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TEFL/Teaching English

London, England...
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30 posts
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TEFL/Teaching English

Anyone got any information on TEFL posts in North Korea?

They definitely do exist, and apparently the British Council offered them?

As it is, I can't find any info so if anyone has done this/knows any more, it'd be greatly appreciated :)

Tel Aviv, Israel
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1. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

Hi Josh this seems very unlikely. NK imposes huge restriction on foreign visitors. For instance you cannot go there unless u are on a guided organized tour and i do mean guided in every sense of the word. You are not allowed to go anywhere on your own and you are not even allowed to leave the hotel on your own. They will take your passport when you arrive and your cell phone which was absurd as there is no reception there anyway. There was a young guy on our tour from London who had a fancy to study in NK and when he asked the guide about it she thought he was mad. As for a practicle answer can the BC not give you an answer. If not I would suggest you contact Koryo tours who are the largest agency booking tours to NK and ask them if they have heard of such an option. I would assume if it exists you will be only allowed to stay in a closed compound next to any school. You will not be allowed to go around on your own or mix socially with the NK's. If the telf option doesnt exist then do go on a tour. Its a once in a lifetime experience. NK is one big totalitarain theme park. If you go there you will understand exactly how it is and my answer will make perfect sense.

good luck and would love to know if the options exisits

angie

www.angietravels.com

Edited: 30 November 2012, 11:55
London, England...
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30 posts
12 reviews
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2. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

Yes, I know all about the restrictions etc, hence why I was surprised to hear it was an option. It does genuinely seem to exist, though limited and apparently not very competitive. Seems to be the teaching of teachers etc.

Apparently if you get it you can move in relative freedom around Pyongyang and are put up in the diplomatic quarter of the capital.

Tel Aviv, Israel
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1,681 posts
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3. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

If you can find a way to do it then do it - it will be the experience of a lifetime.. still very wary they would let you move around freely. They were always concerned about what you could see or couldnt see. Teaching of teachers might be an option. I remember looking at a documentary on the internet about an aid worker that was allowed to travel to see some of the poverty but he was always with a minder and there were always restrictions to what he was shown. I can sort of picture the scenario that whoever you are teaching is going to be accompanied with some sort of minder to make sure you arent spreading any western ideaology. I am intrigued to know if you succeed.

Mackay, Australia
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4. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

Around 2004 I was offered a job teaching english in North Korea. I was offered this job by a recruiter in Brisbane Australia and was told the money was not great but it might be an experience. I opted for teaching in South Korea on 30k a year had the contract all signed but the South Korean embassy in Sydney knocked me back because my passport was water damaged so I never got to go to even South Korea. I had taught english in Russia. I don't think it would be hard to get a job in North Korea at all. If you really are interested just go to any North Korean diplomatic mission and talk to them. If you do go to North Korea to teach english and you start to open your trap about anything you have learnt from western media then you could be in big trouble and your embassy is not going to come to your aid. Entering north korea with authorization is also stupid. The plus side is you get to live in a real Communist Country that is pretty close to what Stalins Soviet Russia was like in 1930s. I think people are people regards of where they are but the is a real difference in governments.

Korea
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5. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

This is very a attractive and wonderful suggestion for me. I like this topic.

Korea
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6. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

This is very a attractive and wonderful suggestion for me. I like this topic.

http://www.mytefljobs.com/

Beijing, China
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118 posts
24 reviews
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7. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

Hi,

I was looking into teaching in North Korea a while back. As far as I am aware (from looking at the British Council job description of EFL teacher in DPRK) you need to be pretty qualified, meaning that you need either a DELTA qualification or a Masters in Linguistics. Unfortunately, a good old CELTA at the time wasn't good enough for the position, which put me off as I don't think I have the time or patience to do a DELTA (they are apparently very difficult with a high failure rate).

This was about 3 years ago so things might have changed.

Good luck.

Stuart

www.taedongtravel.com

Brisbane, Australia
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1 post
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8. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

Wow really? I am teaching Brisbane and I am quite interested in teaching in the DPRK!

Do you know the organisation that offered this job? :-)

Munich, Germany
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9. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

There are some foreign teachers in North Korea. I don't know how to become one, but I think you should check out this Reddit thread: reddit.com/r/…

It's by a computer scientist who spent some time teaching students in North Korea about computer sciences. He gives many technical details about their computers, but he also talks about interaction with the students and about how the international community lives. As far as I understood it, they all live in a compound, and whenever they want to leave it, they have to take a guide with them.

Harrogate, United...
3 posts
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10. Re: TEFL/Teaching English

I don't have a degree not because I'm stupid but I'm over 60 and went down the secretarial route. All the teaching jobs I've seen advertised ask for a degree. Frankly, if I were 30 something with a degree I probably wouldn't be looking to teach English abroad (unless I'd just left university). I now have time on my hands, an inclination to travel and a great knowledge of life to impart but I'm reluctant to invest in a CELTA course to remain unemployable at the end of it because of my 'wanting' academic credentials. Are there any countries which exercise a degree of discretion in this matter. Many thanks.