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Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

London
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Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

Hi,

I'm travelling to Rio in September for part of my honeymoon and am finding it a little daunting in terms of which area to stay in?

Copacabanna? Ipanema? Santa teresa? Joa?

We will be spending 4 days in Rio and will want to do the usual tourist attractions, but don't want to stay in a massive hotel. We'll probably either get an apartment or stay in a small B and B type place, we're well travelled so want to find somewhere a little off the beaten track with a sense of luxury but not too far away from places to explore and go out for supper etc.

Any help will be much appreciated.

Thanks

Holly

Philadelphia...
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1. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

Look for a place in Copacabana, Ipanema, or Leblon.

Copacabana Pictorial:

http://bit.ly/1c0UWnr

Ipanema Pictorial:

http://bit.ly/13dN6Og

Ipanema: Rio’s Iconic Beach Neighborhood:

http://bit.ly/1fQlGci

Leblon Pictorial:

http://bit.ly/1b5zSbG

Leblon: Living the Rio High-Life:

Rio de Janeiro, RJ
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2. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

Joá is a hilly upscale (actually, rich) neighborhood, sort of secluded. You'll have to plan in advance your sightseeing, as the nearby Lagoa-Barra Highway is always very jammed in rush hours.

Santa Teresa is a historic district, badly served by public transportation and with constant safety issues.

Copacabana is a busy neighborhood, full of different people, from all ages, background, etc, lots of services, public transportation (including three subway stations). Copacabana has good streets and some which are sort of seedy, so it depends on where you plan on staying there. Ipanema is a trendier neigborhood, just next to Copacabana. Leblon is the following neighborhood; very residential, with upscale restaurants, but not as many options as Ipanema and Copacabana. Leblon is also considered one of the best places to live in Rio.

I would choose either Joá or an apartment in Leblon.

Rio de Janeiro, RJ
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for Rio de Janeiro
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3. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

Also consider if it wouldn't be interesting for you to make a short trip after spending some days in Rio and spend a couple of nights in a neaby beach town, such as Búzios. Búzios is way smaller than Rio, very romantic, and can be an interesting combination for your Rio trip.

Casas Brancas is probably the best known B&B over there:

tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Review-g303492-d312114…

Philadelphia...
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4. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

If you’re thinking about spending a few days away from Rio de Janeiro, you might want to consider nearby Ilha Grande, Búzios, or Paraty.

1. Ilha Grande (Big Island) is 95 miles southwest of Rio de Janeiro. The island is a largely undeveloped protected area and noted for its beautiful beaches and hillsides covered in lush tropical forests. There are no cars and no banks on Ilha Grande, so bring cash with you since not all hotels, shops, and restaurants accept credit cards. The largest village on the island is Vila do Abraão, where most of the visitor facilities are located, and can be reached from the mainland by local ferries and catamarans.

Ilha Grande Info:

http://bit.ly/oawyl

http://bit.ly/17LCAlO

How to get to there:

http://bit.ly/12mtQTd

http://bit.ly/Rq3vLX

http://bit.ly/Rq1zmt

Angra dos Reis Info:

http://bit.ly/R6xVRc

Hotels in Angra dos Reis:

http://bit.ly/1dcP4X2

2. Búzios is a beach resort with an active nightlife 105 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro with over 20 beaches in the vicinity. The beaches of the northern area of the peninsula of Búzios (Tartaruga, Azeda, and João Fernandes) receive ocean currents from the Equator, thus making these beaches warm water beaches. The beaches of the southern area of the peninsula (Geribá and Tucuns) receive ocean currents from the South Pole and are cold water beaches.

http://bit.ly/tmgdUb

http://bit.ly/bsn4UB

Clubs in Búzios:

http://bit.ly/11IE3sa

How to get there:

http://bit.ly/1ml9io

Getting around in Búzios

http://bit.ly/YT2vzV

Búzios Info:

http://aol.it/AyiuYD

http://bit.ly/11rJFli

3. Paraty (also Parati), a coastal historic town between Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, is about 160 miles from Rio and replete with picturesque cobbled streets, forests, waterfalls, islands, and an emerald-green sea.

Slide Show of Paraty:

http://nyti.ms/A4VOl3

Paraty Info:

http://bit.ly/yJYOyn

http://aol.it/HldYX6

http://bit.ly/13wnPnr

How to get there:

http://bit.ly/S86ndG

http://bit.ly/OQqE6V

Intercity buses in Brazil:

There is no one bus company that serves the whole country. See “BuscaOnibus.”

http://www.buscaonibus.com.br/en

http://www.costaverdetransportes.com.br

Bus services are often sold in three classes: Regular, Executive and First-Class (Leito, in Portuguese). Regular may or may not have air conditioning. For long distances or overnight travels, Executive offers more space. First-Class has even more space and only three seats per row, making enough space to sleep comfortably.

All trips of more than four hours are covered by buses with bathrooms and the buses stop for food/bathrooms at least once every four hours of travel.

Brazilian bus stations, known as rodoviária or terminal rodoviário, are often in pretty sketchy areas, so if you travel at night be prepared to take a taxi to/from the station.

The Rodoviária Novo Rio long distance interstate bus terminal is located five minutes away from the downtown district (Centro) in a somewhat seedy part of town, so it’s best to take a taxi there.

http://bit.ly/JEkrhY

Website: http://www.novorio.com.br/

Weather in Paraty:

http://bit.ly/NGyZIs

Hostels & Pousadas in Paraty:

(The word “pousada” comes from the Portuguese word “pousar,” meaning “to stay” and refers to accommodations such as bed and breakfasts, guesthouses, eco-lodges, inns, and sometimes boutique hotels. They are normally small, often six to eight rooms, and are usually individually owned and operated.)

http://bit.ly/VZ3tj8

4. Petrópolis. If you are also interested in a day trip, consider Petrópolis, a popular mountain resort town located about 40 miles from Rio de Janeiro.

Petrópolis used to be the summer residence of the Brazilian emperors and aristocrats in the 19th century and was the official capital of the State of Rio de Janeiro between 1894 and 1903. The town was named after Emperor Pedro I, the nation's first monarch.

Buses from Rio to Petrópolis leave daily from the long-distance bus terminal, Rodoviário Novo Rio. The Rodoviária Novo Rio long distance interstate bus terminal is located five minutes away from the downtown district (Centro) in a somewhat seedy part of town, so it’s best to take a taxi there.

http://bit.ly/JEkrhY

Petrópolis Info:

http://bit.ly/yjcSPn

http://bit.ly/w8E9W1

http://bit.ly/KVLMY7

http://bit.ly/17wKUZi

5. Another popular day trip is Ilha de Paquetá.

Paquetá is a district of Rio de Janeiro situated on an island in the middle of the Guanabara Bay. The island is an auto-free zone, so travel is limited to bicycles and horse-drawn carriages. You should schedule at least half a day to spend strolling around the island.

You can get to Paquetá by ferry, departing in the mornings from Praça XV in downtown (Centro) Rio. The ferry trip takes about one hour. You can also take the speedboat, leaving from a dock adjacent to the ferry. The first ferry departs from downtown Rio to Paquetá at 5:30 a.m.

http://bit.ly/11Cz8I2

Most of Paquetá’s houses date from the beginning of the 20th century, but there are some older constructions dating from the early 1700's, all of them well preserved. The whole island is beautifully landscaped, and because of its size and the fact that it is accessible only by boat, Paquetá is one of the safest places in Rio, with virtually no crime. It’s charming, laid-back, and a favorite spot for working-class Cariocas. Unfortunately, the water surrounding the island is polluted, so you can't really swim there.

http://bit.ly/X3s1nz

Rio de Janeiro, RJ
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5. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

If you have just 4 days, then I'd stay in the city versus off the beaten track. Rio is a fantastic city to explore. Ipanema is probably your best bet overall and you can rent an apt near the beach and within walking distance of great restaurants. It's safe to walk around at night

London
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6. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

thankyou very much for your help - much appreciated

Canberra, Australia
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7. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

We were there for Carnival 2014 and stayed in Copacabana - Windsor Plaza Hotel, and loved it. Highly recommend this hotel.

8. Re: Which part of Rio is best to stay in?

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