (Rome and Florence) as it relates to this issue. It's unfortunate that it exists in any city, let alone one with the history of Florence.