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Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Cirali / Antalya
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Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Here is the info regarding the walks in and around Cirali along the Lycian way..as you can see there is so many and much to do that actually one night in Cirali does not gicve you any time to attempt many of these walks..many walkers that spend at least a week or longer and the best walking time is March / April - end of May..and then mid Sept - Novemeber.

Ulupinar-Chimaera(Yanartaş)-Cirali: 3 hours. The walkstarts from the village of Ulupınar. Have your transportation to the beginning of the walk arranged. The village of Ulupınar has many restaurants located on waterfalls. They serve fish and other traditional Turkish dishes. If you have lunch there after, you descend to a valley, then climb up to the Chimera and down to Cirali . On this hike, you will also see a smaller group of flames at a higher altitude than the Chimera. It is relatively easy since it involves very little climbing. If you walk down from the Ulupinar village to Cirali using the Lycian Way path ( begins at Havuz Başi restaurant ) it is about 12 kms. And it ends up at the Chimaera.

Cirali-Chimaera--Ulupinar-Cirali: 5-6 hours. Starts in Cirali. On the way to the village of Ulupinar on the main road from Antalya, you will pass through Chimaera, pine forests and follow a stream with many watersfalls. This walk can be classified as medium difficult.

Cirali-Olympos-Adrasan-Cirali: 8 hours. This is the longest hike, and you should be fairly fit since it involves considerable climbing up and down the Mount Musa. It starts from the antique city of Olympos located by the beach in Cirali . After a 4-hour climb through the woods with spectacular scenery on all sides, take food and water supplies. Once in Adrasan you can take a taxi back to Cirali or a dolmus back to Olympos and then continue to walk from there back to Cirali.

Cirali-Maden Beach-Tekirova: 7-8 hours. It starts at the far end of the beach near the football field. You see the signs to Tekirova/Lycian way on the right. The path is well-marked. The hike will take you along the shoreline, up hillsides and down to beaches for about 3 to 4 hours until you reach the Maden Beach. Maden is mineral in Turkish. There were chromium mines in the old days. You still see many old mine shafts and buildings. At that point, you may retrace your steps back to Cirali or go on to Tekirova (a major touristic area), another 3 to 4 hours. In Tekirova, you can take a mini-bus (dolmus) back to the Cirali junction on the mai n highway and then from there the mini-buses back into Cirali.

Highland of Beycik-Peak of Mount Tahtali: 5-6 hours. The hike is not done during the winter months when there is snow on Mount Tahtali (January to March), the highest mountain in the region. Arrange for private transportation to the highland of Beycik and start the climb there. The most challenging of all the hikes with the most spectacular scenery of the region and the sea. Recently a restaurant/cafe has been built at the peak and there is an aerial cable car which will take you down to the main road. It is truly a breath taking ride! Once on the main road, you can either take a taxi which would have to be prearranged or use public transportation back to Cirali.

Yaylalar (Highlands): Not far from Cirali are several highlands at altitudes of more than one thousand meters. You can hike to a number of them from Cirali and arrange for transportation to take you back to Cirali. On these hi g hlands you will observe traditional nomadic living as well as now almost extinct cedar trees.

Such hiking/ walking trips are a great opportunity for photography: you can take beautiful shots of spring wildflowers from February to April. Also you can spend hours collecting wild mushrooms in November and December however you need to know which ones are poisonous and the ones that are edible. You can make many of the walks by yourselves however some walks require guides.

there is also guide available for small or individual groups

Çıralı-Gedelme

[edit]Coastal route

[edit]Çıralı-Phaselis

Total distance: 22 km

Tekirova

Phaselis — ruins of Roman city.

[edit]Phaselis-Gedelme

Aşağıkuzdere

Gedelme

Between Aşağıkuzdere and Gedelme, there are some mountain gorges, as well as a Roman bridge over a creek to pass.

[edit]Mountain route

[edit]Çıralı-Beycik

Chimaera (Yanartaş) — the "burning stones", natural bonfires on the side of the mountain caused by a natural gas seep

Beycik

[edit]Beycik-Gedelme

Total distance: 29 km

Yukarı Beycik

Yayla Kuzdere

Gedelme

Between Yukarı Beycik and Yayla Kuzdere, you'll pass just east of 2,300 mt-high summit of Mt Tahtalı, one of the mountains known as "Olympos" to ancients.

[edit]Gedelme-Göynük Yaylası

Total distance: 24 km

[edit]Göynük Yaylası-Hisarçandır

Total distance: 22 km

For the walks along the Lycian way the trails are "way-marked" with red-white paint flashes every 100m or less on trees and rocks. The Lycian Way has yellow and green signposts at the junction of the route with metalled roads. The best months for walking or hiking in Cirali are the months of April, May, early part of June, mid Sept, October and November.

For all walks make sure that you have good hiking shoes as well as a supply of water and or food . And the weather and heat depending on the month of travel can play a factor as well..be advised..

The antique city of Olympos, which was a port city, established in the 2nd century and continued to flourish until the 15th century A.D. This ancient city is situated on both sides of a brook, which dries up in the summer. The site is heavily covered with bushes and trees The ruins here are from the Lycian period up to the Byzantine times.

Olympos was used as a trading base by the Venetians and the Genoese in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, but was abandoned in the fifteenth century, in the wake of Turkish domination of the Mediterranean.

The site of Olympos is located on the banks of a well shaded stream between high cliffs. Here is a good place to study the natural wildlife of the region. The main site lines the banks of this river. The first thing you will notice are the extensive Byzantine-Genoese fortifications overlooking the beach and from each creek bank. At the base of the fort on the north bank are two recently revealed ''harbour tombs'', recognizably Lycian in form, with a epigraph translated for viewers. Further along on the south bank stands part of a quay wall and an arcaded warehouse.

To the east on the same side lie the walls of a Byzantine church. In the river itself is a well preserved pillar from a vanished bridge. Back in the undergrowth is a theatre most of whose seats have vanished. On the north bank of the river are the most striking ruins. On the hill to the east of the path looms a well-preserved marble door frame built into a wall of ashlar masonary. At the foot of the carved doorway is a statue base dedicated by an inscription to Marcus Aurelius, with the dates 172-175. East of the portal is a hidden Byzantine villa with mosaic floors, a mausoleum-style tomb and a Byzantine aqueduct that carried water to the heart of the city. Though paths have been recently cleared the aqueduct trough remains your best path for navigation.

We arrange for transportation up to the car park of the yanartaş every few nights; bus cost is 5 liras per person and the entrance to chimaera is 3.5 liras each

North of Olympos the eternal flame of the Chimaera is about an hour stroll from the Cirali village and it is possible to drive to the bottom of the ascent and walk from the car park. Tracks to the trailhead are well marked and the path ( now part of the Lycian Way ) are well trodden. The climb is most rewarding and coolest as dusk falls, since the fire is best seen at night. The Chimaera, a series of flames issuing ot of cracks in the bare hillside, is one of the most unusual sites in the whole of Lycia. It' s not known what causes the phenomenon but traces of methane in the gas can be detected. The flames can be extinguished temporarily if they are covered over but will spontaneously reignite. What is known is that the fire has been burning since antiquity, and inspired the local worship of Hephaistos ( Vulcan ), generally celebrated in places where fire sprang from the earth. The mountain was also the haunt of a fire-breathing monstor with a lion's head and forelegs, a goat's rear and a snake for a tail known as the Chimaera. The legend as told by Homer in his Ýliad relates how Bellerophon was ordered by the king of Lycia to kill the Chimarea in atonement for the supposed rape of his daughter. On the winged horse Pegasus, Bellerophon succeeded in this mission by killing the monster and dropping it into the mouth of the mountain but the flames were not extinguished. This is said to be the reason there is an eternal flame in Cirali. According to some research historians the Olympic Flame was first brought from the Chimarea and this tradition continued for hundreds of years

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Chimaera

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanarta%C5%9F

Located in the Cirali, at the north end of the village are the burning flames of the Chimaera. Known by the local inhabitants as the Yanartaş (burning stone).

It is a series of flames issuing out of cracks in the bare mountain face. It's not known what causes the phenomenon but traces of methane in the gas can be detected. The flames can be extinguished temporarily if they are covered over and then can be once again reignited. The climb is most rewarding and coolest as dusk falls, since the fires are best seen at night.

The famous myth of Bellerophontes is said to have taken place here. There is a special romanticism about this place that draws people to climb the mountain and view the natural wonders along with the evening sky.

The climb to the Chimaera is about 1 km and it is a series of wide rock steps to climb and it takes about 30 minutes depending on the individual. Closer to the flames the path will change to the natural terrain of the area.

It is not just for the fit and older people have done it. Also in the off season months of the spring and fall the weather will be much cooler making the walk easier. If one takes it slow and easy it can be done.....plus on the way up there are a few benches along the way for resting.

But if anyone has any major knee, hip or heart problems it can be risky. It can be more difficult to walk down and one MUST have good walking shoes. No flip-flops or high heeled shoes. Wear a small back pack so you can carry up some water as well.

Most important do not forget to bring a FLASHLIGHT as the path is not lit. And the best type of flashlights are the one's that you can wear on your head ( headlamp ) this way your hands are free.

Stay safe

You'll be mostly fine and safe by following the marks and keeping on trail, but there are certain things that one should be wary of.

Do not take shortcuts. Waymarks will lead you where you should be going. In fact, what may seem as a shortcut may take you to a very different direction than you should be heading.

Scorpions thrive in this hot region and stony/rocky areas —especially under the rocks— are their habitats. So never remove a rock unless you absolutely have to. Keep zips of your backpack and tent always locked. Check and shake your shoes before wearing them. Snakes are less of a concern, however be wary of them near streams.

By sweating, you don't only lose water, but you also lose sodium, which is just quite as serious as dehydration - and you will sweat a lot on Lycian Way. Pack along sports drinks (usually available in Turkish supermarkets) or fortified powdered drinks (generally not available in Turkey). Having a salty soup at the end of the day will also balance some of your sodium loss.

While you may receive a weak signal in some parts of the trail, you'll be mostly out of GSM coverage while hiking in the remote parts.

http://wikitravel.org/en/Lycian_Way

Chimaera
Geologic Formations, Nature & Wildlife Areas
Cirali Boat Trip
Scuba & Snorkeling, Boat Tours, Fishing Charters & Tours, Boat Hire
Cirali / Antalya
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1. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

bumping up for the member changemaven49

London, United...
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2. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Can you please advise where to stay when in Gedelme and Ulupinar. Thanks in advance...

Cirali / Antalya
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3. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

hi Rrayrus and welcome to the forums

check out this website for recommended accommodations

cultureroutesinturkey.com/c/…

http://wikitravel.org/en/Lycian_Way#Sleep

Gedelme
: Caner Restaurant, opposite the mosque. Indoor/outdoor restaurant with attached pension, takes groups. Excellent food, beer, can arrange transport. Contact Azem (242) 817 1053, (533) 931 6466.

I can recommend the Olympos Mountain Lodge is east of upper Beycik,

but you can also stay in Cirali and arrange for transportation. there are plenty of places to stay in Cirali

have a read in the reviews

tripadvisor.co.uk/Hotels-g311312-Cirali_Turk…

Moscow, Russia
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4. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Do you know if there is a proper road accessible by car to Yayla Kuzdere from the main road? Thank you!

Cirali / Antalya
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5. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

from the map here

wikimapia.org/…kuzdere

it looks like there is a road. how accessable by car I am not 100 % sure but check with where you are staying or inquire with the locals in Cirali.

Moscow, Russia
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6. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Thank you, Carrie

Cirali / Antalya
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7. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

hi Kirill198379,

you are most welcome

Istanbul
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8. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Thanks for this post canmom. How unbearable do you think it would be to do this in June? I want to walk part of the Lycian Way but don't get holiday until June.

Cirali / Antalya
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9. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

Hi kachika,

I really do think that trying to walk many parts of the lycian way in the month of June is not the best if ideas..however there could be a couple of the routes that are more shaded and if you do a shorter walk like the Ulupinar one and either start early in the day or later in the day they could be done.

dont forget lots of water and perhaps the highland areas would also be good..plus there are other places nearby to walk to..the vast ruins of Olympos are great for trekking around as they are in the very over grown forest so they do provide quite a bit of shade

even Cycling around Cirali in the early morning is wonderful..go down to the beach for sunrise..stunning

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10. Re: Lycian Way hiking and trekking

We will be hiking from small village Ovacik - Gedelme -Yayla Kuzdere, Cirali to Adrasan in November and would like to camp on the platue of Mt Tahtalı.

How is the camping site on Mt Tahtali and can we put up some fire overnight ?

We would also like to either walk up to the summit and take the cable down or vice versa - how far is the cable from the camping site on Mt Tahtali and any advise on the best option (up with the cable or down with the cable) ?

Thanks in advance...

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