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Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

Moscow, Russia
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Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

We are planning to hike the Kilalau trail in late January; one night camping.

I've made some research but still confused. Since it's so dangerous to leave once's car at the trailhead parking lot I consider staying at Hale Ho'o Maha B&B which is the closest (2.7 miles) affordable accommodation. BTW I wonder if they'll let us leave our car provided we are going to stay there again on our way back. Hence I'm also hoping to store our luggage with them.

Anyway this leaves us with 2.7 miles extra hiking... I don't feel comfortable hitchhiking, taxi costs a fortune. What should we do?

And here's the other even more interesting thing: getting back.

I've read that some people leave their cars overnight at the trail head making sure they're unlocked and all the valuables are taken.

Would you suggest that? If so, maybe there's no need in staying at Ho'o Maha B&B and we could look for something in Hanalei.

Water

I'm terrified of Leptospirosis. Purification tablets, katadyn, steripen and boiling altogether don't make me less nervous about it.

Is there a slightest possibility I could carry all the bottled water I need on me? That is will the reasonable quantity I'll manage to carry suffice?

Moorpark, California
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for Kauai, Catalina Island
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1. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

I have not suggestions on leving the car but "pzp" and "dave20" live on the island I would follow their advice. Most definitely....

Regarding water, my husband just climbed Mt. Whitney in CA and he took a water filter with hm which was very light weight and easy to use. I would highly recommend picking one of those up at your local back packing store (like REI).

pzp
Kauai, Hawaii
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for Kauai, Kapaa
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2. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

The only way to find out if the B&B will let you leave your car and store luggage is to ask them.

Don't leave your car at the trailhead, locked or unlocked. Bad idea.

You do know that to go beyond the first two miles of the trail you need a permit, right?

San Diego...
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3. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

Carrying several days worth of water will break your back. Especially as you will need some sort of tent/tarp in the rainy season I'd have to think. Late Jan is the heart of the winter storm period.

You might google around to see if someone is offering rides for a fee. One posted here a day or 2 back but that's banned (advertising).

California
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4. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

I would rethink possibly hiking the trail in late January.

Island of Hawaii...
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for Hilo, Island of Hawaii
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5. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

Rental car policies state that if you leave your vehicle unlocked, you are financially responsible for any damage to the vehicle, That could be quite a price tag. If you lock your car, and you have insurance, you're not responsible if the window gets broken.

My advice is to follow the requirements of your rental contract, and don't worry about trying to think like a criminal.

I always lock my car, always.

Kauai, Hawaii
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6. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

The kalalau trail , beyond hanakapiai beach, along the coast, you do need a permit. If you are going into to kalalau valley, you will be gone a lot longer than one day.......

It is two miles just to reach hanakapiai beach, on what we call the hanakapiai trail. Yes, the trail head sign will say kalalau trail, it is the beginning of the kalalau trail, but that first two miles ( that locals refer to as the hanakapiai trail is pretty safe even tho it is rocky, muddy and slippery, especially with winter rains. Actually in good weather, unattentive visitors are injurying themselves on the hanakapiai trail or walking on the rocks at hanakapiai beach, and have to be rescued.

What we refer to as thee Kalalau trail, continuing past hanakapiai beach, to the Kalalau Valley, should be taken very seriously as you will be hauling in your gear, on a narrow trail , along the side of steep cliffs, with strong winds buffeting you, and possible rain in jan.

The DLNR has been in the Kalalau valley trying to clean up the garbage heaps that the illegal long term campers leave. They just camp at one place until the garbage gets to be too much, and then move a short distance and re camp.

The DLNR has tried to apprehend these people, but they just run off into the bush.....The DLNR then cleans up all the trash and garbage, and other bad stuff so the kalalau valley will be nice for hikers with permits that haul out their trash from their temporary campsites.

As to the rental car.....I would think , good and kind and living aloha people at your accomodation would give you a lift driving you to the trail head, be sure you have those permits...it aint a game when you get aprehended by law enforcement...your troubles are just beginning.

The problem with any drop off, is getting picked back up on your return, since cell phones do tend to not get reception up there.

However, locals in their pick ups , and you standing there with your gear might stop and give you all a ride in the bed of truck with your gear. Might luck out to find a ride with someone with an extended cab.

Whoa...just thought, you are experienced hikers and fit, you could just walk back along side the road it it is only about 3 miles. Betcha if you all have a thumb out, some one will stop and pick you up.

Might make up a little sign.......that can be read by drivers, "need ride just 2 miles ) finish that with a " mahalo "

However, do check out the weather conditions, and if that trail is wet, and we have or are having rains.....good idea to rethink your plans.

Denny

Edited: 07 November 2010, 15:53
Kauai, Hawaii
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7. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

Oh, just want to add.....since I am concerned about rains in jan...that unload up on our mountains, and send rip roaring water and debri down that summer time mild stream just before hanakapiai beach.

Winter time that stream can be no longer calm, but near flash flood conditions.

Not to drive you away from your plan, but felt the need to impart some local knowledge to be aware of.

Most people do not even know about that first stream, which is two miles in, just before hanakapiai ( hana-kop-ee-eye ) beach.

Please use good judgement.

Mahalo

Denny

Wailua
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for Kauai
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8. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

A lot of these issues were discussed recently on another thread called "Trip tips:"

tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g29218-i304-k40152…

Specifically, that thread mentioned other accomodations in Hanalei. Also, use those links to check the weather and the rainfall.

For the car, I am on record saying it's OK to park at Ke'e overnight but leave nothing visible (except something like a towel drying), and in the trunk, leave only clothes and non-valuables if you have no other option (such as when you're camping elsewhere). If you'll be staying at hotels the rest of the time, you might be able to leave your bags there. Roll up your windows (because of the rain) and lock your car (for the insurance, as mentioned above). Other options include parking at Haena Beach park and campground (it has a "lighted" parking and campers and their cars almost every night--though a rainy weekday in January would be the exception), or Kayak Kauai (for a fee, though they may have a shuttle). Haena Beach park is only a mile from the trailhead.

If anyone hears of or sees any break-ins at Ke'e, let us know.

Drinking water is one topic we didn't cover in that recent thread. Carrying your water could work, since you're only going for 2 days, but you should take at least 2 gallons (8 liters = 8 kilos = 17 lbs). Even though it may not be as hot in January, it is still humid and you will sweat a lot on a long hike. I would recommend a regular hiking filter instead.

I haven't looked in to all the latest filters and UV sterilizers, but I still use a regular hiking filter (either the SweetWater by MSR now, or the PUR) plus "virus drops." Those filters are rated to 1 micron, but leptospirosis is a long, cork-screw shaped organism with a 1 micron diameter. So it could theoretically get through, so I add these chlorine drops and then wait an hour. I originally bought them with my SweetWater, but now use them with my PUR as well). Here's a link to see what I mean:

http://www.rei.com/product/671113

Some other points:

You do need a permit, but they should be easy to get in January. You can get one with a reservation online or go to the State Parks office in Lihue when you arrive.

Denny, I haven't been to Kalalau every year, but the trash is not such a problem as you imply, nor is it necessarily the hippies who were staying there. Yes, there were people camping illegally, and yes, there was some trash, and probably they were responsible for some of it. But in general, I only saw trash in certain places near the campground, and some of the hippies were helping to clean it up. You don't mention that locals, both hunters and fishermen, also hike or boat in and camp, and they don't always clean up either (which is also the case in Waimea Canyon, where there are no hippies to blame).

Frisco, Texas
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9. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

Did I miss something? I don't believe Denny ever mentioned that it was "hippies" leaving the trash.

Moscow, Russia
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58 posts
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10. Re: Kalalau trailhead transportation/bottled water

Thank you so much! It's all very helpful.

Now I'm seriously rethinking spending night there. Mostly because of Leptospirosis (I'm very prone to catching nasty stuff like this); figure I'll be able to carry that much water for one day hike.

Besides people say there's unstable situation with Miles 7-8; the path keeps eroding though it's being reinforced regularly.

Day use permits are required for any hiking past Hanakapiai but do I need one to get to the Hanakapiai falls?

Which is the return point on the trail for 1 day hike?

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