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Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Yorkshire Dales...
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Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Can anyone recomend the best repellent we got badly bitten when we came 2 years ago in february. We are coming in september this year are sand flies a problem we are staying at club bentota.

Colchester
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1. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

You simply need a repellent with a high percentage of DEET. Boots have a good selection so buy here before you leave.

In Sri Lanka, if you have A/C, mossies should not be a problem and most hotels provide electric mats at night, if not you can buy them quite cheaply.

David.

Ahungalla, Sri Lanka
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for Sri Lanka, Kalutara, Ahungalla
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2. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Hi there...

Also consider AUTAN, as good as it gets, i use it all the time in Sri Lanka and don't get bitten.

Also, keep doors and windows in your room closed after sunset, epsecially during or after rain, that's when most mozzies are about !

Regards

Dave

Yorkshire
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3. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Jungle Formula Extra Strength range (50% DEET) for tropical use. Gives up to 10 hours protection. If you can find a cheaper make that stacks up to this, then use that (Boots also do a 50% one - don't know how long it lasts).

Burn mosquito coils if you're sitting around on a terrace/balcony, and get a knock-down spray for rooms too. True, that mossies don't care for aircon. much,

Edited: 03 June 2010, 22:17
england
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4. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

a product that is called mossie milk is excellent, its like a roll on and you do not need total coverage for it to work. You can only get it off the internet. My mum has huge problems when bitten and has found this really works, it says not to use on under threes but our daughter has always used it and now its part of the routine when she goes out in the garden or on holiday

Sheffield, United...
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5. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

I also swear by Boots as being one of the best. I do not get bit so much but my Wife they willeat alive. She uses thisas well as I and do not get bitten except in the day in the corridors.

Yorkshire Dales...
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6. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Thanks all for your advise.

St Austell
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7. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

I'm another fan of the Boots repellent with Deet, but the only one which I find totally effective is the LOTION, not the spray. The lotion is sticky and prevents any insect from landing on or biting you. I still get bitten if I use a spray, whether Boots, Autan or any of the others, which is a pity, as the lotion is a bit messy and unpleasant, but it works ....

Sue

Kent, United Kingdom
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8. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Hi,

Marks and spencers are doing a mozzie spray with 50% deet at the moment buy one get one free, also tescos doing there own one. I have purchased both, so we have plenty.

Hope that helps the above are more reasonable price than boots.

regards

carol

Sheffield, United...
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9. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Deet is Ok in small amounts and for shot term use. Only use when needed IE. Night time/ Dusk. I was warned by a US Marine. Read this below.>

AA study was done involving 143 National Park Service employees at Everglades National Park to determine the effects of DEET on varying use groups. Exposure groups were classified as low (non-users), medium (0.01-0.52 g/day) and high (0.71-69.38g/day) use of DEET. It was found that 36 of the workers (25%) reported health effects that they attributed to DEET. These effects included rashes, skin or mucous membrane irritation, transient numb or burning lips, dizziness, disorientation, and difficulty concentrating. Headache and nausea were also reported. A statistically significant difference was not found between reported effects from high-exposure and medium-exposure workers, although the incidences were significantly higher than in the non-users (McConnell et al. 1987).

A retrospective analysis of calls to poison control centers provided additional data of the effects of exposure to DEET in the general U.S. population. From 1985 to 1989, 71 poison control centers reported over 6 million human exposures to a variety of chemicals. Of these, 9,086 calls were related to DEET exposure. Of the DEET calls, 54% had no symptoms at all at the time of the call, and only 40% had symptoms that were thought to be related to DEET exposure. Symptoms were most likely to occur if the patient sprayed the repellent in the eyes, or inhaled the product. Symptoms were least likely to occur if the patient ingested small quantities of the repellent. Of all exposures, 88% did not require medical attention; 35% had minor side effects (skin irritation); 1% experienced moderate symptoms (including disorientation or brief seizures, all of which resolved without sequelae; and five had major effects (which were life-threatening or result in residual disability or disfigurement). One reported death was from deliberate ingestion of an 8-ounce bottle of DEET. No relationship was found between age, sex, or concentration of DEET and the severity of reported side effects. Children were not more likely to develop side effects from DEET exposure when compared to an adult population (Veltri et al. 1994).

A similar analysis published by Bell at al. (2002), analyzed an additional 20,764 reports to poison control centers from 1993-1997. Of all reported cases, 96% were determined to have no effect or a minor effect. Once again, the highest rate of side effects was from inadvertent ocular exposure (21% of all calls). Skin symptoms (irritation or rash) were reported in 10.5% of calls. Neurological symptoms were reported in 1.4% of all cases (including dizziness, headache, and drowsiness). Seizure was reported for 20 cases. Two deaths were reported in a 26 year-old male and a 34 year-old female following dermal exposure. No clear relationship was seen correlating seriousness of the side effects and concentration of DEET products used, and children were no more sensitive than adults.

St Austell
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10. Re: Best mosquito repellent advise please.

Bladesboy is right to mention the risks associated with Deet and its use should definitely be limited. However, if you were to mention the affects of diseases carried by malarial and dengue carrying mosquitoes to this, it would make even more terrifying reading.

Dawn and dusk are definitely the times to cover up and use your repellent. Even though the dengue carrying mosquitoes fly by day and the malarial ones by night, most mosquitoes of either type are about early and late in the day. With a few exceptions, I have not been troubled by mosquitoes in the heat of the day in most areas, nor at night when you are either protected by an air conditioned room, or have a mosquito net surrounding you to keep them away.

Sue