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thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Gateshead, United...
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thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Has anyone been on one of these cruises, what can i expect? I know they are basic but what is the food like i am very fussy, I read that they only provide one small towel do i need to take extra towels for use in the shower apart from beach towels, Do they stop at plenty place to get off and go for a drink.

west yorkshire
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1. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

We did a mini cruise from marmaris to olu deniz 3 nights onboard sailing then 4 nights b&b, you don't get off the boat apart from to swim and they moor in secluded spots. If you want to swim, relax read a book have a drink or two it's perfect but not I could do a full week and I love boats. They are old wooden boats and though they are comfy it's not luxury it's more like posh camping! I love Turkish food salad, meat fish pasta but its not for everyone. We went on a deal last may through citrus holidays we paid £349 and we thought that was good value for everything flights transfers bags food on gulet and b&b in hotel

Desborough, United...
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2. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Take a towel to use for swimming.In the cabin you will have a hand and bath towel.The food is always fresh and includes different salads,fish and meat,rice and sometimes chips.Breakfast will be tomatoes,olives,cucumbers,boiled egg,bread and honey.Sometimes you might be really lucky and get eggy bread.Coffee and tea will be provided as will fresh orange juice but beware,the orange juice is extra.There is usually tea and cakes or biscuits mid-afternoon and sometimes savoury pastries to snack on between showering and changing for the evening and the evening meal.There might be a barbeque one evening.Alchol and water prices are higher on board than you would expect to pay on-shore.

You will have a wonderful time !!

London, United...
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3. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Heyy, Im taking my first gulet cruise alone, im 19 years old but i am abit nervous on going as i usually go on cruise ships with family and do know that men in Turkey are quite bad? Any advice? whats the Gulet cruise like? crew onboard nice? etc, Soph x

Desborough, United...
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4. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Soph,I have no idea where you got the idea that Turkish men are bad!! What do you mean by bad?They like girls and flirt but so do men all over the world.That's what men do.I have always found Turkish men to be helpful,polite and charming.They will react to you as you are to them.If you are polite and pleasant,they will be to.I think,in general,that they respect women.If you are so worried,why are you going on your own? Common sense will get you through and just don't do anything or go anywhere you feel uncomfortable.

Having said all that,you are not going to be on your own on a gullet except when you are asleep and if it's very hot,you can sleep on the deck along with anyone else who fancies a night under the beautiful stars.

It is in the crews best interest to treat the passengers well,after all,their jobs depend on it.They are very helpful,full of local knowledge and want you to enjoy the cruise so you go back again.There will probably be about 16-20 guests and crew.The crew cook all the food,lay and clear the tables,serve the drinks,clean the cabins and the boat.

A gullet cruise is wonderful,complete relaxation,good food and peace.Waking up in the morning,in an empty bay is beautiful as are all the stars at night.Take a book with you and your music,lots of suntan lotion and aftersun.Don't bother with the makeup-you won't use it.A few swimsuits/bikini.a towel for swimming,no shoes worn on board but take a pair of swim shoes for clambering over rocks or rough ground.A couple of cover-ups and something to put on in the evening.As you are on your own,everyone will look after you.

Soph,just go,relax and have fun.x

Gateshead, United...
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5. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Thanks for your input it was very helpful. Can you tell me if they stop at many places where you can leave the boat and go ashore to go to different bars at night? Do you use turkish lira on board and what sort of prices are the drinks will i need to take a lot of money.

Desborough, United...
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6. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

In my experience,the only night spent ashore was the last night and that was because we voted to go straight back to Fethiye rather than spend another night in a bay.Drinks are more expensive on board.The crew keep a tab of what drinks you have and you pay at the end of the cruise.It helps to keep your own tab,just in case of any misunderstandings.You don't really get a chance to spend money unless it's when the icecream boat or the other amusement boats are where you are anchored.Which cruise are you doing?

glasgow
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7. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Sophie,

Just to reiterate what has been said above, you shouldn't have any problem with Turkish men. I have been to turkey alone more times than I can count and have never had any problems. (Even as a young, fair skinned blonde!) In fact I find Turkish men to be more respectful than anything else.

However, that said, i have watched some women in resort drinking, throwing themselves at the men and sleeping around - and understandably behaviour like that will not gain respect from any man of any nationality!

Travelling alone, my advice would be to keep your wits about you and think about your personal safety. Drink in moderation. (Remember the measures in turkey can be huge!) If something makes you feel uncomfortable or you're not sure if its a good idea-don't do it, listen to your gut instinct. I've travelled the world alone and this advice applies to everywhere, not just Turkey!!

I'm sure you'll have a fab trip.

Norwich, United...
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8. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

I've just returned from another happy week on a gulet with Thomas Cook. To be honest, I've lost count how many times I've done a gulet package over the last 12 years - which in itself I hope indicates how relaxing and enjoyable they can be.

My latest trip was TC's Blue Cruise itinery, making the most of the last week of the season and temperatures still around 30C on very calm seas - in fact, it was only on the last day of the trip did it actually feel you were on a boat as finally the Agean got a little bit of a swell.

A quick post here as nobdy else on the boat had done a gulet trip before and it soon became clear there was a few preconception as to what was in store so I hope this will help.

Your holiday afloat will be on a traditional wooden gulet - difficult to say exactly what your boat will be like as they are all different, despite roughly being the same design. It struck me for the first time, this is actually a bit like glamping - slightly rough and ready around the edges but guranteed fun and adventure with excellent traditional, homestyle-cooked food from the galley.

When sailing out of Bodrum, Thomas Cook currently use two boats from Rota Yachting. I was travelling on the Çagatay 2. The boat itself is in need of a little updating and refurbishment, but the cabins are comfortable (if in need of much better lighting), although a little smaller than the boats used on other Thomas Cook gulet routes.

The cruise - you'll roughly follow the itinery in the Thomas Cook brochure, but this may change due to weather conditions. The main thing to note, this is not a cruise where you dock in a harbour each evening - something which I know frustrated some of the other passengers.

Personally, I'm quite happy to bob around on the sea for a week, curl up with a book and sit on the deck at night wrapped in a blanket to enjoy amazing views of the stars. If you have a need to get back to shore and explore a town's cafes and shops, this IS NOT the trip for you.

The Blue Cruise has ONE MAJOR PORT STOP ONLY , to allow for a replenishment of supplies. This tends to be near the SMALL fishing village of Sögüt. The Rota Yachting rep will try and sell you a tour for this day (I'm not entirely sure Thomas Cook are aware of this) for around €50 that will take you off to the mud baths at Dalyan, a trip down the river (used in The African Queen) towards the Lycian rock tombs (well worth a look) and a trip to turtle beach. If you don't fancy that, this is also a stop where it's a 40 minute drive into Marmaris should you be in desperate need for shopping and civilisation.

I think a number of people misinterpreted the brochure reading 'overnight stop' for 'pull into harbour and have an opportunity to get off'. An 'overnight stop' is usually a little bay where you drop anchor for the night, enjoy dinner with your fellow shipmates and make your own entertainment. The crew rarely need much encouragement to push the tables back and turn the aft-deck into a dancefloor.

Food: Simple, traditional Turkish meals cooked on board by your chef. Breakfast is a selection of bread, cheeses, olives, tomatoes, conserves and usually hot eggs of some kind. Some cruises will also offer cereal (this is down to the captain/chef). Lunch is usually a vegitarian offering - delicous salads, stews, pasta/rice dishes - and the evening meal features meat or fish (often BBQ'd on the boat).

Some people found that as the food was 'presented', rather than being able to select from a menu a little restricting. The crew however will always try to accomodate your tastes within their limted resources. If you don't like fish, you should let the captain know just after lunch as they can then prepare you something different for supper. If you're a vegitarian - you'll be in food holiday heaven.

Dessert is always some kind of fresh fruit - so if you have a sweet tooth or a craving for puddings/chocolate - make sure to stock up on biscuits etc. before you leave harbour. You might find the ice-cream boat in some places comes to your sweet tooth rescue, but be prepared to pay around £2.50 for a Magnum/Cornetto.

Drinks: The deal is, you buy from the ships bar. Forget drinking imports - because at £6.50 a drink, you'll soon be bankrupt! Each boat has bar tarrif. It's roughly £2.50 for a 33cl bottle of beer, about £1.80 for a can of sprite/cola, £12 for a bottle of wine, about 50p for a small bottle of water.

The bar bill works on a tally system - my tip, ask to see it everyday and also keep your own record. I've always found the crews to be very honest when it comes to your bar bill and the odd extra bottle of beer/wine that might appear in error can quickly be resolved. Most people tend to settle their bill at the end of the week (they'l take stirling or lira),but you can also pay as you go along if you prefer.

Cabins: They are comfortable and basic, but if you're going anytime from July-September, they'll be really REALLY warm at night. You'll have air-con for about three hours each evening from about 1800 onwards so it's a little more comfortable as you dress for dinner, but I've always found them too warm to sleep in and much prefer to grab a blanket and sleep on desk under the stars. It also a great way to wake up with the warmth of the sun hitting your face as it rises over the mountains - if you're a keen photographer, you'll already be on deck ready to capture the most beautiful sunrise.

The brochure says 'no power' on the boat - and this is because they have to write it to cover all bases. Every gulet I've been on has access to power somewhere in order to charge your phone, kindle, etc.. but this might be just a few sockets in the main cabin area rather than in your room. Plan to do without, and if it's available - what a bonus.

I think this covers the basics. If you like a cruise where you want to land every evening, the Blue Cruise is not for you. This is about enjoying a week at sea, with good traditional food, beautiful sunsets, fresh air and getting away from it all.

If you want a trip with a couple more 'getting off' and excursions then I suggest you try the Thomas Cook Lycian Cruise which runs from Fethiye (make sure to try the hamam there) to Marmaris.

For a first time gulet experience, the Thomas Cook offering is a really good way to try it - you can then of course arrange one yourself the next time through the many companies based in Bodrum, Marmaris and Fethiye. My tip would also be to try and cruise that takes you from Fethiye down towards Kas/Kalkan.

If I can help with any other info, by all means feel free to ask.

Desborough, United...
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9. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

That was an excellent report Martin B. I went on one last October and you have covered all the bases!

Norwich, United...
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10. Re: thomas cook gulet blue cruise

Thanks Carrie95, apologies now for the typos I've just noticed in my post.

One thing I forgot to add, I was asked on the last day by another passenger if the boat normally supplies towels. It's best to take one large beach/sunbathing towel with you. You'll need this to put on the sunbeds to stop suncreams etc soaking into them, a big bath towel will also be perfect for when you climb back on board having taken a dip (if you're feeling brave, by all means jump off the rail once the captain says it's OK to do so).

The crew will supply you with hand/bath towels in your cabin and these are usually changed mid-week.

And a word of warning - as with most places in Turkey - do not try to flush paper down the toilet (which might be a pump variety as you're on a boat) as this will block the system. Just place it in the little bin next to the toilet, this will be emptied each morning by the cabin boy.

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