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Louisa May Alcott

Glasgow
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Louisa May Alcott

Could anyone tell me the easiest way to travel from Boston to Concord as we would like to visit the author's home

Boston
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for Boston
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1. Re: Louisa May Alcott

You can either take the Commuter Rail or drive by car. The Commuter Rail isn't very convenient for touring, as it is geared towards people who commute to Boston for work. You can check the schedule at mbta.com for the Fitchburg/South Acton line of the Commuter rail to see if it can work for you. Concord is about a half hour drive from Boston.

Edited: 22 February 2011, 21:56
Mesa, Arizona
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2. Re: Louisa May Alcott

Via Public Transportation

Orchard House is a 1.2 mile or approximately 20-minute walk from the MBTA Commuter Rail (Purple Line to Fitchburg) located on Thoreau Street

This is the website for the house:

http://www.louisamayalcott.org/

Glasgow
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3. Re: Louisa May Alcott

thank you so much we are not going till September so plenty of time to plan.

Little Women was my favourite book when I was young

Boston, MA
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for Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Martha's Vineyard
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4. Re: Louisa May Alcott

If you are coming to Boston, you can also see (not tour) a childhood home of Alcott on Beacon Hill:

http://bwht.org/tours/beacon-hill

She is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord

http://www.friendsofsleepyhollow.org/

Buffalo
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5. Re: Louisa May Alcott

I'd also suggest taking a half-hour side trip to visit the Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, Massachusetts (www.fruitlands.org), where Louisa's father, Bronson, established a commune in the early 1840s. Louisa was a little girl at the time, and the trials that she and her family (especially her mother) endured during that hard time had a strong influence on her character and lifework. It was during this time that Bronson considered leaving his family with Charles Lane, an Englishman and co-founder of the commune. Reading Louisa's journal from this time is very sad; shortly after her 11th birthday, she wrote of crying with her sister in bed as they "prayed to God to keep us all together."

The museum includes the farmhouse where the Alcotts lived with the other members of the commune. (One man was a nudist.) You can even go up into the attic where Louisa slept.

If you're interested, you might want to read Madelon Bedell's excellent biography of the family, The Alcotts, and Louisa's parody of the Fruitlands experience, Transcendental Wild Oats.

I'd also recommend Hospital Sketches, which is a slightly fictionalized account of Louisa's work as a nurse for the Union Army during the Civil War.

And while you're in Boston, stop by the Boston Common Frog Pond, where an African-American boy saved Louisa from drowning when she was a little girl.

6. Re: Louisa May Alcott

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