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Best "classic" martini

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North East
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Best "classic" martini

Not any of the new drinks in cocktail glasses but an extra dry "old school" gin martini. Straight up with olives please.

Where can I find the best one in the city of Boston?

Many thanks..

Boston...
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1. Re: Best "classic" martini

It's not a difficult drink to make and Boston is full of great bartenders.

Bond at the langham is s good start

Boston...
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for Killington
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2. Re: Best "classic" martini

I assume by "extra dry" you mean no or extremely little vermouth. That's not exactly hard to make. You can get one anywhere. Care to provide any other parameters?

Edited: 22 November 2013, 18:07
Birmingham, Alabama
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3. Re: Best "classic" martini

While on one hand they are easy to make, there are means of making them that are less than desirable. For example, I know an upscale restaurant (not in Boston) that uses a pestle to muddle the ice, gin and vermouth - leaving ice chips in the drink: AN ABOMINATION. Generally you want it shaken for a more even chill than stirred - but, that's really not a big deal.

Some will use Tanqueray if no gin is specified (or worse in some instances!) which for some reason just doesn't do it for me. Gin is a flavored spirit so the brand used really does matter. I always ask for Beefeaters- though Bombay is Ok, if a bit too light for my taste. Do not get it dirty! Gads!

I usually don't bother specifying the vermouth as there is such a limited number on the market that you will get M&R, Cinzano or Noilly Prat - all of which work fine, IMHO.

My recipe for 2:

6 shots of Beefeaters

1/2 shot dry vermouth

Shake with cracked ice. Strain into martini glass. Add olive(s)

Unwind!

Edited: 22 November 2013, 20:09
Birmingham, Alabama
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4. Re: Best "classic" martini

All of which reminds me of a lunch with my wife while we both had our martini. It was about a year ago and we overheard a 20 something disdainfully say to his date, "I don't drink fru-fru drinks like martinis!" I looked at my wife and wisely (some would say 'snidely') commented, 'He isn't old enough to have enough hair on his nads to even know what a martini really is - and God knows he couldn't drink one."

Boston...
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5. Re: Best "classic" martini

Yes, several martinis can easily separate the men from the boys.

Southern Maine
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for Maine
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6. Re: Best "classic" martini

My recipe varies a bit: Take the vermouth, roll it around in the glass, then dump it out. That is the perfect martini!

North East
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7. Re: Best "classic" martini

I too order mine with Beefeaters.. ..

Although it seems like an easy cocktail to produce, I have had many poor renditions. I just returned from Las Vegas where I had a total of five in ten days. Three were quite good, one was just so-so with too much vermouth, and one was a clear waste of time. At a cost of $12-$18, I would expect more.

Thus my inquiry to those who have imbibed in this classic in Boston. I also prefer larger cocktail glasses than those puny ones.

Boston...
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8. Re: Best "classic" martini

Well, larger cocktail glasses are not old school. If you look back at the size of glasses used even as "recently" as the '30s, they were much smaller than the big ones I think you're referring to. Also, lack of vermouth is a fairly new invention, too.

If you truly want old school, go to Drink in Fort Point, and ask them to make an 1800's martini. It's a great drink, but I will guess probably not what you're looking for.

But, it sounds like you're a local. ("I just returned from Las Vegas"...) So, where have you had good ones and not so good ones? That would help trigger other valid ideas from others.

Scranton...
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9. Re: Best "classic" martini

I will suggest to you The Last Hurrah in The Omni Parker House. I've had some great cocktails there and they have a large selection on fine liquor, and the bartenders are fabulous. The bar is very old school dark wood bar and dark leather barstools and couches. I love it! Happy planning!

Edited: 25 November 2013, 17:48
Boston...
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10. Re: Best "classic" martini

Great question. (Me, too -- old school classic martini, please!)

As someone said, you might try "Drink" although I've never been there. The bar at Nine Park is pretty respected, I believe. Since cocktails are a hot topic, I might suggest you do a Google search to see what recent articles say. Boston Magazine, as well as Boston Globe, have undoubtedly touched on this topic. Another idea would be to post this (or search it) on the Boston board of Chowhound. You'll get a lot more local food/drink knowledge there, I think.

I do think that "Bond" at the Langham Hotel is good, but have not tried a martini there.