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Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

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Gainesville, Florida
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Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

I believe the Boboli Gardens are behind the Palazzo Pitti?

Can you walk the gardens for free or is there an entry fee?

San Clemente...
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1. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

There is an entry fee for visiting the Boboli Gardens. The prices are going to vary depending if you want to visit any of the other museums associated with Pitti Palace with a combined ticket.

Chicago, Illinois
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2. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Yes, it's part of the Pitti Palace. The Pitti Palace is split into two halves. Half the attractions in the palace on one admission and half are on the other admission so the cost will depend if you buy just the half that contains the Gardens or the other half, too.

Florence, Italy
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3. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Ok, here's the inside skinny on Boboli. Unless you're a resident of the city of Florence, yep - you have to pay to get in. Otherwise, the ticket costs €7 and gets you into Boboli as well as the Silver, Porcelain and Costume Museums. You also get into the Bardini Gardens, which (between you and me) I like much better. There are also combo tickets available: €8,50 for the Palatine, Modern Art Galleries and Boboli, and €11,50 for the whole of Palazzo Pitti. This last one is good for 3 days, but you should check to make sure of opening times because not all galleries are open at the same time. HOWEVER, when there's a temporary exhibit going on anywhere in Pitti, that combo ticket is off limits. Not knowing when you'll be here, I can't help you with this. But here's the website so you can sort all this out: polomuseale.firenze.it/en/musei/index.php…

Florence
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4. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Eugene:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe admission to the Boboli, to the other parts of the Pitti Palace, and, in fact, to all of the National Museums is free for all EU citizens under the age of 18 or over the age of 65.

Greater London...
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5. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

I believe you're right, Uncletomaso, this also applies to EU students upon production of their student card.

Oldies such I am can recall a time when there was no charge to visit the gardens, I can remember many a sunny lunch time sitting in them with a picnic - I don't think you are allowed to take food there now, which is quite understandable.

Greater London...
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6. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Re. above, I think students have to show their passport as well as their student card.

Florence, Italy
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7. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Now that you bring my attention to it, UncleT, the matter of EU citizens vs. Florence residents is unclear. When look at the Boboli Gardens page on the Polo Museale Fiorentino's website in Italian it says," L'accesso al Giardino di Boboli per i residenti del Comune di Firenze è libero, è però necessario esibire un documento d'identità all'ingresso" (Access to the Boboli Gardens is free for residents of Florence, however ID has to be shown for admission). When I look on the English mirror of the same page, a pop-up comes up, in Italian, saying, "Hanno diritto al biglietto gratuito: I cittadini dell'Unione europea di età inferiore a 18 anni e superiore a 65 anni. I visitatori minori di anni 12 devono essere accompagnati" (EU citizens under 18 and over 65 years of age are entitled to free entrance. Minors under 12 must be accompanied [by an adult]). Viva la burocrazia italiana!

I will call the Polo Museale when its offices open on Tuesday and try to unscramble this mystery.

Castellina in...
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8. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

I'm not sure how well they police this. I go there free because I'm an oldie although I'm not an EU citizen. I also take my lunch - don't know if that's against the rules or not but it's one of the most relaxing places for lunch in Florence. (They say running water calms lunatics - perhaps that's why I always dine with a view of a fountain).

Florence, Italy
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9. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Boboli Garden. Maybe it will be interesting to know something about, not so obvious (non così scontato). In fact, it is not just a garden to simply walk inside, as every other garden. If you like just to walk inside a city garden, there are other wonderful gardens or parks like Cascine, or San Salvi, and many other in Florence. Boboli it's an important museum, and an ancient garden; that's why they charge entrance. And by the way, it is sure, very beautiful to just walk inside Boboli, but you lose something not to considering it a real museum. It's full of artworks, and best thing is to get information about these artworks, before you go; moreover, because you pay the entrance.

The list of artworks is long, anyway you find works by ancient roman sculptors quite everywhere; for example, you find a statue of Demetra, a roman copy from greek Alcamene; statues and buildings by Pietro Tacca, Giambologna, Zanobi del Rosso, GIovanni Caccini, il Tribolo, Baccio Bandinelli, Valerio Cioli, Bernardo Buontalenti, Igor Mitoraj, Romolo del Tadda, Alfonso and Giulio Parigi, Vincenzo Danti, Pasquale Poccianti, Vincenzo de' Rossi, Giorgio Vasari. You can really take a whole day searching for all their works inside, with a good map.

It's a pity that Boboli it is not appreciated for the value it has, i.e. something like an ancient artwork of "land art", a huge land art oeuvre, with artists from many centuries designing not only its palaces, buildings, grottos and statues, but also the garden itself.

Bardini garden it's wonderful, too; but it is very little compared to Boboli, and while Bardini has mostly a trace (impronta) from more recent periods, (XIX century), that's why it's designed as "all'inglese", the english way, Boboli is one of the latest remains of more ancient classic garden, as it is said, "all'italiana", the italian way. And Bardini has nothing from big artists like Giambologna or Buontalenti, which were really among the Florence's greatest artists, of every time.

It is also, maybe, interesting to know about the "free entrance for residents". Some years ago the entrance was free for everyone. The garden needs to be under surveillance, though. This happens because there is people taking flowers or damaging plants, or worse, writing on the roman statues or buildings. It happens unfortunately, and guardians are everywhere inside the garden, and, obliged to spent all their time stopping uneducated people, some of them are also maybe too much nervous and not so nice with people visiting, even when they simply, inadvertently approach a flowerbed (aiola), for instance - I can understand guardians' work it's not so easy, but personally I don't agree with being unpleasant (antipatico). Anyway, maintenance and surveillance cost and finally some years ago italian State decided to charge the entrance for the garden. That was a bad news primarly for Oltrarno people where the garden is; because the Boboli area has not so many green areas, and children and their mothers especially, living near the Garden, they used since years to go in the Boboli area near Porta Romana, the Prato delle Colonne, just to bring their kids taking some air, inside a garden for some hours a day. You can read about the matter in many newspapers articles, as a polemic (polemica) broke out. After some "polemiche", State decided to leave this free entrance for florentine residents, just from the Porta Romana access to the garden; florentines trying to get in the garden from the main Pitti entrance, they are more or less kindly invited to go to Porta Romana entrance... So that's why. every day, winter or summer, cold or heat, you'll find mothers with strollers (passeggini) and children with nonni in the Boboli grass Prato delle Colonne near Porta Romana, as it was before the charging fee.

Notice that the large, large part of florentines, the very, very vast part of them...., doesn't go in Boboli. They don't take advantage at all of this "wonderful" free entrance. Florentines simply don't use to go to Boboli. They don't care at all. Yep, it's so. They visited Boboli when they were middle school students, as every other florentine kid, brought there by their teachers. And now, free or not, they don't care at all about Boboli garden. I'm one of the rare florentine people enjoyng the free entrance I think, and to visit it as a museum and not to bring in my kids, which I have not, or because I'm an Oltrarno resident, which I'm not. I like a lot to get lost inside the garden, and to explore it, searching for instance that ancient roman statue that I have never seen, or that other piece of ancient middle age wall I never visited. I wonder why florentines don't enjoy more of the Garden, but it seems, that having visited two or three time it, the last one in the '80, it's all they need. And even me, which I'm very interested, last time I went there, it was something like two years ago...

So the "residents" who benefit the free entrance are just these oltrarno inhabitants, in fact! And, let me say, it's nothing but a good idea, leaving them the free entrance.

By the way, residents means "Florence citizens". if you live in Sesto Fiorentino, or Scandicci, or Fiesole, or even Compiobbi just 100 meters out the Florence city you have to pay, just as everyone.

And, notice again, if I want to see the Museo degli Argenti, which is included with the Boboli ticket, I have obviously as florentine, to pay, as everyone. About the Museo degli Argenti, don't undervalue it; it's wonderful, retaing a part of the Medici Treasure, and if you bought the ticket for Boboli garden, it's absolutely a nonsense not to visit it!!!

Florence, Italy
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10. Re: Is there a charge to walk the Boboli Gardens?

Eugene: it's exactly as you read, I don't see anything of extremely "bureaucratic", or so incomprehensible in Polo Museale website, about Boboli, or in contradiction between the English and the Italian page. What makes you perplexed? There is a rather long list of cases, of people allowed to get a free admission in Boboli, and the website just diligently reports them all. The very big problem I think, it's that this long page is not translated in English, it seems; this should be done, I think. If you call them Tuesday, tell them it would be a good idea to translate this page with the list.

It's a long list, here it is:

Hanno diritto al biglietto gratuito:

I cittadini dell'Unione europea di età inferiore a 18 anni e superiore a 65 anni. I visitatori minori di anni 12 devono essere accompagnati

I gruppi di studenti delle scuole italiane statali e non statali e degli altri Stati appartenenti all'Unione europea, accompagnati dai loro insegnanti, previa prenotazione, nel contingente stabilito dal capo dell'istituto

I docenti e gli studenti delle facoltà di architettura, di conservazione dei beni culturali, di scienze della formazione e dei corsi di laurea in lettere o materie letterarie con indirizzo archeologico o storico-artistico delle facoltà di lettere e filosofia, delle facoltà o corsi corrispondenti istituiti negli Stati membri dell'Unione Europea (gli studenti devono presentare un valido certificato d'iscrizione in lingua italiana, gli stranieri in inglese per l'anno accademico in corso)

I docenti e gli studenti delle Accademie di belle arti o corrispondenti istituti dell'Unione Europea (gli studenti devono presentare certificato d'iscrizione in lingua italiana o inglese per l'anno accademico in corso)

Le guide turistiche dell'Unione europea nell'esercizio della propria attività professionale (esibire una valida licenza, rilasciata dalla competente autorità)

Gli interpreti turistici dell'Unione europea, quando occorra la loro opera a fianco della guida (esibire una valida licenza rilasciata dalla competente autorità)

i cittadini dell'Unione europea portatori di handicap e ad un loro familiare o ad altro accompagnatore che dimostri la propria appartenenza a servizi di assistenza socio-sanitaria

Gli operatori delle associazioni di volontariato che svolgano, in base a convenzioni in essere stipulate con il Ministero ai sensi dell'articolo 112, comma 8, del Codice, attività di promozione e diffusione della conoscenza dei beni culturali

Per ragioni di studio e di ricerca, attestate da istituzioni scolastiche o universitarie, da accademie, da istituti di ricerca e di cultura italiani o stranieri, nonché da organi del Ministero per i Beni e le Attività culturali, ovvero per particolari e motivate esigenze, i capi degli istituti possono consentire ai soggetti che ne facciano richiesta l'ingresso gratuito per periodi determinati

Per le ragioni e le esigenze di cui al comma 4, i direttori generali competenti per materia possono rilasciare a singoli soggetti tessere di durata annuale di ingresso gratuito a tutti gli istituti ed i luoghi di cui al comma 1, nonché individuare - previo parere del comitato regionale per i servizi di biglietteria - categorie di soggetti alle quali consentire, per determinati periodi, l'ingresso gratuito ai medesimi luoghi

Il personale del Ministero per i Beni e le Attività culturali

I membri dell'ICOM (International Council of Museums)

Ai cittadini di Stati non facenti parte dell'Unione europea, si applicano, a condizione di reciprocità, le disposizioni sull'ingresso gratuito

The other problem can be that the free admission seems to concern only European Citizens, and for the free admission, if you are 65 and you came from USA or Australia, it seems you have not it. About not European countries, maybe the most important phrase it's the last one, meaning something like "to the citizens not being from European Union, free admission is applied, on a reciprocal base", this means if a State signed an agreement with Italy, to allow for instance Italian tourists more than 65 visiting this other country, to get in to State museums. It is also possible Usa or Australia signed such an agreement, who knows? Anyway, it's a matter of agreement between states; it seems, that all European countries have agreed to free admission for aged citizens, in their state museums, no matter which state museum, in which European country, and no matter from which EU country the aged citizens arrive.

Good thing European Union... sometimes!