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Speaking Chilean

Santiago, Chile
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Speaking Chilean

Chilean spanish has a lot of words particular to Chile. Berlitz has never heard of them. If you are coming here, you might want to look at an informative and amusing webpage:

geocities.com/TheTropics/…index.htm

There are also translations of various foods which could be very useful.

Calhoun, Georgia
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1. Re: Speaking Chilean

Thanks, now I have some more studying to do! ☺

Here's a phrase I learned in Chile: Arriba de la bola, literally on top of the ball. Drunk, meaning as unsteady of somebody trying to balance himself on top of a ball. Is this Chilean or a common Spanish phrase? Either way, it is funny.

It is also the name of a salsa club in Santiago.

Portland, Oregon
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2. Re: Speaking Chilean

Thank you, DM! I learned a new food word just reading a post below--palta. Is the word for avacado in Argentina also palta or aquacate?

Calhoun, Georgia
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3. Re: Speaking Chilean

DM

I have a question too. Why do some of the restaurants have Donde in the name? For example Donde la Cuca and Donde Agosto. You are now La Maestra Chilena.

Santiago, Chile
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4. Re: Speaking Chilean

Donde La Dancingmolly = DM's Place or Chez DM. Just a way of saying my place.

When I first got here I had spoken spanish for 27 years. Suprise! I didn't understand half of what people were saying to me.

Calhoun, Georgia
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5. Re: Speaking Chilean

DM

Did you see DTs question about avocado? She had asked before me.

I found too that I could not understand the "street" Spanish. When our guide got on the phone I would catch a word here or there but it was as though he was speaking with marbles in his mouth.

It is amusing that when he would be done he would say "Ya chou" and abruptly hangup, seemingly in the middle of the converstation. Also in the south part of Chile the people say ya instead of si for yes. I suppose that is the German influence.

Santiago, Chile
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6. Re: Speaking Chilean

Palta is palta in Argentina.

Ah, Chilean pronunciation and vocabulary. My own theory is that Chile was colonized by people from various non-spanish speaking countries plus some spaniards. There was never the huge Spanish influence of Perú, for instance. So some words were passed on incorrectly. Who knew? Add a bit of mapundungun (the Mapuche language) and you had a right old mix.

Your guide was saying good-bye: Ya, ciao (or chao). He just wasn't enunciating.

Calhoun, Georgia
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7. Re: Speaking Chilean

Thanks for your theory. It certainly makes me feel better because I have no trouble understanding Mexicans, which are the majority where I live. We have friends that are Cuban and Puerto Rican too. When I got used to the letters they drop I can understand them too. But as you point out, those countries had ties to Spain while Chile was left much on its own since Spain was looking for gold and didn't find any there.

Calhoun, Georgia
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8. Re: Speaking Chilean

Here is a Mexican expression my husband loves to use when he is talking with Mexican men. We often eat in the little taquerías in our town where the clientele are Hispanic.

“Solo mis chicharrones truenan.” Literally, “Only my pork rinds thunder” (crunch as loud as thunder) It means, I’m the boss or what I say goes. When he says that to the guys they laugh and are delighted that a gringo knows that expression.

I’ve tried to find out the origin of the saying but haven’t found anything. When I’ve done a search I find that it is even used in Mexican news articles usually referring to politicians.

As I was doing some searching a few minutes ago I found a forum for discussing Spanish and English grammar and vocabulary. I looks very interesting. forum.wordreference.com/forumdisplay.php…

Calhoun, Georgia
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9. Re: Speaking Chilean

Another bump. I need to go to the website and do some homework.

NEW YORK
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10. Re: Speaking Chilean

The use of "ya" is more simple than that. It just means OK. Literally.

So, they are sayon, OK Bye...Ya, Chao