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Pancake question

Sheffield, UK
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333 posts
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Pancake question

This might be a strange question, but one that has always intrigued me. I've noticed, particularly in diners, that pancakes are served both as a sweet breakfast - with berries and other fruits, and also as a savoury, with sausages and eggs. Both look delicious - but what's the "usual" or "traditional" way to eat them at breakfast?

And what's the distinction between a stack and short stack.

FYI - in my neck of woods, pancakes are much thinner and served with gravy and stewmeat!

Brisbane, Australia
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1. Re: Pancake question

99% of the time I have only ever had them with sweet toppings.

I have had them once before with bacon though.

My girlfriend was a little put back when I told her I was going to try Chicken and Waffles at Amy Ruth's.

I have noticed on their menu you can get it plain or with gravy. Do people put maple syrup on if they order plain chicken and waffles?

Brooklyn, NY
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2. Re: Pancake question

It's not that they're served sweet or savory, the pancakes are always treated as a "sweet," since syrup is traditionally served with them regardless of what's on the side. It's just that you can have your sweet pancakes with fruit, or you can have them with eggs and sausage (or both). And the pancakes themselves, like waffles, aren't inherently sweet. I actually don't like syrup on my pancakes, I prefer just butter.

The different sized stacks are exactly what they sound like - a short stack has fewer pancakes in it than a regular stack. The exact number depends on the place, but I think of a short stack as something along the lines of two or three pancakes, and a regular as somewhere between five and seven.

Woodbury, New York
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3. Re: Pancake question

its normal to have them with meat AND syrup :-)

I have them with bacon and syrup.

Woodbury, New York
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4. Re: Pancake question

good lord they do things strangely in Sheffield! Pancakes with gravy?!! And I have no idea what stewmeat is, I don't think I want to know ;-)

In the UK, the thin pancakes are great, preferably with lemon and sugar! I prefer 'em to be honest, to the US version of pancakes. But they are good too, as is French toast.

Sheffield, UK
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5. Re: Pancake question

I think it's a Yorkshire thing - or maybe even more local than Yorkshire. A bit like the traditional way to have Yorkshire pudding separately before the roast. Harks back to when those foods were used to fill stomachs when folk couldn't afford meat. Stewmeat is just diced stewing steak, only eaten with pancakes or chips instead of in a pie. Good honest comfort food.

Woodbury, New York
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6. Re: Pancake question

I'd heard of the yorkshire pudding thing before, eating it to fill people up! Makes sense :)

I like yorkshire puddings!

Queens, New York
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7. Re: Pancake question

Sweet and savory items on the same dish seems to be more common in America than the UK, from what I've gleaned on this forum.

We also revere our chocolate-covered salted pretzels, roasted turkey with cranberry sauce, pork chops and apple sauce, and the classic peanut butter and jelly sandwich!

Remember, we invented Cracker Jack and PoppyCock - both are caramel covered popcorn with salted peanuts or chocolate.

Stamford...
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8. Re: Pancake question

Like Brooklyn Bridge said, they're "sweet", although not really all that sweet. I put butter on mine and sometimes a sprinkle of sugar. If served with bacon, eggs, whatever, they're a sweet side next to a savory just like baked apples with roast pork or cranberry with turkey.

I'm over forty and I've never seen anyone put bacon on top of their pancakes and pour syrup over (difficult to eat that way, I imagine), much less gravy and stew meat. I've got to get a wider circle of friends.

Woodbury, New York
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9. Re: Pancake question

But is the Cranberry coming out of a can QB? :-D

I was very amused last Christmas (first I spent in the US), with the canned Cranberry! Never had it before!

Pork and apple, turkey and cranberry (usually from a glass jar!), are traditional in the UK too, heck, gammon steak and pinnaple is pretty popular too.

New York City
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10. Re: Pancake question

Most Americans would have no idea what a Briton means by referring to a dish as "sweet" or "savory"; indeed, the word "savory" does not form any part of the vocabulary of most Americans other than as a synonym for "tasty" or "delicious." The idea that a meal has to be one or the other would strike an American as very odd. It would be perfectly natural in the US to have waffles, or pancakes of any kind (including fruit pancakes such as blueberry or banana) topped with maple syrup served along with sausage and bacon at the same meal. It would also be very odd to an American to hear that one was expected to refrain from pouring syrup over pancakes or waffles simply because there was also ham, or bacon, or sausage, or scrapple, or whatever on the plate at the same time.

Fried chicken and waffles, by the way, is a southern thing; as a New Yorker I find the idea odd, but you might try asking on the Atlanta forum for a different region's insight.

Edited: 02 December 2011, 23:30