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How to speak in Hawaii???

Iowa
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How to speak in Hawaii???

I've been looking but haven't found this yet..... Does anyone know where I could get a booklet of phrases with the correct pronociation to take with . us to Hawaii. I speak English (of course) and some Spanish and a little French. Getting very excited!

washington
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1. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

Here's a little primer for you... http://hawaiian-words.com/basics/common/

Have fun!

Iowa
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2. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

thank you so much but is there somewhere that has the pronunciation in a printed version so I can take it with me?

washington
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3. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

There are books on Amazon about learning Hawaiian but you will not hear it spoken much beyond Aloha, Mahalo, pupu etc. in daily conversation.

Burr Ridge, Illinois
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4. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

I have visited Iowa many times over the years and I've never learned any Amish words. Meaning, that mamma is right. The only word that I often hear tossed into conversation with the locals, besides what mamma mentioned, is pau. Pau means finished or done.

"When you are pau we can meet for a drink."

On the other hand, I do find knowing a few Japanese words can make life fun and entertaining on the island. If you are only going to Maui then you will not run into as many Japanese speaking tourists as you would on Oahu. The Japanese do love it when you take time to say HI and welcome them. It always brings a smile to their face.

Iowa
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5. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

LOL OK let me explain more in detail what I want and why... I don't want the whole language just a few phrases/words. I find the Hawaiian pronc . very difficult to do on my own by the spelling :} I just like knowing a few words Just looking for a simple pamplet or something to take with me to share with the family as we have a few kids going with us this time :} Um no you are not going to hear much Amish in Iowa as most in Iowa live in the Amana Colonies and not accross the state. Although the Amana Colonies are really fun and educational to visit!

Santa Monica, CA
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6. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

Your kids will have a blast learning the names of the Hawaiian fish. Get a laminated card for that (you can bring it snorkeling with you). My kids studied that thing on the plane and my 5 year old was a big hit on our snorkel boat tour for properly pronouncing lauwiliwilinukunukuʻoiʻoi, a trigger fish.

www.hanaumabay-hawaii.com/Fishcards.htm

Otherwise, just speak normally and others will use words or phrases that you can parrot. Aloha, mahalo being the most common words you will encounter.

The guide book, Oahu Revealed, uses many common Hawaiian words (mauka for towards the mountain and makai for towards the water).

Watch the movie Lilo and Stitch for a few more common words.

Here's a website I just stumbled on while looking for how to spell the fish, above!

forvo.com/word/…

There is an audio function so you can hear the correct pronunciation.

Iowa
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7. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

thanks this is more what I was looking for. Anyone else have any ideas?

San Diego...
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8. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

While it is a fact that it is all English, there is a definite Hawaiian culture to be enjoyed and discovered.

here is a book on Amazon that might fit your needs;

Mickey Dodd's Hawaiian Language Pronunciation Guide and Mini-Dictionary

Learning to pronounce Hawaiian words like street names, condo complexes can be fun even if it is not spoken on your trip. Also a lot of places are named for historical Hawaiian figures and to know who they are can be fun as well. Hawaii has a rich and somewhat tragic history.

A great read on Hawaii history is the Shoal of Time: A history of the Hawaiian Islands

"Gavan Daws' remarkable achievement is to free Hawaiian history from the dust of antiquity. Based on years of work in the documentary sources, Shoal of Time emerges as the most readable of all Hawaiian histories.

Starting with the Western discovery of the islands in 1778--on through the days of the whalers, the missionary period, the plantation era with its vast numbers of Oriental immigrants, to the fall of the Hawaiian monarchy, annexation by the United States, and the long, slow move to statehood--the characters and events of Hawaii's past shine with new vitality and immediacy"

If you read this as I have several times, Hawaii comes to life right before your eyes

Sounds like to me you want to go a bit deeper than just the resort/restaurant experience abd be a little mre comfortable in your surroundings as well as educate your kids. Hope this helps

Iowa
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9. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

I love mamma's link to get the feel for pronunciation of all of the place names along with a few other common phrases. When I had no clue how to pronounce all of the place names I was quite confused and lost! So, wnatsunshine, I think you're right to want to learn how to pronounce the sounds.

Usually every letter will be voiced and in most cases it will have the same sound. And there are fewer sounds than many languages, so once you get the sounds down you're halfway there. The part that's still tricky for me is figuring out the accented syllable. So, listening will help you pick up some of that.

Nice book recs from John, thanks!

Oh, BTW, it's a common misconception, but the Amanas are not Amish. Some of the original Amana German families still live there. They are every bit as modern as the rest of us. The colonies do celebrate their communal past and welcome tourists, and many families still attend their simple church services. I believe the Kalona area is where some Amish and Mennonite families still live and farm. Love their organic eggs and produce!

Hope you have a fantastic first trip to Maui! Bet you will not miss the snow at Christmas at all!

Edited: 09 December 2013, 16:51
Nanaimo, Canada
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10. Re: How to speak in Hawaii???

Ono That is the one word I use a lot when eating on Maui. Good! Yummy! Delicious!