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Food Question

Southern Highlands...
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Food Question

I've been reading lots of post about restaurants in Istanbul and the amazing food. I loved the food when I was in Turkey and just thinking about it makes my mouth water.

In most countries there is something that is a werid traditional food that some people from other countries would go what the ....?

So I was wondering what is it for Turkey? What is the strangest things you can try in Istanbul?

Houston, Texas
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61. Re: Food Question

That would be horrifying. You clearly went to a more advanced school than I. In small town Indiana, we considered dissecting a nightcrawler a privelege followed weeks later by the lonely toad. Which brings up fried frogs legs?

A delicacy here,especially in the South. I've watched them being prepared. Of course they are impeccably cleaned, breaded with cracker crumbs and undeniably dead. However, the nature of the strong thigh muscle on a frog makes them twerk when thrown in hot oil.

A bit offputting at first, I do declare.

Kayakoy, Turkey
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62. Re: Food Question

Fried flour!!! Yes! What a good thing that it is mentioned here! I already forgot about it! I saw that for the first time in Ramada hotel in Antlaya just a few weeks ago where they served it for breakfast and I have to say it went very well with many people! I was going to remember the name but unfortunately I forgot. I was corn flour fried in butter. I did not try it as it did not look to appealing and I am not really in favor of fried breakfast items :-)

Kayakoy, Turkey
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63. Re: Food Question

One more... I think the combination of yogurt and fried eggs is pretty odd.!

Istanbul, Turkey
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64. Re: Food Question

VR- that yoghurt and egg thing must be çılbır. I find it very odd too.

Sharon-LOL. I do not think I can try your recipe. Would you accept my "no,thank you"?

Istanbul
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65. Re: Food Question

I go to a Van breakfast place in Taksim, and the two weird things for me that come along with the platter are egg/flour mix. I wonder if that's the fried flour people are writing about. I ate it in Van too. It's mostly flour and seems very fattening but probably just what you need if it's -15C and you have a large family and need to fill them up on something cheap. The other thing is something which reminds me of little stones, or grit from the pavement. The next time I go I'll ask for the names of these things.

Ruhr Area, Germany
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66. Re: Food Question

Knuckle of porc in spicy and sour aspic is a very popular speciality in my country, perhaps similar to Sharon`s pickled pigs feet. It´s not bad but I can only eat it when it is prepared without the rind, just pure meat.

nkt
Ankara, Turkey
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67. Re: Food Question

A marketing strategy of evil CocaCola is that they don't let a fast food place sell brands not owned by their agglomeration if the place wants to buy the drinks in bulk prices. This makes local brands harder to get at many eateries. But Uludağ can be found in any supermarket, and about half of small neighborhood groceries. And BR, they do have a diet Uludağ, but its taste has an extra tint of artificialness.

Yes kachika, I first encountered the "fried flour" dish in Van as well. I guess it has an actual name but I don't know it.

Çılbır (pronounced like Ch'lb'r) is actually not fried eggs. It is poached (is this the correct word for "broken into boiling water") eggs in salty vinegary water, and immersed in garlic yoghurt, topped with spicy molten butter. I used to make great çılbır in Boston, come to think of it, I haven't made it since I came to Ankara...almost 7 years without çılbır o.O

I must fix that! Perhaps I'll prepare çılbır and serve in heart-shaped plates tomorrow.

My favorite pickle is green beans. But nothing beats pickled lettuce if the purpose is putting it in a sandwich (due to shape).

Frog legs used to have a tiny place in Turkey, but somehow they disappeared in the 80s. They are still collected in some places (around Adana I presume) to be exported. I think they taste quite good, and are very cute, like mini chicken legs.

And for the dessert, pishmaniye ! Think compressed cotton candy, but with better taste. It is usually packaged like little lumps of fiberglass. It is something you have to try.

I should stop posting in this thread, or soon some people will start to think of me as a cross between a garbage disposal unit and the cookie monster :)

Istanbul, Turkey
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68. Re: Food Question

nkt- çılbır in a heart-shaped plate = yucky romance :)

Happy Valentine's Day to all the couples (it is officially Feb 14)

Houston, Texas
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69. Re: Food Question

nkt - LOL - I have never heard anyone refer to frog legs as "cute". I suppose that compared to a dried up old sheep's head with tiny little rice-like teeth, or trotters, you may have a point. They are good. They taste like chicken! And when I think pishmaniye, cotton candy was also my first thought. My second was the unfortunate consequences of eating a cotton candy at the County Fair prior to the tilt-a-whirl ride.

Patara - they say "you are what you eat". I must just be rind-ier than you as this is no problem for me, especially if they are fried crispy, like the frogs legs!

And Borus, so Valentine's Day is celebrated in Turkey? Worldwide?

Edited: 14 February 2014, 00:43
nkt
Ankara, Turkey
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70. Re: Food Question

Culturally, Turkey is being assimilated into Hollywood, just like the rest of the planet. So we celebrate whatever we see Americans celebrate on TV, including StValentine's and Christmas (but we do the latter on New Year's eve). We don't celebrate Thanksgiving, but we merged that one into New Year and Xmas as well - we bake whole stuffed Turkey for a big family dinner on NYE. Halloween isn't a thing yet, but I noticed some youngsters organizing costume parties in the recent few years. Easter and country-specific holidays (independence day, Martin Luther King day, etc.) aren't adopted of course. We have a labor day, but it is May1st.