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Mosquito repellent

Woking, United...
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128 posts
105 reviews
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Mosquito repellent

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone could recommend a good mosquito repellent for use in Kenya? We would like something pretty strong, and my girlfriend in particular would like an odourless version if that is at all possible!

Thanks,

daftpunk

Woking, United...
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128 posts
105 reviews
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1. Re: Mosquito repellent

Any other tips to keep the mozzies off us would also be appreciated.

Thanks,

Presteigne, United...
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55 posts
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2. Re: Mosquito repellent

Hello,

We're off on safari in a few weeks and we bought Boots own brand mosquito repellent. It's the extra strong version containing deet (name escapes me) and it's all 3 for 2 on offer at the moment which meant we picked up an extra bottle. They had a chart on the shelf which enabled you to check whether it was suitable for the travel zones you'll be visiting and this brand was good for all of Kenya apart from what looked like Lake Victoria in the far west.

Tips: Try to wear neutral shades of clothing so colours do not attract the mosquitos. Also the Avon Skin So Soft range was listed in Lonely Planet guide as an effective repellent. Apparently it stops you tasting so good!

Milton Keynes UK
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114 posts
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3. Re: Mosquito repellent

Get the hightest percentage of Deet content you can get, camping shop may have 80-100%, Boots is only 50%. I used Boots in Borneo and the little blighters attacked my bum like it was the buffet. Mind you, I'd sprayed mainly round my ankles, didn't expect the little blighters to attack from the rear so to speak! (I had trousers on at the time too.)

Tea tree oil is quite good after they've had a nibble, for the first day or two of application it doesn't seem so, then you'll suddenly realise they no longer itch. Most other 'bite' stuff doesn't seem to work and you'll be scratching for a week.

In general your girlfriend may have to choose between smelling nice or scratching. No mozzy repellent smells nice that I know of.

Aloe Vera gel is good for sunburn and prickly heat. Plain yoghurt is also good - you don't eat it you smear it on affected areas for half an hour. Personally, I prefer the Aloe Vera (sold in Holland & Barrett for a couple of pounds).

stoke on trent
10 posts
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4. Re: Mosquito repellent

hi daftpunk i always use bens family from lloyds chemist 6.00 pounds per tube but it works

Woking, United...
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128 posts
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5. Re: Mosquito repellent

Thanks all for your replies - any more hints suggestions would be welcome.

Cheers,

DAK
London
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23 posts
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6. Re: Mosquito repellent

I think we will opt for this 95% deet product from Millets:

millets.co.uk/Millets.storefront/…09035599

Anyone got any idea how many 50ml bottles to take?

Presteigne, United...
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55 posts
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7. Re: Mosquito repellent

I used the the 95% one from Millets when I went to Egypt and it is strong stuff and rotted my flip flops when the bottle leaked. Also, since it's so small and liquid based I skimped on applying it on my face and neck which was where I got bitten the most. It's not a product to smear on liberally too often. I've read that all deet does is to lengthen the time the repellent works, so the higher the concentration the less often you need to apply. In the case of 95% deet it lasts 8 hours or so. However, if you buy a cheaper version of 50% deet (which is also more kind on the skin) you just need to apply it every four hours instead. Dawn and dusk are the only really active mosquito times and you'll probably be covered in sun protection for the rest of the day. Overall I found it all works out the same with deet concentration. Sorry to bore you!

London, United...
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460 posts
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8. Re: Mosquito repellent

Midges and mosquitos may be annoying, but in malarial areas they are also dangerous. Malaria is endemic in more than 100 countries, each year around 2000 travellers return from overseas with Malaria.

The first thing you should do is HAVING CONSULTED WITH YOUR GP, get the Yellow Fever injection, then get prescribed with a course of anti-malarials, these are the main things you need for the prevention of malaria. However, the best prevention is to avoid getting bitten in the first place so DEET products are the best (Non-DEET based products just aren't worth thinking about for use in Africa). For those going on Safari it would be best to consider using a 100% DEET product (particularly around Lake Victoria) during the peak "biting times" of the day, these being at dawn and dusk, if you then want to continue using DEET throughout the day drop to a 50% formula. 100% DEET should not be used long term i.e. multiple applications every day. DEET is an aggressive product and loves plastic and man made fibres so it will eat through your plastic shoes and ruin anything that has man made fibres so don't wear your best clothes when using this product. Another good tip for ladies is don't wear perfume or use perfumed products such as fragranced deodrant, hairspray, body spray etc you will be like a magnet to the mossies, they will not be able to resist!. Forget about the cost and the inconvenience of what you can and can't wear because of DEET think about your health, wellbeing and happiness whilst enjoying you holiday and not having to worry about troublesome bites.

A good web site for DEET products is www.travelwithcare.com here you will find The Repel Range which ranges from 20% DEET to 100% DEET, plus a whole host of other useful travel products including self supporting mosquito nets for over the bed or camp bed. Many of their products have been trialled and tested by:

The Sunday Telegraph - Best tested products top 5* awards

The Sunday Telegraph - Best tested products

The Sunday Times - Good gear guide

and other assorted travel magazines.

It's worth a look but don't get too carried away remember those luggage restrictions - especially whilst on Safari!

London, United...
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460 posts
10 reviews
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9. Re: Mosquito repellent

You also might like to check out this gadget (no idea if it works)

The Moziban device (www.thejetrest.com/MozibanGoogle.asp)

Moziban emits a harmless ultrasound, proven to repel the female mosquitoes up to

a range of 2 metres from the device.

Only the female mosquitoes bite during their breeding period. The sound emitted by this device effectively repels the mosquitoes so avoiding their bites.

Simply clip on to a belt, handbag or children's carry-cot when out and about or keep on your bedside table for a peaceful, trouble free nights sleep. No need for sprays, creams, tablets or fly swats!

Uses 1 AA Alkaline battery which lasts for up to 6 months continuous use (not supplied).

Harmless to humans and pets.

Safe & kind to the environment.

Pocket sized with belt clip.

Ideal for alfresco dining, walking, fishing, camping, climbing, sleeping children.

Use both indoor and outdoor, particularly after dark.

The battery should last between 3 and 6 months of continuous use depending on battery type.

London, United...
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460 posts
10 reviews
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10. Re: Mosquito repellent

Just to make things clear as having just re-read my first post I don't want to mis-lead people. Mozzie sprays and creams like DEET products for example are NOT the best prevention for Malaria.

The only protection from Malaria is through the Yellow Fever jab and the anti-malaria tablets prescribed by your GP.

The anti-biting stuff is meant to do just that prevent you from being bitten they do not provide protection against the Malaria disease itself.

Just wanted to make that point.