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Area south of LA

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England
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Area south of LA

Despite having made three visits to LA over the last 10 years I know virtualy nothing of the area south to San Diego. We did make a day trip to SD on the first trip, but it was much too far for a day out and we spent most of the time in the car.

What's it like?

England
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11. Re: Area south of LA

Thanks all.

Sounds very appealing for next time.

Cool chicks in sun dresses That'll do for me Tommy.

Wooden side walks.... Is that when the (what we call) pavement is made of wood with a canopy over, like in the old cowboy films?

Yucaipa, California
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12. Re: Area south of LA

For historic and artistic links:

Not coastal, but in Orange County east of Disneyland, is the Richard Nixon Presidental Library and birthplace in Yorba Linda. President Nixon and the First Lady Pat Nixon are also buried there.

The Queen Mary has many historic exhibits and good examples of Art Deco. Both guided tours and self guided tours are offered.

San Diego's Balboa Park has a great history and beautiful Spanish style buildings from another era that house museums. Two of the museums are art museums, the smaller of the two is free to enter. There is a great natural history museum which always has special exhibits and a museum of man as well as an aerospace museum and a automotive museum, to name a few. And, of course, the San Diego History Museum. Balboa Park is also home to theaters, including one dedicated to Shakespeare, and gardens.

I won't necessarily dismiss Knott's Berry Farm and Disneyland as just theme parks. They are actually a part of the history of Southern California, with the Knott's Marketplace dating back to the early 1930's. That section of the Knott's Resort may be visited for free. Mrs. Knott's Chicken Dinner Restaurant has an informal historic exhibit on the walls as guests enter. Often there is a line and guests are able to leisurely view what is there. The Farm Market gift store has a nook in back of it with something Mr. Knott created decades ago. Across from the Market Place is Independence Hall, a recreatiion of the building where the Declaration of Independence was signed. It was a gift to the city from Mr. Knott. It houses a recreation of the Liberty Bell. And, of course, Ghost Town and its train are historic. Disneyland has the Disney Gallery, a Lincoln exhibit, and the Walk in Walt's Footsteps Tour. DL is very artistic from landscaping to attractions. The engineering is fascinating as well.

Yucaipa, California
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13. Re: Area south of LA

Speaking of Temecula, if you drive a wee bit further to Clinton Keith Road in Murrieta and follow it up the hill you will enter Santa Rosa Plateau Nature Reserve. Walk the Granite Loop Trail and you will see grassy mounds covered with huge boulders. At one point you are walking through two tall granite outcroppings. I never saw anything like it before. I combined easy day hikes there with lunch in Temecula and a walk around Old Town. I found the trail more interesting than Old Town, though.

Edited: 01 September 2011, 08:59
England
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14. Re: Area south of LA

Thanks Redlands

That area is starting to sound more and more attractive!

As a ex civil engineer ( it wasn't entirely my fault that structure fell down....I do something much more poncy now), I'm fascinated by great feats of engineering. So might go to DL just for that.

See you're from Riverside. My friend Bob was telling me there is some sort of problem there. To do with the collapse in the housing market. What's that all about?

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15. Re: Area south of LA

Laguna Beach is well worth visiting.

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16. Re: Area south of LA

Interesting to note, when the city of Philadelphia decided to restore Indepence Hall a few years ago, they contacted Knott's and asked for their blueprint, since Walter Knott built the "West Coast" version to the exact "Brick by Brick".

England
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17. Re: Area south of LA

I always thought Knotts Berry Farm was something to do with Chuck Berry

Anaheim, California
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18. Re: Area south of LA

Actually, the story about Walter Knott is about the Boysenberry. Many folks think he found/grew it, but he actually found it and restored it...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Knott

>>In the 1920s, Knott was a somewhat unsuccessful farmer whose fortunes changed when he nursed several abandoned berry plants back to health. The hybrid boysenberry, named after its creator, Rudolph Boysen, was a cross between a blackberry, red raspberry and loganberry. The huge berries were a hit, and the Knott family sold berries, preserves and pies from a Buena Park, California roadside stand. In 1934, Knott's wife Cordelia (née Hornaday, January 23, 1890 – April 12, 1974) began serving fried chicken dinners, and within a few years, lines outside the restaurant were often several hours long.<<

Alas, the original Berry Stand and the last original Boysenberry farm land was removed a few years ago to build a new Roller Coaster. At least they moved the "Church of the Reflections" to next to Independence Hall.

http://www.knottschapel.com/history/index.htm

And the church has special meaning to me, and my wife, as we were married there last year.

…ocregister.com/tag/david-michael-klawe/

Yucaipa, California
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19. Re: Area south of LA

I actually live in a little town about 15 min. north of Riverside by car and 10 min. east of San Bernardino. Riverside is the more attractive destination of the two. ; ) And I use the name if the city Redlands in my screen name because it is my favorite little city in my area (east of my home). That city focuses on the arts, music, and community events and is like a second hometown to me.

To get to the housing market collaspe question, things are rough all over. Here in what we call the Inland Empire we had a boom years back with folks moving out here as well as businesses, so I would guess that some businesses closed and people lost their jobs. Even those who commuted to work elsewhere could have lost jobs or not been able to make house payments. It is a good time to buy a foreclosed home or older home and good time for flippers. It is a bad to to sell new homes. San Bernardino has more closed businesses, more growing poverty (although pockets of better areas) and Riverside is generally thought by those out here as a better run city and nicer place to live. Don't know if that is true, just our way of thinking.

In a few months I may be moving to a rural town east of Redlands (somewhere you would pass on the way to Palm Springs). That town, Yucaipa, is doing well and thought of as a great place to live while commuting into the larger cities for work.. Still, some people who bought homes there with beautiful mountain views have had to sell short and move.

Edited: 01 September 2011, 17:10
Yucaipa, California
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20. Re: Area south of LA

Further info on the Knott's history:

Mr. Boysen worked for the City of Anaheim. More recently Anaheim began a tyoe of "Walk of Fame" near Disneyland and his name is part of that. I believe Mr. Knott's name may be or at least was nominated for consideration. You will find boysenberry goodies in various forms sold at Knott's in several locations. Boysenberry pie, cake, danish, turnovers, chocolates, covered ice cream, and jam covered funnel (pan) cakes. And, of course, jars of boysenberry jams as well as other flavors. I mix the famous chicken with the famous jam and enjoy eating boysenberry covered chicken. Interestingly, purple is Knott's Berry Farm's signature color due to the color of the jam. (I once dropped boysenberry ice cream on white pants and can attest to the fact a stain does turn purple!)

Inside Knott's original western Ghost Town area there is a museum of its history as well as exhibits of old farm equipment. Walter Knott began Ghost Town as a tribute to the pioneers of the old west and somr of the buildings were brought in from old west towns. The one that is most well preserved is the school house. The train runs through Knoott's Berry Farm is original from the Colorado Rio Grand Line and runs with either one of two engines each nearly 130 years old.

The Charles Schultz Theater in Knott's is so named in honor of the creator of the Peanuts comic strip and features ice shows during two seasons of the year. "Sparky" loved drawing while watching skaters near his home. One section of the park is dedicated to Peanuts characters.

For information on the engineering aspects of rides at Disneyland, see www.doombuggies.com for Haunted Mansion. The design of Indiana Jones Adventure is interesting too. I believe you may find a Wikipedia page on that. Some rides had to be built partially under the railroad berm there, which is fascinating.