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How Hot is Hot?

Long Beach, New York
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How Hot is Hot?

I am heading for Israel for the first time after 74 years. My wife is 70 and has relatives in Israel who emigrated when she was forced out of Egypt when Nasser took control. I have been asking various questions on this forum and am most appreciative of all the wonderful replies i have received.

My wife keeps talking about the heat although she hasn't been back to Israel in three decades. She keeps saying we will swelter from August 22 - September 7. (This is the only time I was able to get away.)

Our itinerary includes spending the first week in Tel Aviv at a hotel still to be determined but probably facing the sea and another week in Jerusalem, finishing up in Tiberias with a cousin.

The question boils (sic) down to how hot is hot. We live in in New York City where the summer months can get brutal at times. Aside from the desert, will we be experiencing blistering heat in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem during this period where we can hardly do anything?

Thousand Oaks...
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for Israel
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1. Re: How Hot is Hot?

It's all relative as to how one deals with the heat and how they cope with it. I personally like Eilat in the summer where it can get to 110 F in the shade and find the 80 degrees + humidity in Tel Aviv no problem.

For the most part expect coastal temps to be in the 80's with humidity, although not as humid as NYC. Evenings are beautiful and mild. Tiberias can be somewhat warmer, perhaps into the 90's with pretty much the same anount of humidity as the coast. Jerusalem will be in the 80's or so with less humidity and cooler evenings. The elevation is higher there. If you venture to Egypt or the Negev region, expect temperatures to be 100 or higher in the shade.

Hope this helps

Dr. Z

References: personal experiences, WeatherUndergound, Intellicast

Florida
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2. Re: How Hot is Hot?

Check this website for more information:

ims.gov.il/IMSENG/All_Tahazit/homepage.htm

Hope it helps, it did for us.

israel
Destination Expert
for Mitspe Ramon
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3. Re: How Hot is Hot?

Dr Z. The Negev is a VAST region accounting for about 60% of Israel and has huge differences in climate from place to place and deserves more attention regarding climate. Elevation ranges from 400 meters below sea level to 1000+ meters above sea level and temperaures vary accordingly. In Mtzpe Ramon, 850 meters above sea level) for example the climate is comparable to that of Jerusalem.

Humidity to varies alot ranging from very high to immesaurable low depending on the area and it's proximity to the sea.

So giving one weather forecast for the whole Negev is missleading and very innacurate. In Summer A 35 mile drive from Beer Sheva to Sde Boker will see temperatures drop by 3-5 degrees celcius and humudty drop by 15-20%. A futher 20 mile drive to Mtzpe Ramon will see temperatures drop by another 3-5 dgrees celcius and humidty will cease to exist. A one hour drive from Beer Sheva to the Dead Sea will see cause the temperature to rize by about 10 degrees celcius.

The temperature in Beer Sheva is about 3-5 dgrees celcius hotter than that in Tel Aviv but the humidity is less than half of that in Tel Aviv so the heat is far far more bearable in Beer Sheva than in Tel Aviv.

Just for example only yesterday evening we went to see the sun set on a hill near Sde Boker and had to wear heavy fleece jackets to ward off the cold - far far cooler than Tel Aviv or Haifa and yet in the heart of the Negev.

The link to the site given by gkraus1 above is excellent and relatively accurate although that to does not do the Negev the full justice it deserves.

Adam

NYC/Israel
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for Israel
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4. Re: How Hot is Hot?

Thirty years ago A/C was not common in israel. Today it is just as common in Israel ( save for some private homes) as it is in the US. Buses, stores, most homes, restaurants, museums, taxis, private vehicles etc. etc. are all air conditioned. Things like ice-cubes--also hard to find are no big deal. Fact is the Israel of 30 years ago doesn't exist. While it may be hot--it is no harder to deal with than the heat of nYC or Florida!

Israel
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for Israel
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5. Re: How Hot is Hot?

Temperatures can reach 100 in August throughout the country but with lower humidity it is usually bearable. When looking at web sites, take into consideration that the averages are for the past 10 years. Israel has been in a drought for 6 years, that along with global warming has, for the past few years raised the temperatures year round. That being said, public buildings and hotels have airconditioners as do most private homes (perhaps not in the poorer neighborhoods).

When you come the important thing is to drink alot (at least 3 liters per day of non-diarretics), wear good sunscreen and a hat at all times you are outdoors. It is much more bearable than NYC in the summer, epecially in Jerusalem and Tiberias.

Regarding fishing in Tiberias, it is illegal, so you will have to think of something else to do in the north. Due to the lowered quantity of water and lowered quantity of fish, licenses are no longer obtainable.

Chana

Israel

Israel
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6. Re: How Hot is Hot?

The weather in Tel Aviv in the summer is hot and humid. Coming from NYC you know how unpleasant that can be. But the problem with being a tourist in a foreign country is that you tend to spend more time outside than in your own home town. Would you walk the streets of NYC when it is 100 degrees and 80% humidity? You probably prefer to stay in you air conditioned home. But when it gets 90 in Tel Aviv (very very very seldom higher than that) with "only" 70% humidity - You will find it quite unpleasant to walk in the streets. I consider that hot and unpleasant. I am 68, a bit younger than your wife and I try to stay in airconditioned enviroments when it gets that hot and humid..

Jerusalem is hot and dryer during the day time, and cool in the evening (light jacket can be helpful).

Tiberias is hot!!! it can reach 104-105. The Dead Sea and Eilat even hotter.

Tel-Aviv
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for Tel Aviv
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7. Re: How Hot is Hot?

Perhaps it would be better not to stay in Tiberius itself, but rather somewhere in the Galilee above Tiberius where it will be much cooler.

Israel
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8. Re: How Hot is Hot?

You took the words out of my mouth! Who wants to stay in Tiberias in the summer?

Cincinnati, Ohio
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for Israel
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9. Re: How Hot is Hot?

Erirya makes an excellent point -- there is a world of difference between living and working in a hot, humid city in the summertime and touring in one. I seldom go out in my city during the day in the summer, unless I am at a pool. It's very hot and humid here most summers. I surely would not want to tour in it.

That said, if that is the only time you can go, there you have it. But yes, stay somewhere other than Tiberias. And pay attention to Adam's explanation of variations in the Negev, avoiding areas that will make you feel like you have gone to visit the inside of a sauna.

Douglas Duckett

Jerusalem, Israel
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for Jerusalem
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10. Re: How Hot is Hot?

I visited New York, Washington DC and Florida in August a few years ago with my kids, and found the weather in New York to be similar to Tel Aviv, although NY was actually a lot wetter. Washington was really dry and hot, and felt very much like Eilat in the summer. Florida was much worse, humidity wise than any part of Israel that I have been in the summer.

Erirya is absolutely right about the difference between living and touring. We live in Jerusalem, and last summer decided to take a 3 day "mini-vacation" in Jerusalem itself, as we never get to sightsee in our home town. My plan was to visit 3 or 4 places each day, but we only got to see 2 each day, and all the kids wanted to do by 4pm was drive home, collapse in front of the TV with ice-cream and the air conditioning on!!

So, it's hard work being a tourist, but you will be fine if you pace yourselves, don't take on too much each day, drink a lot, and stop when you've had enough.