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Temple Mount

Richmond, Michigan
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923 posts
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Temple Mount

My wife and I both wear a cross around our neck that is very visible. When visiting the Temple Mount will we get harassed at all about this?

New York City, New...
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1. Re: Temple Mount

I would tuck it in out of respect.

Israel
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for Israel
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2. Re: Temple Mount

Sadly, it will be a good idea for you to tuck it into your shirt so that you don't run into any difficulties.

Richmond, Michigan
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3. Re: Temple Mount

Thanks for the advice, is it the same with the Western Wall, Should the crosses be tucked away?

Ottawa, Canada
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for Jerusalem, Galilee, Tel Aviv
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4. Re: Temple Mount

On the Temple Mount your cross should not be visible, security will ask you to remove it if they see it (not just tuck it in). Also you can not carry bibles or other religious objects up on the Mount. It is not the same at the Western Wall where everyone is welcome to come and to pray, including the pope. However, the Western Wall is a synagogue. Ostentatious jewelry to make a statement, (you say it is very visible) might be taken the wrong way by individuals and you should be sensitive to that- so it might be easier just to tuck it in.

Richmond, Michigan
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5. Re: Temple Mount

Again, thanks for the advice. Is okay to take pictures while visiting the Temple Mount an the Western Wall? Would it be okay to have my wife take pictures of me, vise versa.

Cincinnati, Ohio
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6. Re: Temple Mount

It is all right, but NOT on Shabbat. And I would try to be quick and discreet about it, and not catch others (particularly ultra-Orthodox worshipers) in the photos. It is a place of prayer; think about how you would feel if people took pictures of you at your church in worship.

You can do it -- but do it quickly, discreetly, and respectfully of others around you. But never on the Sabbath (Friday sundown to Saturday sundown).

Douglas Duckett

Israel
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7. Re: Temple Mount

Photography is permitted at the Western Wall except on Shabbat (the Sabbath) - Friday about an hour before sunset until after dark on Saturday - and Jewish religious holidays. The Wall has separate sections for men and women, so you will not be able to stand there together or take photos of each other close to the wall.

Edited to agree with Douglas about being discreet.

Edited: 12 August 2013, 21:23
Israel
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8. Re: Temple Mount

You can, however, pose together for a picture in the plaza outside the prayer area of the wall.

There is no problem with taking pictures on the Temple Mount.

Richmond, Michigan
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9. Re: Temple Mount

Thanks anmejoshme for making me realize it is a synagogue,a really big one in it's glory days. And labbat, your right, wouldn't appreciate people standing in the isle at church snapping pics of me on my knees praying. That's why I'm asking questions here well in advance of our trip, I realize were not going to be in Kansas any more, as Dorthy said.

Washington State
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10. Re: Temple Mount

I always get a little flack when I write on this topic.

I also suggest that you use discretion when taking photos at the Western Wall. But, that said, while it is a synagogue, it is not your normal, private synagogue. It is in the open air, in a very public, historical place and was certainly not a synagogue until recently. Most of the visitors there have cameras and it is one of the most photographed places in Israel and the world. Often film crews are there.

If you really don’t want your picture taken, this is a not a place to go (Jew or Gentile). People here have “no expectation of privacy”. Snap away; everyone else does.

BTW, I think the photos of Jews praying at this retaining wall are one of the most important and iconic images of Jews in Jerusalem that the world sees and if I was Jewish, I would hope everyone would see pictures of Jews peacefully and devotedly praying here.