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Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

New York City
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Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Maybe I am missing something, but why would people need to hike 10 hours to La Sirena from Los Patos and carry water etc (thank goodness I finally found a map) when it appears that La SIrena is located right next to the shore. So it seems that its easy to just take a boat transfer to it. At least from La Leona's side it appears to be a short distance? It seems that one can take a boat transfer with all the necessities--even food by boat and then stay roughing it at La SIrena, taking 2 hour hikes in the morning and evening. ???? There is also a private charter option at $350 max capacity 5 people but I am leaving this aside for now as it looks a bit complicated & expensive. Many thanks.

Slovenia
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1. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Due to sea conditions, no regular boat tours from Carate/Puerto Jimenez side to La Sirena. Yet, as replied several times before (now, with a map, you might re-read your posts and replies as you will have a clearer picture), using a boat from Drake Bay is a way to reach La Sirena without hiking (and after the trail between San Pedrillo and La Sirena was closed, also the only way).

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2. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Right, last night I realized that that's what you meant when you indicated your upcoming trip to La Sirena by boat. It took me some time to understand. :) I think we could do that--transfer by boat with all the essential things with us; leave our stuff at the hotel that will take us in afterwards. I saw people sleeping on these makeshift beds on a veranda with a mosquito net--we could do that. Also earplugs and a night mask will help us sleep. I am thinking that its doable for at least 1 night, maybe 2. We even could take the food with us--ie fruits for snaks--Do they have refrigerators where I could store everything? Thanks again.

Puerto Jimenez...
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3. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

The reason people spend the time and energy hiking into the park is because they enjoy having the experience of being deep in a tropical rainforest, and seeing all the amazing things that show up on the trail, all kinds of animals, insects, amazing views of beaches, trees, ecosystems, etc, that are not seen so easily from the Sirena Ranger Station.

Sirena has two types of lodging. The first is in a shared dorm bed, with bunks and mattresses and second is open air camping on the porch, people bring their own tent or hammock for this. The park has no linen service so you will want to bring your own. There are no public cooking facilities or refrigerators for public use in the park.

Pura Vida, Ballardo

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4. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Jaguardman--the 1st paragraph of your answer totally nailed one of issues that I had in mind--whether staying at La Sirena allows the best way to experience the wilderness of Carcovado NP.

It seems that the trick to really exploring Carcovado (ie seeing its wild side in all its beauty) is not to stay at La Sirena but to HIKE to La Sirena. I think that means the 10 hour grueling hike. People that stayed at Carcovado have commented to me privately that "access to the forest is limited to along the beachfront and a single out and back trail into the forest. Given the noisy parties that were using the trail I was surprised we saw even as little as we did."

If it is what it appears to be I don't think we would be interested in staying at La Sirena. Why suffer if you can have the same access to the park from your lodge which would surely be more comfortable than La Sirena.

I have trouble imagining how people do the 10 straight hours of hiking and then staying at La Sirena with what they have brought with them during their hike (it just seems superhuman). One way to make it possibly work is for us for us to hike for 4.5 hours (someone will help us carry lots of water and snacks--fruits for electrolytes and cereal for carbs). Our stuff will have to transferred to La Sirena by someone by boat and set us up there. My understanding is that the only way to sleep is on a veranda on a makeshift bed and covered with a mosquito net--both of which will have to be provided. The linens we perhaps can borrow for the lodge where we will be staying afterwards. After the 4.5 hours we have a lunch break--someone has to provide that. After say 30 minutes of a break we continue for another 4.5 hours. I can see this working. Who can help us with this?

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5. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Another alternative explanation that I just thought about that would explain the statement made by someone the the hikes are not great around La Sirena is that they did not have a guide who could take them into the forest without necessarily following any trails. It makes sense that if there are no trails one can still rely on a guide who would know where to take you. Without a guide one would be restricted to following a path, and perhaps there is only such path at La Sirena. Thoughts?

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6. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Just read about another minus of staying at La Sirena: "[La Sirena] accommodations are not, I repeat not, for the faint of heart. Colossal Golden Orb Spiders claim this territory, so remember to shake out your sleeping bag and boots." fodors.com/news/insiders-guide-to-corcovado-…

I checked on line what those colossal spiders are--there was a photo of one devouring a bird! If that's true, and it appears to be so--no thanks! I don't like spiders period and those big ones if they get into my stuff will surely give me a heart attack. Yikes.

Canada
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7. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Please please just do day trips from Drake Bay as you have been advised many times. Save the hike for your next trip if you feel you are up to it after you have seen it for yourself. It is not a "walk in the park"

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8. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

We won't be hiking to La Sirena this time for sure.

The issue for me is to whether do the day hikes from Drake Bay after spending 1 hour and a 1/2 on boat transfer--that would make for a late start which is not great for animal observation since the animals are most active around 6am. However, it would provide for a nice lodge to return to after a several hour hike. On the other hand, I am also considering day trips from La Sirena. The obvious plus is that we will be right there and can actually enter the forest at 6 am without delay for the boat transfer. The minus is that the accommodations there are very primitive--we will have to sleep on a foam mattress on a veranda and bathrooms are horrible. Does it make sense to do it to have 1-2 hikes in the early morning into the jungle? Maybe it does. The forest is alive in the early hours of the day--5-6 am. The later it gets the less wildlife is out there to observe and creatures start hiding. That's especially true about cats who are nocturnal animals and are hunting in the early morning hours.

If I am in Carcovado once in my lifetime I would want to maximize my experience of seeing animals in the forest and having an early start at La Sirena would allow that. Additional consideration is rain in the afternoon hours of the day during late August. On one hand it means that if we are in La Sirena we will not be able to hike in the pm and also will be stuck in very uncomfortable circumstances. On the other hand, if we get unlucky with the rain, and the risk of that is high given the green season, we can always summon a boat, abort our stay and get back to Drake Bay. Perhaps with that in mind I can plan a one night stay at La Sirena--just so that we are able to do that early morning hike.

Chicago, Illinois
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9. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

A couple of years ago we spent 5 nites in the Osa, based in Drake Bay and then arranged an overnight at Sirena ranger station, arriving and departing by boat. The great part is that we were able to see an incredible variety of wildlife, particularly late in the day toward dusk when all the day visitors were gone. Our guide showed us a large number of trails and we hiked up one of the rivers to our lunch spot. (Yeah in the river - not some trail next to it). The guide made reservations for a dorm room (sleeps 6 but we had a room all to ourselves), and meals so we didn't have to carry food, and the meals were fine - nothing fancy but filling. The downside is that we also hit a rainstorm at Sirena that lasted about 18 hours, limited hiking opportunities and made it impossible to "summon a boat". In fact boat transfers are all pre-arranged. In stotm consitions boats can't land because there is no protected harbor or cove at Sirena. Basing yourself in Drake Bay allows you to combine daytrips to San Pedrillo ranger station and Cano Island with an overnight or better 2 nites in Sirena.

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10. Re: Getting to La Sirena (Other than by foot).

Thank you so much crfan. Could you please extrapolate on "allows you to combine daytrips to San Pedrillo ranger station and Cano Island with an overnight or better 2 nites in Sirena". Do you mean daytrips from Drake Bay by boat--how long does that take--has to be less than to La Sirena (1.5 hrs). The 2 nights at Sirena--we are going in late August--wouldn't it be impossibly hot in the dorms? I really don't know, but aren't there showers every single afternoon without fail? What if the weather gets so bad we can't leave Sirena because the boat won't be able to dock? Are those storms you are referring to customary in late August--the "green season"?

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