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Windmill farms in Crete

London, United...
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Windmill farms in Crete

Crete-lovers will want to know about the latest development in the big Greek sell-off: the authorisation by the Greek government of 9 licences for windmill parks in the mountains of Sfakia, to provide energy for - not Crete, not Greece, but the northern European countries.

Here is a link to a thread about this deplorable development:

www.sfakia-crete.com/forum2/read.php?3,5645

I will post more when I know more.

Devizes, United...
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1. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

Hi alabastron, and thank you for this link

I had no idea that this was about to happen, what a total desecration of a beauitiful, wild part of the island especially when you read about how much electricity these will produce, many, many times more than Crete would ever need. I see the surplus is destined for Athens, the Peloponnese and Germany!! Doesn't Germany have sufficient energy-producing capacity for itself?

The Sfakiots are blessed to inhabit such a lovely part of southern Crete, how will they respond to this dreadful plan? I recall the Sfakiots being renown as fearless warriors, many of then were recruited as "paliakares" during WWII and fought without thought for themselves to rid Crete of the invaders. Maybe this will be a call-to-arms once again for them...?

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2. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

Yes, it's terrible. Crete - and Greece - are being sold off at bargain prices to finance the debt. I'll be surprised if the Sfakiot paliakares don't respond pretty forcefully - but they have no power, and I don't think there is any hope of reversing this. The German-French juggernaut is simply too powerful.

(And it's not just Sfakia: the plotters seem to have their eye on all the mountainous regions of Crete.)

Crete and Greece are for sale now. It's rape: there is no better word for it.

There will be a petition, and I'll post a link to it here when it comes.

Devizes, United...
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3. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

I'll be the first to add my name.....

Windsor, United...
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4. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

What's been written is true and depressing. If Nikos Kazantzakis were alive I wander what he would say ?

Kirkwall
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5. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

Stefanos, our host, says 'there is no law in Sfakia'. I hope, in this case, this is true.

6. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

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Devizes, United...
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7. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

and again....

London, United...
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8. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

Thanks Steve and GB. This really is a major issue, so keep bumping. :-)

Incidentally, GB, you said you had no idea this was about to happen. Nobody did. The decisions to offer the licences were made with - as far as we can tell - NO consultation, certainly not with the Cretans who live in the areas about to be blighted. This is one of the more disgusting things about an appalling situation.

Apparently there were plans to site wind farms somewhere in France, but the people in the proposed area protested, so the French government fastened on poor Crete, whose people are in no position to say "no" to anything the Greek government decides to do to reduce the sacred debt.

I had better stop before I'm kicked off the forum for getting political.

Edited: 31 October 2011, 22:39
Devizes, United...
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9. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

Alabastron, according to the BBC 10 o'clock news, the Greek government will be holding a referendum in "the next few weeks" regarding the proposed latest rescue deal. Can you see the Greek people voting for it? I can't for one moment, so I think the government is taking a heck of a chance.

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10. Re: Windmill farms in Crete

Good morning GB (I shut down after my last post).

Yes, I know, and I wonder why they're doing it. Buying time in the hope of avoiding an all-out general strike (a possibility given that people are at the end of their patience, and that so many have lost so much that they now have nothing to lose)? Hoping to persuade people that the government is "listening"?

Ah. I've just read the report: www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-15526719

Gavin Hewitt's comments are interesting (follow the link in the report)

"The referendum will only be held after the details of the latest deal with the EU are worked out. That, of course, will enable the Greek government to barter for softer terms in the hope that may sway the voters. ...There will be people who will argue that democracy has once again got in the way of securing a lasting deal to the eurozone debt crisis. But, in the end, the austerity package in exchange for a new bailout could not just be forced on the Greek people. It will have to be argued for."

....

So perhaps it's a clever move?

Edited: 01 November 2011, 06:43