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What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Prague, Czech...
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What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Hello all,

we were in UTAH in 2006, but it was beautiful so we would like go there again.

In last visit we travelled to this parks:

Zion (2 days)

Bryce (2 days)

Archers (1 days)

Canyonlands (1 days)

Death horse point (1/4 days)

Monument Valley (1/4 days)

Mexican Hat (1/4 days)

Grand canyon (2 days)

Paria canyon (1 days)

I think, that the most beautiful place was:

1) Paria canyon

2) Archers

3) Canyonland

I want go there again :-)

But what more you recommended me?

Im thinking about:

- goblins valley

- goosnecks

- moke dugway

- little wildhorse canyon

thanks for your inspiration answer

Salt Lake City, Utah
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1. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

You could easily revisit the areas you loved, nothing wrong with that. In fact you'll enjoy them even more.

It would be very easy to combine a trip to Arches and Canyonlands with a visit to Goblin Valley, Little Wildhorse. And depending on how much time you have add in Goosenecks, Moki Dugway and Monument Valley.

You mention Paria, so I assume you have been through Page. Did you stop to see Antelope Canyon?

How much time are you expecting to have?

Prague, Czech...
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2. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Hi,

in antelope canyon, we were too :-)

I Suppose stay only few minutes on goosnecks and Moki Dugway only drive-throw.

To monument valley we would like drive from Moab and sleeping in campground into Monument valley.

And day after we would like continue to Page and lottery about enter paria canyon again :-)

I would like stay in UTAH 10 days and in CALIFORNIA 10 days too.

Salt Lake City, Utah
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3. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Well you didn't mention which section of Canyonlands, but perhaps you could spend some quality time in the Needles Section. There are several great hikes there. Then you could also visit Goosenecks, Moki Dugway, Natural Bridges as well.

If you are coming in from SLC you could easily add in Capitol Reef Natl Park with side trips to Goblin Valley and Little WIld horse before heading over to Moab.

So maybe an itinerary like this:

1-SLC to Moab

2-Arches

3-Other stuff in area (Corona arch, jeeping, rafting???)

4-Moab to Needles area

5-Needles

6- Hwy 191 to Mexican Hat then north on 261 to Goosenecks and Moki Dugway to Natural Bridges and on to Torrey (very long drive, so you could stop in Mexican Hat, Blanding or possibly Hanksville- which would put you in a better place for the next day anyway )

7- Goblin Valley and Little Wild Horse. Stay Torrey

8- Capitol Reef

9- Torrey to SLC

That gives you another day to play with.

Just an idea.

Uden, The...
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4. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Have you ever been to Mesa Verde NP? It's in the SW Corner of Colorado and not that much of a detour. You'll need most of the day to explore though. www.nps.gov/meve

Tet

San Francisco
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5. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Since you'll be in southern Utah, maybe you'd be interested in seeing more of the Navajo and Hopi areas. The Navajo Nation is in 3 states, but mainly northern Arizona. Monument Valley is one of its tribal parks.

Several U.S. national parks are within the NN boundaries, and some have special tours by Native guides with horses or jeeps. Some ancient Anasazi sites (cliff dwellings, paintings, etc.) can be seen only these tours. Canyon de Chelly is one such national park.

Window Rock is the Navajo capital, named for an arch formation. Not far from it is Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site in the town of Ganado. It still operates today as a trading post, where you can find local art and craft items. If you buy a weaving or a piece of silver jewelry at Hubbell, you can be assured it didn't come from a mass production plant in Mexico, but from the hands of local artisans. I visited Hubbell several times when one of my friends was with the NPS there, and I loved that place.

I don't know if it's the same now, but some of the best food in the area was at the hospital lunchroom at Sage Memorial Hospital in Ganado. Can't recall if the hominy and mutton stew I liked so much was there or at the hotel in WIndow Rock. :)

You can explore the Navajo Nation on good roads, which are patrolled by tribal police (Tony Hillerman's characters). Many residents are farmers or shepherds, and it's common to see people out and about with their flocks. The biggest town in the western part of the NN is Tuba City, named not for a nusical insrument but for a prominent 19th century chief. But you don't need to go that far; you'll get a good feel for the area in the east. Many of the residents in the east work in coal mining, which most Americans do no know is a major industry in the Four Corners region.

The Hopi live in an enclave surrounded by the Navajo, most of them on mesas, or high ground where they can see all around them. This is because they have a history of being a minority and feeling the need to protect themselves. Visitors can go to the mesas with a local guide. One memory I have is walking up the unpaved street to the top of a mesa that was probably inhabited when Columbus was a baby, and seeing a "Deli Dan" (delicatessen goods) van making a delivery. There are no stores for miles, but someone up there must have been planning a party.

Old Oraibi, a Hopi village, is believed to be among the oldest continually settled places in the U.S. There is a Hopi cultural center and museum at Second Mesa.

You do not need any special visa for the Navajo or Hopi nations, just your personal ID, driver's license, etc. Visitors are asked to observe a few courtesies, like no photography or drawing of people, their homes, animals, etc. without permission (some believe a picture captures a person's soul). If you are allowed to take pictures, it's customary to offer a small gift (a couple of dollars). Outsiders are not typically invited to tribal dances or religious rituals, but if so, are asked to remain on the fringe and be quiet observers, not try to participate, photograph, or record. The Hopi, as I mentioned being fewer, are more protective of their privacy. But if you go to the mesas, you'll find the people very hospitable.

The folks in the the Navajo and Hopi nations have a long tradition that they take pride in, and it's a wonderful opportunity to learn about them by actually going there.

San Francisco
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6. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

P.S. There are lodgings and other visitor services at Window Rock, Tuba City, Chinle, and Second Mesa.

Park City, UT
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7. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

I agree with others that Mesa Verde (Colorado) and Canyon de Chelly (Arizona) would be good additional sites. They would be more historic than scenic, as your previous trip seems to have been.

Are you interested in renting a boat on Lake Powell?

Or a boat trip?

Cedar City, UT
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8. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Yeah....a Lake Powell boat trip was suggested. Not that I don't love it all here, but a day on Lake Powell will be a memorable experience.

Prague, Czech...
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9. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Hello all,

In Mesa verde we was in our second vacation in 2007, it was beatiful place.

In hubel trading post we were in the same year, but it wasnt interesting for us. Old indian woman with older weaver's loom whos wants $20 per 1 photo is horrible.

Visinting indian villages sound good, thanks for your tip.:-) But its possible sleeping there in tents? Is there some campgrounds (its safety), or just only lodgings?

We havent much money, so We dont thinking about renting boat:-(

thank all for yours comments

Uden, The...
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10. Re: What you recommended, for second visit UTAH?

Native Americans don't live in tents. In that area they always lived in houses in any shape. I remember tent camping near Kayenta but forgot the place and in Holbrook there's the WigWam motel. Prices must have gone up at the Hubbell Trading Post (which we liked very much). We payed $ 1,-- first time we visited long ago.

We have been to the places you mentioned at least 3 times, sometimes more and it never bores. You easily can come back and see it all again. And if you never have been to Goblin Valley, Wild Horse Canyon, Gooseneck SP, Moki Dugway, Muley Point, Natural Bridge NM, Edge of the Cedars SP etc etc. go for it now.

Maybe also think of visiting the Colorado SW corner, San Juan Skyway, Durango, Ouray, Telluride, Black Canyon of the Gunnison NP, Colorado NM etc.

Tet