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Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

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Gatineau, Canada
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Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

Hello, I have read about the smoking policies in Vienna, but specifically would like to know about smoking in coffeehouses and small neighborhood restaurants, and also in the Market building.

Can anyone smoke in any place in these establishments, or are there designated non-smoking areas ? Thank you for any input.

Vienna, Austria
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1. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

By law, a business that serves food or beverages can choose to allow smoking, if it has only one room and the room is smaller than 50 square meters. If it is larger than this or has more than one room it can allow smoking only in designated smoker's areas that have to be constructed in such a way that the smoke cannot enter the non-smoker's section. Also, the smoker's area cannot be larger than the non-smoker's area.

Generally, I've found that by now this law is usually complied with and more and more restaurants and cafes, small ones included, choose to ban smoking altogether.

Here's a list of 229 cafes and restaurants in vienna that completely ban smoking (in German but easy to navigate):

da.stinkts.net/rauchfreie-lokale-in-wien.html

P.s.: Which Market building are you talking about?

Burnley, United...
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2. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

I was amazed to see Cafe Hawelka on the smoke-free list. Is it true? The place will have no atmosphere - the smoke used to hit you as you approached the door! I am passionate about no smoking establishments, but there are some places where it was almost bearable, so indelibly was it part of the history of the place.

Eugene, Oregon
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3. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

Leopold Hawelka must be rolling in his grave.

London, United...
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4. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

For some reason or other I remember an item on Heute when it went no smoking. It is sad but we view Heute every night ......

Vienna, Austria
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5. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

Yes, I was a bit surprised myself but it's apparently true. They tried to claim an exception from the new law on grounds of "Denkmalschutz" (preservation of historic buildings and monuments) but it was denied. So, until they build some kind of structural seperation, Hawelka stays smoke free.

diepresse.com/home/panorama/rauchen/624830/R…

Gatineau, Canada
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6. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

Thank you Felix for the information. It was very useful. From your experience, are there many one-room coffeehouses less than 50 sq meters? Also, I was not referring to any specific market. When I visit cities for the first time, I love walking around neighbourhoods and visiting markets where the locals shop. I usually pick up some food for picnics, or eat at market snack bars, if available. I would appreciate if you would let me know of some neighbourhods to walk and markets to visit, while I am in Vienna. I will be in Vienna for eight days the first week in May.

Toronto, Canada
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7. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

jasam,

You might enjoy a visit to the Naschmarkt.

tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g190454-d1…

Vienna, Austria
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8. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

I wouldn't say there are many coffeehouses that small, especially most of the nice traditional ones are larger than that. In fact, the only one I can think of right now that's smaller than 50 sq meters and allows smoking is the aptly named "Kleines Cafe" (kleines=small). You shouldn't have any problem finding a smoke free cafe especially since many of the most iconic places are now on the list of those that completely ban smoking (Griensteidl, Landtmann, Havelka, Mozart, Cafe Sperl (my favorite), Dommayer,...). In any case, watch out for signs at the doors of coffeehouses and restaurants. A green sign means smoking is allowed, a red sign means smoking is prohibited and both a red and a green sign mean that there are separated smoker's and non-smoker's areas.

As for markets, well, Naschmarkt has been mentioned already and you definitely should go there if you like markets. It's the largest and most famous market in Vienna with a wide selction of food from all over the world and lots of small restaurants and snack-bars. It's also a bit expensive and touristy, though.

If you're a bit more adventurous I'd also advise you to visit Brunnenmarkt in Vienna's 16th district. It's located in one of Vienna's main (Turkish) immigrant areas and that's reflected in the atmosphere there. It's much less fabulous, less expensive and more down to earth that the Naschmarkt. The selection of food is also a bit smaller, centering most around stuff from Turkey, the Balkans, but also traditional Austrian. It's just as lively, though, and I think it's a great place to get a sense of what Viennese life (one aspect of it, anyway) is really like, away from all the Baroque and Jugendstil splendour.

Lastly, another place you might want to consider is the Karmelitermarkt in the 2nd district. It's actually not much of a market during the week but more of a collection of small, interesting restaurants on and around the market square. Only on saturday there is the organic farmer's market that is quite nice. Still, the area is quite interesting by itself. It used to be Vienna's main Jewish quarter and today there is some considerable Jewish life going on there again, although nothing compared to before the war, of course. It has been considered to be Vienna's up and coming "hip" area for years and by now one could probably say that it has arrived. Even the New York Times said so, so it has to be true!

Edited: 23 February 2013, 12:56
9. Re: Smoking in Coffeehouses, etc.

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