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rammadan

Southampton, United...
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rammadan

Hi Does this effect the souks etc, what difference would thi smake to a tourist especially those who may enjoy a little tipple. Thanks.

Marrakech, Morocco
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1. Re: rammadan

hi thomNewYork !

The ramadam is a special part of the year where all muslims are vey happy after the "ftour",it's to say the hour they start back eating and go with family&friends for having a drinck (without alccol) and are passing really good time!

Concerning the tourists,nothing change much excepted at the precise moment when everybody eat&drinck at the end of the day when the sun goes down..!

A part the "ftour which means breakfast,all can go in discos drinck(if not muslims)&go to the souks or what ever and live normally!

Just try to avoid to smoke when you're in the old part of the city(medina)when some people will be very nervous if they smell the cigarete when they've got to stop for the day!!

This special period is really great as everyone is very peacefull and that part of the year is very interesting for the fellow traveler!

Cheers!oliver.

Kathmandu, Nepal
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2. Re: rammadan

You may find that some restaurants that normally serve alcohol do not do so over Ramadan. This is the case in Rabat, but not sure about Marrakesh.

Southampton, United...
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3. Re: rammadan

Thanks for your help.

Spain
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4. Re: rammadan

The evenings are ok BUT the days are different , and this year , because it will be even hotter during Ramadam the locals will be more irritable.

I do wonder about Oliver DarNajat , if he lives in the same city < marrakech ??. The people are all so friendly , ??, during Ramadam ?/. Be honest , please .Many people are in a foul mood during the day , and argue , pushing , fighting etc , i see it with my own eyes , so do not say i dont know !!!.

They are thirsty ,. hungry , cannot smoke and not in a patient mood . I once bought a bottle of water from a kiosk on mohamed 5 and a passer by hurled abuse at me !!!. Get real !!.

Marrakech, Morocco
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5. Re: rammadan

Hi kimiloan!

Whaou!!!

As you may know..ramadam is a holy part of the year for muslims,it's to say,evey evenings ,they share great dinners together with much better food than usual with family&friends..and it supposed to be a part of the year where everybody is trying to respect evryone in the hightest way..!not to say anything bad regarding others..

You're pritty right for only the first days of ramadam and very last days which are the most difficult when you don't drink&smoke&eat..!but ,be sure first of all,all since they are very young are very used with it!and that's pritty usual again my friend!

Considering your bad experience,i can understand and that's true.. again it can be hard for the very few begining days as we did say!

For info,last year,the ramadam started the 10 th of september and if you're used with morocco,it was pritty hot too!

And very last point my friend..if this period was not in adequation with tourisms,would not work in any muslims country..!and they would avoid to have any tourists during this time which is not the case..!

Considering your fears if i live or not in Marrakech..i do live there and glad to be there with ramadam or not!

Cheers my friend!oliver.

Marrakech
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6. Re: rammadan

It is incorrect to say that many people are in a foul mood during the day. Yes, we all have days when the fasting is more of a struggle, but to give the impression that everyone is abusive all day long is incorrect. As DarNajat mentions the socialising amongst family and friends during ramadan is quite special. In my experience people make that extra a bit effort during this time.

Kimiloan - it's a shame that your only memory of ramadan is of someone shouting at you. I wonder were they shouting out you because they were thirsty, or did they think it was disrespectful of you to be drinking water in the street...

I don't intend to sound rude with my comments. I'm just suggesting another point of view to the situation.

Lunenburg, Canada
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for Saint John, Foz do Iguacu, Iguazu National Park
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7. Re: rammadan

Hi New York!

You'll find Ramadan the very best possible time to visit the Moslem world.

I sometimes see people who've written negative things about visiting during Ramadan, but this is utterly at odds with what I saw in Morocco during that time.

You'll find that Ramadan is a magical time in Moslem countries. It’s like Lent all day and Christmas all night, only carried through with a sincerity never seen in Europe or North America.

We tried to respect those who were keeping the fast, and only ate in discreet locations. We usually kept in our car provisions bought at the supermarket and held picnics in sheltered spots.

In mid-afternoon, the streets are thronged with people, including office workers taking the afternoons off if they can. The medina, the old city, is thronged with shoppers and people simply standing around counting down the hours. As sundown gets closer, the milling crowds grow thinner and thinner, as one-by-one people drift home to get ready for supper. In the last few minutes before the sun disappears, the streets are deserted.

Promptly at the moment of sundown, the air raid sirens sound. This is the signal for virtually every Moroccan to chow down. Passing people’s homes, you’ll see them at table breaking the fast.

One evening, we sauntered by a tavern. The host saw us and beckoned to come in. He gave us each bowls of the traditional harira soup, which I found myself developing a taste for. Then he refused to let us pay! For a Moroccan during Ramadan, seeing someone out on the street at supper time with no meal is like in Canada or the States finding a poor man with no Christmas dinner.

After supper, Moroccan towns come alive with nighttime activity. We saw street parades, happy people out and about, and everyone generally making merry.

Except on the resorts, liquor is difficult to come by in Ramadan, although not impossible. The bars are all open in the evening, but they’re dry! The Koran prohibits alcohol and, although lots of people cheat the rest of the year, most take it more seriously in Ramadan. You’ll find lots of night life, but fueled with 7-Up, Canada Dry and milk!

At a small village inn in a hamlet called El Ksiba, we settled down for a sumptuous evening meal (as a ridiculously low price!). One of us asked for wine. The host glanced furtively from side to side and offered to see what he could do. Almost twenty minutes later, he returned with what must have been the only bottle in town. No doubt in a bigger center with lots of tourists, booze would have been easier to come by, but our host was able to find it even in a mountain village.

Although we were always careful to be discreet about eating and drinking by day, remember that you are not required to observe the fast if you aren’t a Moslem. (Likewise, young children and people with medical conditions like diabetes are exempt.) If you look like a European, you’ll be assumed to be a non-Moslem tourist.

Not only can you legally eat, but people will ply you with hospitality. In carpet shops and private homes it happened repeatedly to us. The hosts offered us mint tea, sweets, and sometimes lunch, all the while watching enviously and a few openly salivating. It wasn’t our idea, and we never asked for the food and drink! It’s recognized that non-Moslems do not have to fast, and no one will think ill of a tourist for taking refreshments when offered.

Throughout the Moslem world, Ramadan is considered a season of peace, when even those who might be nasty at other times go out of their way to be nice for twenty-nine days. God ordered the fast, don’t forget, so that the high and mighty might humble themselves to find out what it’s like to be poor.

Our Moroccan trip during Ramadan was one of the happiest I ever took. Everybody was kind to us. Everybody, with special mention to the tavern keeper who gave free soup!

By the way, we traveled on our own in a rental car. We had no guide, no pre-planned itinerary, and no association with any other western tourists. Perhaps that’s why we enjoyed it so much. We got to see the real Moroccans, unfiltered by guides and resorts, and to us they were fabulous!

Happy travels, and let me know if I can help further!

David

capetien10@gmail.com

Marrakech, Morocco
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8. Re: rammadan

Hi heresmyreply!

thanks for piece of help and interesting and..real point of view!

cheers!oliver.

Spain
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9. Re: rammadan

I have to respond to "heresmyreply " comments.

I DID NOT drink water in the street , i bought a bottle of water in the street , two very different things! . I have been in Marrakech long enough to know what is respectful and what is not . But, i did have a quick swig of water when i was back inside ( the safety ) of my car , but a second person also abused me and banged on the window !!.

Also, this is not my " only memory " of Ramadam , i could tell you hundreds , but unfortunately they are not nice memories ! I am amazaed at other comments ( Capetien ) on the post about the incredible kindness of every body at at the time of Ramadam, maybe it is different out side Marrakech , but my experience here is, each year it gets more unpleasant , with the locals becoming more irritable and more expats choosing to leave the country for 4 weeks and come back when things are more normal ( whatever " normal " is in Marrakech !!,

Marrakech, Morocco
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10. Re: rammadan

Hi again!!

May i ask why are you coming every year at the same period of ramadam if this is coming more and more unplesant each year??

I would say for my own..again..all is a question of perception..you know my friend..question of half full bottle or half empty!you can always onmy remember bad points about any story or travels or..just remeber the good points and the best part of it and forget the small bad points!

cheers!oliver.

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