We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Ghost Towns of Oregon

Beaverton, Oregon
Level Contributor
24 posts
4 reviews
Save Topic
Ghost Towns of Oregon

People say that "Oregon has more ghost towns then any other state." To prove it, I set out to map every single one I could and this is what I came up with. Note that I have another 50 or so locations to still add to the map.

http://PNWPhotoBlog.com/ghost-towns/

Any corrections, additions, and comments are appreciated.

Oregon
Level Contributor
1,092 posts
44 reviews
Save Reply
1. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

That's a great idea Hamellr. I don't see any that are left out. There are some communities that no longer have services but are still on the map. I'm not sure what the proper definition of "ghost town" is, so I will leave them out but, again, a great idea. I hope it will be useful to travelers and natives alike.

Oregon
Level Contributor
8,735 posts
42 reviews
Save Reply
2. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

Not sure the folks in Condon or Dayville would agree

Oregon Coast
Destination Expert
for Crescent City, Oregon Coast, Oregon, Redwood National Park
Level Contributor
43,393 posts
1,083 reviews
Save Reply
3. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

Hope nobody in Elk City reads that map. Dayville has a lovely little RV park which sure didn't look like a ghost town when we stayed there...

Beaverton, Oregon
Level Contributor
24 posts
4 reviews
Save Reply
4. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

For those of us who "hunt" for Ghost Towns, we use a classification system. Generally any town that has a full time population that is significantly smaller then it was in it's heyday is considered a ghost town. So there are towns on the list that may feel busy but are considered Ghost Towns for that reason. For many years Jacksonville was considered one, although in recent decades it's population has grown quite a bit.

Class A: barren site (Examples, Palmer, Oregon, Kingsley Oregon)

Class B: rubble and/or roofless building ruins

Class C: standing abandoned buildings (with roofs), no population, except maybe a caretaker. (Example Cabell City)

Class D: semi/near ghost towns. A small resident population, many abandoned buildings. (Example, Hamilton)

Class E: busy historic community, yet still much smaller than in its boom years. (Example, Granite )

Class F: Not a stand-alone class, but an addition to any of the above. This class usually designates a restored town, state park, or indicates some other “additional” status. (Example, Golden, Ritter)

Class G: the town joined or was absorbed by a neighboring thriving city. (New Era, Taft)

Class H: Same as Class D, with no or very few original building. (Example, Idanha)

Greenhorn is a perfect example (http://PNWPhotoBlog.com/2011/07/25/ghost-town-of-greenhorn-oregon/ ) At it's height it had a population of 500 or more, not including miners who live in the surrounding area. Now days it has a population of 25 or so people, only about six of whom are full time residents.

Oregon
Level Contributor
1,092 posts
44 reviews
Save Reply
5. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

Interesting hamellr. Vernonia was nearly a ghost town in the late 60s and into the 70s and fits some of the criteria you presented above.

Oregon Coast
Destination Expert
for Crescent City, Oregon Coast, Oregon, Redwood National Park
Level Contributor
43,393 posts
1,083 reviews
Save Reply
6. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

Phirl, I think Toledo might fit into one of those categories, LOL! Taft a ghost town? With all due respect to the "classification system", that's just crazy. True there is no longer a post office with that name, but it's about as far away from a "real" ghost town as any small coastal community. Hotels, restaurants, schools, churches, stores . . .

Oregon
Level Contributor
8,735 posts
42 reviews
Save Reply
7. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

When was growing up in Toledo it had a viable busy downtown. including a big grocery not any more. still a few stores but 2nd hand stores for most part. so that may fit a category all right. Actually so does the old downtown Newport. It too was a busy place. Now the busy is 101.

In Lincoln City the downtown place was Oceanlake. I am having a hard time remembering what Taft was like in those days. not much different I think.

Interesting subject to think about. I also grew up around Heppner, which also had a busy downtown.

Oregon
Level Contributor
8,735 posts
42 reviews
Save Reply
8. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

I well remember when Lincoln City formed. I still call them by their right name, and specially Taft which is sort of separate from rest of Lincoln City. For those who don't remember the towns who merged into Lincoln City were Cutler City, Taft, Nelscott, Delake, Oceanlake. Taft was not absorbed. or if it was all 5 of those places were.

They had a hard time deciding name of city. Oceanlake was the big town but no way would have Taft people accepted that name.

When we lived in John Day, Jaycees made a move to merge Canyon City and John Day. even got it on ballot. It went down in Canyon City. As I recall name was to be John Day.

Oregon Coast
Destination Expert
for Crescent City, Oregon Coast, Oregon, Redwood National Park
Level Contributor
43,393 posts
1,083 reviews
Save Reply
9. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

JC Market grocery is in Toledo as well as the other one by the Chevron station. There is even a brewpub now, next to Pig Feathers ;-)

Beaverton, Oregon
Level Contributor
24 posts
4 reviews
Save Reply
10. Re: Ghost Towns of Oregon

Welcome to the weirdness that is Ghost Town hunting! Generally if it's been absorbed (or become part of,) another city, it's considered a Class G Ghost Town at this point even if there is an active population now that is larger then the original town was.

Much of the fun is peeling back the layers of newness to get to the core town that existed at one time.