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Need help in Japanese Translation.

Spore
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Need help in Japanese Translation.

Can anyone help to translate the following into Japanese?

- connecting rooms

- hot water

- toilet

- adults

- children

- fork

seattle
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1. Re: Need help in Japanese Translation.

Try these:

Connecting rooms - setsuzoku no heya

Boiling water - nettou

Hot water – oyu; okayu (for cleaning; not rice gruel)

Toilet - toire; toiretto; benjo

Adults – otona

Children – kodomo

Fork (as for eating) – Ho’ ku, fo’ ku

Others may be able to provide improvements, especially with the connecting rooms, which I am not sure is correct.

Aoyama Dori and San...
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2. Re: Need help in Japanese Translation.

benjo may draw snickers and probably should not be used. o-te-arai (hand wash room) might be best in polite situations.

<<<Toilet - toire; toiretto; benjo>>>

Tokyo, Japan
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for Hakone-machi, Minato
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3. Re: Need help in Japanese Translation.

My grandma, an Issei who emigrated to the US in 1917, came back to Japan in the 1960's and '70's for a couple of quick tours. She had maintained her farmer Hiroshima accent, and being hard of hearing, she spoke loudly.

One afternoon at Hase Kannon in Kamakura, among hundreds of well-dressed tourists (so I thought at that time), she tugged at my shirt and spoke out in her loudest voice, "Benjo wa doko?" (Where's the "outhouse"? *polite term) I told her quietly that we don't have Benjos anymore, and now they're called "Ote-arai" (Lavatory/restroom/literally: a place to wash your hands.) She looked at me blankly and replied, "Yes, I'll wash my hands, too, but for now I need to use a BENJO." A place for bowel movements. Nope, not very eloquent or elegant for a young girl whose face turned bright red -- but good enough for my grandma. lol

In the first decade of the 21st century, "toire" or "ote-arai" would get you to your destination.

>>Hot water – oyu; okayu (for cleaning; not rice gruel)<<

Have never heard of "okayu" to mean hot water, even for cleaning. Is it a local word? Or just a misprint? "Sayu" or "O-sayu" is means hot or warm water for drinking. But I'm not sure if the younger generation would know that. "Oyu" is more popular.

Cheers!

Aoyama Dori and San...
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4. Re: Need help in Japanese Translation.

Similar story, my paternal grandparents are from Iwakuni in Yamaguchi Prefecture and they too use the term, "benjo" and passed it on to my parents who passed it on to us. I used to use the term prior to being educated quite sternly by Japanese expat friends in the early '80s that this term is totally "inaka" (country, hick, or redneck) and not used anymore. They said people will laugh at you in Japan if you use it.

When I visited my relatives in the outer reaches above Iwakuni in the mountains a few years ago I specifically asked them about this word. They said it's still in common use amongst older people in Yamaguchi but younger (under 60) are educated and schooled in "proper" Japanese and don't use the term publicly.

...sounds right?

5. Re: Need help in Japanese Translation.

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