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The Origin of The Hague

Sivakasi, India
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The Origin of The Hague

Why " The" is prefixed before HAGUE?

Sivakasi, India
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1. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Generally :The" will not come before a name of a city,Town or village.

But to the contrary Hague is called as "The Hague" Why?

Colombo, Sri Lanka
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2. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Wikipedia says

"The Hague is first mentioned as Die Hage in a document dating from 1242. In the fifteenth century, the smarter des Graven hage came into use, literally "the count's wood", with connotations like "the count's hedge, private enclosure or hunting grounds". Gravenhage was officially used for the city from the 17th century on. Today this name is only used in some official documents like birth and marriage certificates. The city itself uses "Den Haag" in all its communication.[3]"

And that's about what we learn here too. Similar with Den Bosch / 's Hertogenbosch. We have some towns with a permanent De(n) too like Den Oever and Den Dolder...

All the best,

<Erik> & [Sandya]

Surrey, Canada
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3. Re: The Origin of The Hague

.... and Den Helder as well.

The Hague
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4. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Or Los Angeles, Los Alamos etc. It's more widespread than you'd think.

London
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5. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Use of the definite article in English place-names is far less common than it is in other languages.

There is a similarity with abstract nouns; in English they are not preceded by the definite article (love, liberty), whereas in other languages such as French they are (l'amour, la liberté).

Edited: 12 February 2013, 10:30
Colombo, Sri Lanka
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6. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Yes, that's a good addition. All US names I know of (Los and Las) come from Spanish, and for the Dutch names it's typical for relatively old towns to have this. Most (like Den Helder and Den Oever) don't have an English version but 's Gravenhage happens to have one hence nicely copied.

Tnx,

<Erik> & [Sandya]

Fort Worth, Texas
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7. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Las Vegas is spanish for lost wages

Eindhoven...
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8. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Other widely used prefixes are "ten" and "ter" (both meaning something like "at" or "at the"). But in the current city names, they're often not directly recognizable as prefixes, as they have merged into one word. For example, Terneuzen was called Ter Neuzen before 1940. Terschelling and Terheijden are other examples.

The Hague, The...
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9. Re: The Origin of The Hague

Elsewhere in Europe it is also not uncommon. Think of Le Havre , Le Touquet in France, Las Palmas in Spain and even Britain has places with The in front, see anglotopia.net/ultimate-list-of-funny-britis…

10. Re: The Origin of The Hague

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