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Street food tours

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Melbourne, Australia
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Street food tours

Just wondering if there are such tours as street food tours enableing us to try the vast array of street food.An inside knowledge of the best spots and vendors would be helpful

Bangkok, Thailand
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1. Re: Street food tours

Where are you staying? Maybe we can point out something nearby.

Are you willing to travel a bit to find good, "local" food?

Melbourne, Australia
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2. Re: Street food tours

Staying at the Intercontintal and am willing to travel

Bangkok, Thailand
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3. Re: Street food tours

For one of the best renditions of khao mun kai - chicken rice - head up Ratchadamri, the main road heading north, between Gayson and Centralworld. Keep walking until you cross over the canal and hit Petchaburi road. Hang a right and walk to soi 30. Here you will find Kaiton - cheapeatsbangkok.com/html_eat/…kaiton.html

Take the sauce in the little bowl, and pour some over the dish, like this: cheapeatsbangkok.com/photos/…khaomunkai.jpg

An interesting destinatation, for anyone into food, is Aw Taw Kaw market (often spelled "Or Tor Kor). Here you will find many different fresh food vendors, plus good little food court.

I would definitely recommend some bamee from the great lady at stall 12/5. Her English is quite good for someone who rarely associates with foreigners.

cheapeatsbangkok.com/html_eat/cart/bami.html

cheapeatsbangkok.com/html_eat/…bits3_11.html

You can reach it by skytrain. Take the BTS to "Mo Chit". From there, you can either transfer to the MRT and go one stop to "Kamphaengphet", or walk. If you take the MRT, the Kamphaengphet exit is #3.

Hell, Norway
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4. Re: Street food tours

While Curt's suggestions are good, there is no real need to travel more than a street or two to find good street food, as almost every street has stall or hole-in-the-wall type food shop. Look for freshly cooked food, for a place busy at lunch time and evening with locals, and ignore those places busy with tourists, or with few customers. Then you're on track for some good food.

Bangkok, Thailand
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5. Re: Street food tours

If Kaiton doesn't qualify as just down the street, better call room service. I have to be a contender for the "Laziest SOB on Earth", but it's an easy walk for me.

I'm not suggesting Aw Taw Kaw simply for the "street" food. Many "food" people would enjoy a visit to a wet market. I could send them to Klong Toei, but that's a little too local for many! Aw Taw Kaw is very accommodating.

As far as " ... a place busy at lunch time and evening with locals ..." goes, I always shoot for specific suggestions. Even at any particular eatery, there are hits and misses.

A good example is the famous, often recommended, MBK food court. Although most of the stalls will out cook 90% of MBK's "Fifth Food Avenue", I wouldn't give 50 satang for at least half the offerings.

When I go to a restaurant for the first time, I always ask "What's good?" When the reply comes back "Everything!", I begin to worry. The server or cook should be able to fire off a suggestion, without hesitation.

We're always looking for new spots, choosing based on customer counts, the appearance of the food, as well as recommendation. Easily half of the spots are never visited again. Many of the rest, although OK, are nothing to write home about. Then there are a few that are exceptional.

I pointed out two of them.

Another problem with the old "busy cart at lunchtime" technique is that many of the vendors have little patience for "foreigners" holding up their business during lunch. They have a limited timeframe from which they need to earn their living.

Many times I have experienced the glare from the server, dish of rice in one hand, ladle in the other. One gets the feeling that if I don't make my selection quickly enough, I may be picking rice from my hair!

Fortunately, I usually know what I want. Ironically, my wife, Thai, often holds up the line!

singapore
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6. Re: Street food tours

If I am staying in Tango Vibrant, 11 Soi Wattanawong, Pratunam ??

Any local food selling on near my place??

I am looking for thai local food..really thai local..(cos some restaurants selling thai foods but they way they cater is mix)

Thanks,

Bangkok, Thailand
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7. Re: Street food tours

Kaiton is close to you also. It will give you a chance to compare Thai chicken rice with Singaporean varieties.

scotland
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8. Re: Street food tours

you have a very good seafood retaurant next door to the hotel, and further down the soi at the makkassan end you have good street food stalls that i use all the time

singapore
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9. Re: Street food tours

Thanks guys..

i am gearing up myself to try all kinds of street-food...

Mount Gambier...
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10. Re: Street food tours

While there are plenty of great tour guides in Bangkok I would recommend Tong (www.tourwithtong.com). Ask her to do a walking tour of Bangkok doing street foods! There are plenty of great little places to try around Chinatown/Grand Palace area... also Soi Rambuttri and Khao San Rd have lots of good street vendors (although they cater more for tourists with your usual Pad Thai / Papaya Salad / Pancakes).

I found wandering around Chinatown Grand Palace area I was able to find lots of 'different' food stalls.. but sometimes its nice to have a guide with you who can explain what everything is (esp. when vendor doesnt speak English) and advise what is clean/dirty!!

A walking tour with Tong (or one of her guides) only costs about 1000-1800 baht for a full day... that is per tour NOT per person so the more people you have the cheaper it is! You would then pay on top of that any food/admission etc...

Here is a cut/paste job from one of my travel blogs where we did a small food tour (wasnt doing it specifically to seek out food):

"Our last day in Bangkok was spent touring around the Grand Palace (yes my 3rd and last time...), Wat Po, Wat Arun, Chinatown and the Amulet Markets. We hired my friend Nok, who is a tour guide in Bangkok. She is the same Nok that we will be attending the wedding of in a couple of weeks in Surat Thani.

After a breakfast of Banana pancakes, Nok arrived and we set off. The tour we were doing was a walking tour (as well as just using local transport such as the local bus and tuktuks). We caught the ferry down to Chinatown where we wandered around checking out all the food stalls. We decided to try some of the local street foods. First up were these deep fried potato cakes, served chopped up in a plastic bag covered in sweet chilli sauce.. so good! We then tried some "Meang Kum" - these consisted of dry coconut, dry shrimp, onion, nuts, melted sugar and fresh lime pieces all wrapped up in green leaves served on a skewer. Nok told us that they were very hard to come by.. a popular streetfood that isnt made much these days. It was sooo yummy. The flavours went from sweet to sour and back again! Yum!

We then found some birds nest drink. It was a jelly like consistency and you drink it up. For those that don't know Birds Nest is actually birds spit collected from caves - it is meant to give you longevity of life! Interesting flavour but gross when you think about what you are actually drinking! birds spit! Ewwww! Final food stop was a famous little Dim Sum place in the middle of a Chinatown Alley, I was pretty full by this stage so just tried a couple of tiny prawn dim sum pieces.. very very good!

After wandering around Chinatown we then headed to Wat Po and Wat Arun... I have been to these places twice before. Still a good photo opportunity, but more for Milly's sake than mine!! Completely stuffed we went to a great local restaurant "Sugar Palm".. I went there on my first trip and it was great. For all 3 of us it was 480 baht incl 1 entree, 3 mains, rice and drinks (alcohol too). This is equivilent to about $19AUD.

With tummys full we headed to the Grand Palace. On the way we came across a street vendor selling homemade coconut icecream! We couldnt resist! It was probably THE BEST icecream I have ever eaten.. it was served in its shell and before he puts the icecream in, he scoops around the outside of the shell to loosen all the soft flesh and puts the coconut icecream on top.. so it was a mix of fresh coconut and coconut icecream.. it still makes me drool!

We toured the Grand Palace for about an hour and then we left, heading to the Amulet Markets. Amulets are small statues/pendants of buddha's, kings etc that are said to give you luck in different areas. I bought a protection amulet for work and a love amulet, hoping that area of my life might just improve one day soon! :-) I also got a protection amulet for my house and one for my son. You can get different ones for all areas of your life... money, success, health etc"

Also Floating Markets with Tong is a good way to try some street food too! Hope that helps!

Reet