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New Little Italy?

Detroit, Michigan
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New Little Italy?

Been reading about how there is little to see in Little Italy (no pun intended). Is there a new "Little Italy"? We were so looking forward to it; probably wouldn't eat there, just browse and walk.

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New York City, New...
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1. Re: New Little Italy?

it's not "new" but Arthur Ave in the Bronx. What is newer in that neighborhood (which is the blemont section of the bronx) is the influx of the Italian's Adriatic neighbors, the Albanians, and that's worth checking out as you are unlikely to find an Albanian concentration anywhere else (in America).

New York City, New...
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2. Re: New Little Italy?

oops...that's Belmont, not Blemont

Queens, New York
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3. Re: New Little Italy?

Hi would go to the bronx to eat and buy. ...

http://www.arthuravenue.com/index.jsp

Here is a thread to look at

tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g60763-i5-k1301208…

New York City, New...
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4. Re: New Little Italy?

What about Bensonhurst/Bath Beach/New Utrecht/Dyker Heights in Brooklyn? Is that still a good Italian neighborhood, restaurants?

I know that is a prime area, but I don't know about restaurants/shops?

Queens, NY
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5. Re: New Little Italy?

Those are definitely Italian neighborhoods, but they're lousy for tourists because they're so spread out. There's no tight little shopping strip of a few blocks - businesses are scattered over a pretty large area.

QQ2
New York City, New...
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6. Re: New Little Italy?

Bay Ridge is a good area in Brooklyn for restaurants, and not just Italian ones. But keep in mind that that it has been many years since Italian immigrants huddled together in inner-city neighborhoods, creating authentic festive enclaves suitable for tourist strolls. They have moved onward and upward to outer boroughs and suburbs and assimilated into the larger society, like groups before and after them.

These days you are probably better off just going to Italy. If that's not possible, then there's always Disney World and Vegas -- don't they have Italian-themed attractions?

New Orleans...
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7. Re: New Little Italy?

If you're looking to browse and walk, you won't do better than Belmont. The area has a very high concentration of excellent specialty food shops, and you'll find locals doing their regular grocery shopping every day of the week minus Monday, when most stores are closed.

As mentioned though, it's not exactly new.

New York City
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8. Re: New Little Italy?

The idea of ethnic neighborhoods is that they are places where recent immigrants cluster. As it so happens, though, there has been relatively little immigration from Italy over the last generation or two, and those immigrants who have come tend not to be the poverty stricken and uneducated Italians of the past who felt the greatest need for living in a community where one did not have to speak the local language, eat the local food, or observe the local customs. Such Italian immigrants as one will find today will probably be conversant in English, will dress like everyone else, and will not find hamburgers or Coca-cola to be exotica. Meanwhile, the great-grandchildren of the dirt poor Sicilian and Neapolitan peasants who once filled Little Italy are now doctors, university professors, and Supreme Court justices who do not feel any obligation to continue living on Mulberry Street speaking broken English and haggling loudly in a market over the price of sausages merely to provide "Italian" color for the benefit of tourists.

If one wants immigrant neighborhoods, though, they are certainly still to be found in abundance in NYC. We have Russians in Brighton Beach, Egyptians in Long Island City, Greeks in Astoria, Poles in Greenpoint, Koreans in Flushing, and every kind of West Indian in East Flatbush. There is even a Liberian community in, of all places, Staten Island. While lively ethnic enclaves today, though, it is as likely that in a generation or two the children and granchildren of the immigrants in those neighborhoods will also "Americanize" and move on, just as the Italians of Little Italy, or the Germans of Klein Deutschland (ever hear of that one?) did before them.

Central Village...
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9. Re: New Little Italy?

Kleine Deutchsland - wasn't that Yorkville 86th 2nd Avenue nabe???

Brooklyn, NY
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10. Re: New Little Italy?

There are several Italian areas in NYC ..... including Bensonhurst (B'klyn), Arthur Ave (Bx), Corona (Queens) ..... and a pocket of Italians in Williamsburg B'klyn. But if you happen to be in NYC this weekend here's a suggestion for a truly unique Italian/NYC experience.

The 122nd annual lift and dancing of the giant 'Giglio' at the opening of the Feast of St. Paulinus and Our Lady of Mt. Carmel ..... at 1:00 on Sunday July 12th (take the 'L' train to Lorimer Street station and then walk three blocks over to North 8th Street near McCarren Park)

http://www.olmcfeast.com/

www.giglio-usa.org/Brooklyn_Mt_Carmel.htm

There's Italian music, Italian food and 100 Italian men will lift a 3 ton 65 foot statue of our Lady of Mt Carmel lead by a 'Capo'.

This is real old world Italian tradition at it's best.