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Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

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Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

Is there a big difference between the standard bertha and luxury bertha on the overnight ferries? Seems to be a 12 hr ride, so if one if a lot better than the other, would pay the extra for it. Also, is there a place to purchase food on these ferries? Thanks

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1. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

Hey KikiNYC10:-) If it's the Blue Star ferry, it's about a 7 hour ride..ferry departs Santorini a bit past midnight..arrives Rhodes early around 7a;-) You'll find a caferia as well a restaurant on the Blue Star..the snack bar/cafeteria offers coffee as well as sandwiches, etc.. When I did this run, there were 4 of us who shared an outside quad w/private WC..it was fun but barely slept for a couple of hours! Depending on your budget, don't see why a standard/inside room wouldn't work..personal call;-) Have fun..and EnjoY!

Essex
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2. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

If it's a 12-hour journey it's presumably the Diagoras which is about 30% slower than Blue Star 1 and 2 and takes a less direct route. I've no personal experience of that ferry but according to the Blue Star web site it has the same catering facilities as Blue Star 1 and 2.

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3. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

Thanks, all. I think the 12 hr one is the only option for the day we need to go. Think I will just pay the extra for whatever luxury is, 12 hrs is a long time to spend in some small quarters. Also, silly question but can you tell me what WC means? Referring to the quarters you described (quad with private WC) Thanks

Sandbach, United...
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4. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

In Amercan WC translates as 'bathroom'. Just why do you call it a bathroom when there's often no bath in there, especially public bathrooms? Just curious.

In English, it's 'toilet', 'loo' etc.

WC is the acronym for the term water closet.

Martin

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5. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

Ha ha! In my area of Canada we call it the "washroom". I learned quickly in Greece to ask where the "toilet" was LOL!

Karen

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6. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

..In the States, you'd never call it a 'toilet'..considered impolite here;-)) I guess since you also wash/bath your hands, bathroom makes sense..Nonetheless, I often wondered where 'loo' comes from?;-)) I heard it first time in England..someone actually came up to ask me where it was..I had no clue what they were talking about..lol!! Live and learn..Keep enjoyin' all!

Edit: LOL..yes Karen..'toualetta';-))

Edited: 05 May 2011, 21:44
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7. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

LOL! "Toualetta" was one of the first on my list of "must knows"!! I too was wondering where "loo" comes from.

Karen

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8. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

As BLL is so fond of saying, Google is your friend -

loo"

(Word Origins)

This British colloquial word for "toilet" was established usage by the 1920s. Suggested origins include:

French _lieu d'aisance_ = "place of easement"

French _On est prie de laisser ce lieu aussi propre qu'on le trouve_ = "Please leave this place as clean as you find it"

French _Gardez l'eau!_ = "Mind the water!" (supposedly said in the days before modern plumbing, when emptying chamber pots from upper-storey windows. According to Chris Malcolm (cam@aifh.ed.ac.uk), this phrase is still sometimes used by common folk in Edinburgh when heaving water or slops, and tour guides say that it originated there circa 1600.)

"louvre" (from the use of slatted screens for a makeshift lavatory)

"bordalou" (an 18th-century ladies' travelling convenience)

"looward" or "leeward" (the sheltered side of a boat)

"lee", a shepherd's shelter made of hurdles

"lieu", as in "time off in lieu", i.e., in place of work done

"lavatory", spoken mincingly

"Lady Louisa Anson" (a 19th-century English noblewoman whose sons took her name-card from her bedroom door and put it on the guest lavatory)

a misreading of room number "100" (supposedly a common European toilet location)

a "water closet"/"Waterloo" joke. (James Joyce's _Ulysses_ (1922) contains the following text: "O yes, _mon loup_. How much cost? Waterloo. water closet."

Make of it what you will.

Martin

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9. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

And again from Google -

...There are many theories about this word, but few firm facts, and its origin is one of the more celebrated puzzles in word history. The one thing everybody agrees on is that it's French in origin, or at least a corruption of a French phrase. But which phase, etymologists are still arguing about. But we're fairly sure it's modern, with its origin having been traced back no further than James Joyce's Ulysses in 1922.

So that seems to dismiss entirely the theory that it comes from the habit of the more caring British housewives, in the days before plumbing, of warning passers-by on the street below with the cry "Gardy loo!" before throwing the contents of their chamber pots out of upstairs windows. (It's said to be a corrupted form of the French gardez l'eau! or "watch out for the water!".) And equally the late date refutes the idea that it comes from the French bordalou, a portable commode carried by eighteenth century ladies in their muffs (you will never again be able to look at a picture of a lady wearing a muff without thinking what she's carrying inside it). It is also said that it's a British mispronunciation of the French le lieu, "the place", a euphemism.

Another theory, a rather more plausible one, has it that it comes from the French lieux d'aisances, literally "places of ease" (the French term is usually plural), once also an English euphemism, which could have been picked up by British servicemen in World War One. But James Joyce may equally well have derived the expression as a punning reference to the battle of Waterloo, from the sequence: water closet--waterloo--loo. Or it may be that several linguistic forces converged to create the new word.

Dont you just love the Englsh language - we're not proud, we'll take words from everyone else and totally screw around with them, then wait for the Americans to change the spelling LOL :-))

Martin

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10. Re: Overnight Ferry Santorini to Rhodos

None of this actually helps the OP, but how many topics stay on topic anyway!

Martin