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Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

mxy
beijing
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Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

Are the altitudes for the two parks a problem for someone who has altitude sickness, dangerous? We would very much like to visit in mid October, but we are concerned. Do many people have problems? Hoping to hear from anyone who has had problems and how difficult can it be. Any advice, suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.....mxy11

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1. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

This is a question that you should consult your family doctor rather than at a travel forum. However, you may find this brochure issued by the Hong Kong Department of Health useful:

travelhealth.gov.hk/english/downloads/files/…

hong kong
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2. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

The altitude of Huanglong ranges from 3200-3600 metres, although you need to drive over a 4000 metre pass to get there. There are stalls with oxygen tanks if you need some.

The entrance of Jiuzhaigou is around 1,990m and goes up from there.

Altitude sickness can occur above 2400 metres.

The Jiuzhai Valley has some good information:

jiuzhai.com/language/…info_altitude.html

San Jose, California
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3. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

Huanglong is on very high altitude. Many people buy cans of oxygen to tour this park and there are many oxygen stations inside the park. Jiuzhigou should be fine.

new zealand
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4. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

have you been on thos trip yet??? I have been there, to both these places and can share some first hand experiences if im not too late

Perth, Australia
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5. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

I had been wondering about this also. I did the trip 11th October. I am no spring chicken (50+) I felt no affects in Jiuzhaigou.

I was fine in Huanglong too, just a tiny bit out of breath when I tried to hurry up steps or past others walking more slowly.

Going over the pass I was aware of a mild headache which soon dissapeared as we decended.

As others have mentioned, oxygen seems to be freely available but at no stage did I feel the need to use any.

I hope this helps anyone with a concern

Usa
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6. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

It is different for everyone, but in my experience, altitude sickness is a function of how much time to acclimate. I went to Huanglong directly from Chengdu and had a very bad case. Five days later, I was trekking at altitudes much much higher than those of Huanglong with no problem.

Edited: 05 November 2010, 18:28
new zealand
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7. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

My experince in the area is probably areally good one to use as a guide as I was part of a group of travel agents. There were 20 of us ranging from around 25 years of age to 60 years of age.We all bought the oxygen cans as a back up just in case an I used mine a couple of times as a preventative rather than a need. I woudl also add that I am in my mid 50's carrying 25kgs too much weight and had just had a bad dose of the flu so all in all I was not the best candidate for the trip.All 20 of us did the trip without much to report but one of the younger ones did suffer on the way down.She had to be taken to the first aid area at the bottom due to exhaustion. Probably she didnt think she needed the oxygen on route so didnt use it but for the minimal cost, buy it and use it. I believe the altitude effects can catch up on you like alcohol does. So out of 20 of us only the younger one was affected. Use common sense and use the oxygen. The walk is well worth the views. If you do not like chinese food and we are taking sichuan style food, take apicnic basket as the restaurant up there does not sell food as europeans know it.

Perth, Australia
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8. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

Stair climber is absolutely right. Altitude sickness can be different for individuals. In my case I had flown in from Xian and had come hot foot from the airport. I might add that I take medication for high blood pressure also.

When I compare what it was like on a trip to Tibet three months earlier there was no comparison - much milder. The group I was with then ranged from teen to seventies, we all had differing degrees of fitness. Our activities were adjusted by listening to our bodies. If you are feeling out of breath, slow down. It did get easier with time and we had given ourselves time to aclimatize.

Its always a good idea to discuss health concerns with your doctor first.

There is quite a bit of information on the subject you can read over the internet and medication which has assisted some people. I am not qualified to comment here.

I have met a number of people who have expressed concerns over A.S. and discount visiting such places as Huanglong which is breath takingly beautiful. This is a real shame. I wanted to point that I saw many far in advance of my years enjoying this amazing place and coping with the altitude just fine.

Happy traveling!

Canmore, Alberta
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for Canmore
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9. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

There is no rhyme or reason to who might be affected by altitude symptoms or sickness. Age and fitness level are not determining factors.

We had been traveling towards Tibet over a period of a couple of weeks going up in elevation over the whole way. So it wasn't like we just suddenly arrived somewhere at high altitude. I had a horrible time after landing in Lhasa, Tibet, but my husband was fine. Oxygen helped me immediately. After a while of acclimatizing we went to Everest Base Camp. I was very concerned that I would not do well. I ended up being fine there, but we nearly had to go back down in elevation because my husband was not doing well even with oxygen.

I have heard stories of smokers who made their way up Kilimanjaro with no problems and highly fit people who didn't make it.

Definitely talk to a doctor who has knowledge in this area. They will be able to advise you. We were given some medication to take with us. Do some reading on altitude sickness so you know what to watch out for.

Singapore
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10. Re: Altitude sickness in Jiuzhaigou and Huanglong

I was hit by altitude sickness when we went to Hailuogou one week ago. I have no medical condition and among my group (6 of us) I am not the oldest. The oldest was 70 years old and she was fine. I started to have a slight headache when the bus reaches campsite 2. I then vomited on the way down in the cable car.

I was the only one with a headache, the other were fine but all of us felt very breathless when we climbed up the slope. We had to stop and rest very often.