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Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

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Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

I'm interested in knowing if anyone has cycled the Herzroute from Lausanne to Zug? I will be traveling with another companion next month and we're planning to spend a week cycling this route. I'm wondering if anyone has any advice/suggestions for things to see/eat/do on the way or any "lessons learned" they'd like to pass along.

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1. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Unfortunately, I can't help with this route, although I've just had a look at the map and it looks interesting. On the off chance that you change your mind and want to do route 9 (Lakes Route), although I'm not a cyclist, I do know lots of nice things to do in the general area along sections 1 and 2.

Hopefully by bumping this up, a cyclist will be along with some Herzroute tips.

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2. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Thank you for your response and the bump. Now that I'm looking at the map for both routes, I wonder if it's possible to combine the routes where we start out on the Lakes Route and then switch over to the Herzroute around the Spiez/Thun area.

Either way, I would love to hear your suggestions for things to do along the Lakes Route.

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3. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Some options for section one of the Lakes route:

If you do do the lakes route, I would very much recommend starting at Mont Pelerin (you can see that this is an option on the map). You take the funicular up from Vevey (go to Vevey lake path, face the lake, turn right cycle along lake path, when you reach big glass Nestle building, turn right, cross roundabout in front, pass underneath 2 railway lines next to each other, funicular station two minutes up road). If you take the funicular up this saves what I imagine would be a long hard slog up through the vinyards on a fairly busy road to the plain.

When you reach Chatel St. Denis (the first big town you hit on the plain), stop and buy a tarte au citron from the bakery next to the roundabout in the town square. This is a particularly fine tarte au citron. They also do nice custard cones. If you want to see a really creepy statue, do the following: At the roundabout in the town square, the cycle route goes to the left. Instead of going left, take the road straight on, heading slightly up hill with shops either side. After about a minute, there's a parking area on the right in front of a convent/religious building. There you can see the statue of a dying soldier being helped by an angel. It used to scare the living daylights out of me as a child.

When you reach Semsales, consider stopping off at the tea rooms and if the dairy is open, you can learn about cheese making:

les-paccots.ch/en/…cheese-factory.html

After this, if you'd like to briefly leave the main route for a stop off in a farm buvette and/or a walk around a forest with carved wooden statues, do as follows: Look at the map. After La Verrerie on the cycle route, follow the route with your finger and look on the map for where the train track is. On the map you'll see H. du Cret (halt du Cret, the name of a tiny shed of a train station). You are not going to this station, but it will help you find where you need to be on the map. You need to leave the main cycle route and take a left turn up a road called Chemin du Grand Pra. It is signposted. On the map this road is exactly to the left of where it says 837. Head steadily uphill at all times until you reach a bigger T-junction, where you'll see a big farm buvette (cafe) signposted (Les Obasseires, closed Mondays). On the map, the buvette is not shown, but it is just above where the word Le Gendre is.

If you want to walk around the forest, instead of turning left and going to to buvette, turn right at the T-junction (road called Montborget). Follow the road for a minute or two and enter the forest (there's a pedestrian entrance with a small sign about not littering etc and a parking area and entrance slightly further on with some carved animals).

les-paccots.ch/en/SummerActivities/natural-s…

Bulle is the regional capital and is a pretty mid sized town. There is an interesting regional history museum in the library which has recently refurbished. Hopefully they are still displaying the wolf net for catching wolves back in the day. Otherwise, there are plenty of nice restaurants and cafes to choose from.

http://www.musee-gruerien.ch/

Some options for section 2:

After Bulle, you follow the route towards Gruyeres. Gruyeres is a fun stop off. There's the demonstration cheese dairy next to the station and the beautiful Medieval old town up on the hill. It has a chateau and the HR Giger museum (if you like the Alien films). Alternatively, if you'd like a break, you can leave your bikes (I would think there's somewhere to lock them up by Gruyeres station) and take the bus up to Moleson village (bus from right behind the station). There's a fun park with grass carting and a summer luge. The main draw is the funicular and new cable car to the top of Moleson mountain. This will give you an excellent overview of the whole area. Beautiful views on a clear day. If you want to check timings for this, use www.rail.ch and your "from" point is Gruyeres, gare. Your "to" point is Le Moleson (the summit of the mountain at the top of the cable car).

After Gruyeres, I get less knowledgeable. Gstaad is very pretty and is a nice place to pretend to be rich and famous. Swandav and Neuch will have more pointers.

You can look up all the main villages and towns in the Fribourg canton tourism website:

http://www.fribourgregion.ch/en/

Have fun even if you don't end up in this region. Let us know how you get on.

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4. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Thank you so much for this! One more question (if I may)...my primary language is English, and I have very very basic French proficiency. I'm told that in the bigger cities, English will suffice but might have some difficulty relying on just English in the areas that are "off the beaten path". Is this true?

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5. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Quite a lot if people do speak some English but it's true that in the less touristy areas you will find it more tricky. However, if you bring a phrase book which you can point to you'll be fine. Remember your route passes through French and German speaking areas.

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6. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Thank you again for all of your information! This has been extremely helpful.

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7. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

Happy to help

8. Re: Cycling the Herzroute (Heart Route)

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