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The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

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Istanbul, Turkey
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The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Hi forum,

Here is my list of things which are known as Turkish but in reality they are not authentcally Turkish:

- Belly Dancing (Arab)

-1001 Nights (Iran)

-Backgammon (Iran)

-Kokoreç (Greek)

-Simit (Israel)

-Kebab (Arab)

-Baklava (Arab)

-Halloumi cheese (Cyprus)

-Lahmacun (Arab)

-Künefe (Arab)

-Camels (Arab)

You can add yours into this.

Borus

Istanbul, Turkey
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1. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

A friend of mine has corrected me that simit is very Turkish. sorry for that! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simit

London, United...
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2. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Haha Borus - at least "Turkish Delight" (lokum) does seem to be Turkish!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_delight

Istanbul, Turkey
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3. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Yes Attagül, that's so relieving to know that. Turkish hamam and Turkish coffee are also authentically Turkish.

Edited: 20 February 2014, 09:54
Istanbul
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4. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Apple tea!

Falafel and hummus.

Women in black burkhas.

If you watched Taken 2 you would think the last thing was especially Turkish but it isn't.

Kayakoy, Turkey
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5. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

My husband.... from Albanian - Syrian backgrounds :-)

Istanbul, Turkey
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6. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Kachika- I will reveal a very dark secret about us (the Turks): We do not drink apple tea at home and it is something offered only to tourists. Funny, isn't it?

Istanbul
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7. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Yeah, the first time I came to Turkey people kept giving my sister and I apple tea, so obviously we thought it was something Turkish. It was only after I moved here I realised that nobody drinks it and it's created for tourists. Perhaps the Turkish tea is a bit too strong for many foreign tastes.

Istanbul, Turkey
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8. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

LOL VR- Who else not? Take me for example, mixture of Balkan and Kayseri. A blonde man with blue eyes and he is originally from Kayseri. Hilarious!

Istanbul
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9. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

Baklava is Ottoman Turkish according to the respected Wikipedia. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baklava". It seems to have developed in the kitchens of Topkapi Palace and the word has Turkic-Mongolian origins. Here I quote: "Although the history of baklava is not well documented, there is evidence that its current form was developed in the imperial kitchens of the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul based on a Central Asian Turkic tradition of layered breads.".

Simit is definitely Turkish.

Künefe's origin is Levantine, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanafeh", and the Turkish version is subtantially different than the Lebanese version. I have eaten both. I prefer the wonderful Künefe I have eaten at Antakya. If you ever go to Antakya, enjoy their absolutely delicious Künefe at the Anadolu Restaurant: "tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g312729-d193…".

Are tulips Dutch or Turkish? Although they originally got the seeds from Turks and developed their own tulip fields and are much more tulips than Turkey. "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulips".

enigma...

Trondheim
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10. Re: The things known as Turkish but that are not really Turkish

In Gaziantep I learnt that the city is the home town for Baklava. I think that is correct.