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Subway at night

frh
Dallas, Texas
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Subway at night

We will be 2 ladies traveling at night on the subway. I understand it may be safer to ride near the conductor. Is there a way to know which car that is and is an area on the platform to stand marked that the conductor's car stops at?

New York City, New...
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1. Re: Subway at night

The conductor car is usually in the middle of the train. You will see them in there when they ride into the station. There is also a train operator in the front car.

However, I really think you have nothing to worry about. Every night subway ride I have taken has been just as crowded if not more so than the daytime.

Edited: 05 February 2012, 22:21
New York City, New...
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for Madison
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2. Re: Subway at night

You might want to read through the post on safety in NYC. You'll feel better.

Pam

Stavanger, Norway
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for Western Norway, Stavanger
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3. Re: Subway at night

The Subway is safe! I'm a solo female traveler, and I've taken the subway in NYC At night many times by myself. Never felt unsafe and I have never thought of being near the conductor.

Edited: 05 February 2012, 22:24
New York
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4. Re: Subway at night

I was on a train at 1:30 AM on Friday night (by myself) and there were no seats available - it was that full. I'm female and often on my own on the subway, and I've never had any problems. It's safe day or night.

New York NY
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5. Re: Subway at night

The biggest thing you have to worry about on the subway is actually almost always wearing a uniform.

Subway crime is so ridiculously low, you really don't have to worry about any of the nonsense you've seen on TV.

Crime is so low (for real) that the police really don't have very much to do. In order to keep them busy (and generating some revenue in the process), this is what you're more likely to encounter.

Yesterday I was coming home from grocery shopping and five officers had this well dressed young man who looked like a college student (he had some books) - five cops and one young man. What happened? He spit his gum into the track bed. Now I'm not suggesting that is lovely / appropriate behavior and I'm not suggesting we want to encourage people to spit gum into the tracks but I do question whether five officers really need to write a student a summons for it.

Here's a New York Times article about all the tickets the officers are writing, particularly late at night and on the weekends.

nytimes.com/2012/…

Brooklyn, New York
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6. Re: Subway at night

The crime rate in Dallas is much higher than NYC. You are much more likely to be a victim of crime where you live

frh
Dallas, Texas
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7. Re: Subway at night

Thank you. I do feel better about riding at night.

New York City
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8. Re: Subway at night

Putting aside the habitual anti-police sneers of MoreFFmiles, who cannot possibly know the details of an incident that he did not witness, but who cannot resist getting a dig in at the NYPD under any pretext, let us look at some facts.

It might interest you to kjnow, frh, that crime is actually LOWER on the subway at night. Last year, an average of seven felonies were committed daily on the subway system; there are also 5.2 million riders each weekday. Of the felonies that are committed, a disproportionate number are thefts commtited by high school students against other high school students (which is why crime drops in the evening: the high crime hours are 3pm to 8pm, when high school students are going home.). Roughly half of the recorded felonies are thefts of personal electronics (cell phones, iPods, etc.), typically as snatch-and-run grand larcenies. The next most common group of felonies are theft-from-the-person grand larcenies in the form of pickpockets or bag openers -- which is a crime that is as likely to happen in a supermarket or a shopping mall in suburban Dallas. However, what you are worried about are robberies, which are thefts committed by force. If you are not a high school student travelling during school dismissal tyimes, your chances of being a victim of a robbery on the subway in New York City on any given day are roughly 1 in 8 to 10 million. To put that in perspective, every day in Dallas there are on the average 32 vehicle accidents that result in an injury to someone, and the population of the city of Dallas is 1.2 million people. This means that on any given day the chance that a Dallas resident will be involved in a motor vehicle accident that produces an injury are 1 in 37,500. This means that on any given day you are more than 200 times more likely to be involved in an injury-producing motor vehicle accident in Dallas than an adult subway rider in New York is likely to be robbed. But are you afraid to drive at home?

Still, if you would like to ride with the conductor, there is a simple way to do this. In the middle of the platform, look for a striped black-and-white or black-and-yellow board hanging from the ceiling. This is the "conductor board", and the conductor's position will be there when the train pulls in.

Edited: 06 February 2012, 00:20
New York NY
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9. Re: Subway at night

As GWB, our contributor with close connections to the inner workings of the NYPD, has reinforced, the subway is safe.

As the New York Times article I provided the link to, the safety does come at a price many of us are willing to pay (but I feel it is worth being aware of).

My mother grew increasingly terrified of riding the subways in the 1970's with all the knifings and armed robberies. You didn't need to ride at night to get robbed or mugged - it happened at mid-day and on your way to a pre-theatre dinner in broad daylight in the spring and summer.

It is the complete opposite these days. But, as somebody who appreciates a deeper understanding and somebody who asks how come and why, I like to share...

One thing GWB and I will never see eye to eye on are things like whether it is appropriate to write a summons to a well-educated professional in business attire who is on their way to work and is walking through a city park enroute to their nearest subway station at 5:55AM in broad daylight on an early summer morning when the sun rises at 4:30AM simply because the professional didn't look at their watch - you can't cut through a even a small (tiny) city park between Midnight and 6:00AM.

One of our regular contributors is an attorney who had to take time off from work for finishing a jog in a park just a couple minutes after the posted closing time.

GWB believes the law is the law and that is that. I believe law enforcement should have some common sense. I guess we have to agree to disagree.

New York City
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10. Re: Subway at night

MoreFFmiles is correct. While it appears that there are those who think that the only people who should be required to obey the law are the poor, the disadvantaged, people who do not have college degrees, members of the working class, minorities, or those who are not well dressed, I am not among them. I do not think one's obligation to obey the law is abrogated because one went to an expensive prep school, or because one is wearing expensive clothes. Perhaps it is my own working class background that leads me to be so unimpressed by such things, which other people clearly consider of supreme importance in judging the question of whether all members of a community should or should not be treated equally by the police.