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thanks for the mammaries

Houston and...
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thanks for the mammaries

I want to thank all of the NY Posters that helped make my first trip to NY memorable...I travelled with 6 women who all had different ideas and must-sees so I turned to this sight for suggestions from the experts...I laugh at the people with their written in stone iten's----the best part of NY to me was the flexibility and the spontanaeity of the city so CHILL people---Thanks again for all the great info...

PS: What's the deal with the braless women of NY

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Queens, New York
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1. Re: thanks for the mammaries

So, nu? Let's hear about your trip! We don't need to know exactly what you ate for breakfast, or how many times you all needed a bathroom in the middle of the day, but we like to know what you did, and give us feedback on our suggestions.

Trip reports make our lives so much easier, too. We just cut and paste a link to your report, and sound like experts!

If you give us a trip report, I MIGHT reveal the secret about the "braless women of NY".

2. Re: thanks for the mammaries

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brooklyn, ny
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3. Re: thanks for the mammaries

Those bralees women must have been tourists or perhaps they feel that motther nature was not too generous. I see some pretty nasty types boarding my subway cars at Soho stations. They all look like they need a shower and clean underwear, gross.

Queens, New York
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4. Re: thanks for the mammaries

There is a long history of NYC female gang members using supports from bras and corsets as weapons. The controversy over this grew into disdain for such bindery, and led to the popularity of soft-cup foundations.

During the early 1800s, women in the "Gangs of New York" period, helped their men fashion shivs out of whalebone corset stays. An infamous woman named Vicky Bryce was a notorious "house leader" who had a clandestine factory in her home on Pearl Street for this purpose. Women of all classes sought her out. Ladies who needed to defend themselves felt that their best defense was learning about "Victoria's Secret."

Just as "The 21 Club" was originally an illegal speakeasy, we can see evidence of the underground corset-bone trade today in legitimate businesses of some older areas of New York (for example, the Lower East Side took this market and ran with it - leading to the myriad of corset and bra stores we see on Orchard Street today.)

The "Flapper" look in the 1920s was heralded as freedom from binding corsets, but also a turn toward more civilized, non-violent dress. Unfashionable and poorer women who still wore corsets and bras were suspect - these Philistines could whip out a concealed shiv at any moment, if you looked at them the wrong way!

The police began to hire women as undercover cops and infiltrate these areas where women still wore corsets. The female officers would dress like them to blend in (aka "wear a wire") in the hopes of being accepted and finding out information.

Looser and unbound women were considered more friendly and non-threatening. They had "nothing to hide" so to speak, and didn't mind who knew it.

Combined with police crackdowns, the decline of whaling and the advent of Spandex, full-figured support fell out of favor. Although the original intent of portraying a peace-loving, non-violent demanor is lost, NYC women carry on the tradition today.

mulva5 - you owe me a trip report.

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New York
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West Palm Beach...
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5. Re: thanks for the mammaries

Wonderful, QB!

Scotland
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6. Re: thanks for the mammaries

My God, what a knowledge you keep in that head of yours.......

Newark, Delaware
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7. Re: thanks for the mammaries

My husband would be all for the "burning of the bra" syndrome. That is, till he saw what the results would be after prolonged "lack of support" (& not in the monetary or emotional way mind you). Especially for the more well endowed. It has been hot this summer though!! LOL

(o)(o)

Brooklyn, New York
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8. Re: thanks for the mammaries

QB - fascinating - however you fialed to mention the political statements inherent in going braless in the 60's - as an escape from a fundementally paternalistic society. After all - the bra and corset were both invented by men. As was the garter belt (M. Eiffel)

brooklyn, ny
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9. Re: thanks for the mammaries

QB,

Very impressive, I just thought that being braless for some women meant that they are desperate for attention, but according to you it is a political statement!

Since you are a wealth of knowledge, fill me in on a cheap places to gas a car in Queens.

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Queens
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Brooklyn, New York
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10. Re: thanks for the mammaries

Bette Midler does a skit about him, Otto Tittslinger (sp?) the bra inventor.