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Food/Drinking/Transportation

Galway, Ireland
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Food/Drinking/Transportation

Hi all,

Just wondering about a daily budget in Tokyo. Plan to eat in cheap places (100YEN places etc) and also a few beers. Plan on buying a JR pass (730yen) as well so that's the transport sorted and the hotel is also booked.

Would 6-7,000 Yen be enough? Any advice from people that have been in Tokyo would be brilliant.

Thanks

Adrian

Newton, MA
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1. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

Are you omitting a Zero? You can easily eat a meal for under 1,000 yen (many places have lunch sets from 700-800 yen). Drinks tend to be fairly expensive (500-600 yen each).

The JR Pass for 7 days is about 3,000 yen. (We paid $305 USD for it last month)

Toronto, Canada
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2. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

Oldhousegirl-a JR one week pass is Y28,300, not about 3,000 yen (you must have meant about 30,000?)

Adrian-by JR pass do you possibly mean the 1 day Tokyo pass (Tokunai Pass) which is 730 yen for a one day pass? You can use that if you want, but you may want to purchase some subway tickets also.

If yes to that you can get buy in Tokyo on 6-7000 yen per day assuming your hotel is paid for and you are just doing local transport in Tokyo. Don't go into high end restaurants and bars, and you should be ok.

Edited: 04 April 2013, 00:23
Illinois
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3. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

Travel budgets - http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2410.html

In general - train passes for Tokyo aren't a good value. Stick to Suica for getting around Tokyo - http://www.jreast.co.jp/e/pass/suica.html

Philadelphia...
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4. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

Here are a couple of examples of take-out for less than 1000 yen (sorry, Trip Advisor has trouble with some Flickr links):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/76276845@N02/8617910670/in/set-72157633156619993/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/76276845@N02/8617910564/in/set-72157633156619993/

I agree, don't bother with a rail pass in Tokyo. Or the subway pass, which only covers certain line.

Edited: 04 April 2013, 00:39
London
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5. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

Another missing zero, this time from oldhousegirl. A JRPass is closer to 30,000yen.

Adrian, the 730yen Tokyo specific JRPass is not good value unless you plan to spend upwards of 3 hours on local train travel each day.

Here are some tried and tested tips on saving money without compromising your experience of Japan.

1. PLAN YOUR SITE SEEING

Start making some decisions about where you want to see and pin those onto a map of Tokyo. Before long you should have a map with noticeable clusters. Base your travel on these patterns.

For instance, one day you might wish to go to Ueno, Asakusa, Kitchen Town and then Akihabara and Ryogoku. Depending on where you are staying this itinerary might cost under 400 yen in rail fares. On another day you might start in Shinjuku and then wander down to Meiji Jingu, Harajuku and on to Shibuya, rail fare for that day might be 300yen. On another day you might want to explore Roppongi and Azabu Juban - the JR network won't actually get you here so you'd need to buy Metro tickets (again, perhaps about 400yen). The day passes for transport give you the freedom to cross cross the city on a whim but this puts you in trains for hours quite unnecessarily. There might be a day when this sort of pass makes sense, but it will not be every day.

2. Eat your main blow out meal at lunch time not in the evenings.

There are some amazing restaurant deals available at lunch time, take advantage of them. Plenty of opportunities for noodles, burgers and discount bento boxes in the evening (bento and prepared food prices are often heavily discounted at store closing time, look out for deals).

3. BEWARE THE VENDING MACHINES

Put aside some of your budget for the tempting array of drinks from vending machines but be sensible. You can satisfy some of your curiosity at 100yen stores (often have discounted versions of popular drinks or those being withdrawn from circulation) but to really save money buy the very large bottles in bulk from supermarkets and drug stores and decant them into smaller bottles to take around with you. The vending machine expenses creep up on you and can easily drain several thousand yen from your budget, keep an eye on them!

With 6-7,000 yen a day you can get by very well (I can just manage on 3,000JPY a day but the extra will make it way more enjoyable). You should definitely look at having an occasional lunch at a Michelin equivalent restaurant during your stay... Just not in the evening!

Edited: 04 April 2013, 09:50
Boston
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6. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

I would love to eat meal for 100yen...that's only $1US Dollar!

London
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7. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

The 100 yen meal, whilst rare and elusive, does actually exist.

Sometimes it is this price because it has been discounted in a store's closing hours or is part of a limited promotion.

In others, such as this example:

http://www.sekkaku.net/column/4045.html

They somehow manage to make the 100yen bento economically viable by offering the same as what has now become a standard 250yen bento but with half the amount of side dishes (and goodness knows where they are getting their rice from!).

Tokyo, Japan
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8. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

That "100 yen Meal" was taken up on a TV program as "something unbelievable." Yes, they were selling it, but it was a promo, a giveaway, a gimmick, to compete against a supermarket that was being built in the area. It was in Aichi Prefecture, out in the country.

Matsumoto-ryo, a restaurant in Hibiya Park has a 10 yen curry and rice once a year, which they donate the money to charity.

But other than those, you won't find many meals for 100 yen. Even the cheapest riceball at a convenience store costs 105 yen!

You might find "one coin" meals at lunchtime, especially during the weekday near office buildings. 500 yen for a bowl of noodles and a side dish. But it's better to plan for 1,000 yen.

As others have said, the one day pass for the train isn't worth it. You'll be riding trains all day long to get your money's worth. Just plan your destinations so they're all close to one another and plan on walking from one place to the next if you got time. You'll get to see the neighborhood, too!

London
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9. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

"Rare" and "elusive" were the key words regarding 100yen bentos.

Even if a visitor did manage to figure out how to source enough sub 250yen bento meals to feed themselves this way exclusively for the entirely of a trip, the savings would surely be offset by the costs of laxatives and other medication required to combat the inevitable consequences of such a diet (not to mention the length of time spent in fruitless frustration in commune with the ever understanding Mr Toto)

Tokyo, Japan
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10. Re: Food/Drinking/Transportation

Until April 12, Sukiya is having a special promotion for beef bowl (gyu-don). 250 yen!