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wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

London, United...
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wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

Hi all

I am coming to NYC Manhattan in September .

I was told that it will be better for me to use the buses rather than the subway as not all of the subway stations have lifts for wheelchairs - is this true ?

If so - do all of the buses have ramps ?

I understand that the payment for the bus is only done by buying a metro-card - NOT CASH- is there a metro card for a day / two days or only 7 day card ?

When can you buy a card ?

I sw on the internet that there is such a ting as a limited stop bus ? LTD - what does that mean ? I cant seem to see the difference in the stops ..... foe example the M2 bus from Time square to Guggenheim museum suddenly from 6:30 in the morning it is noted on the schedule that limited stop service begins

Also is the name of the bus "M2" ?- because it is written on the internet site :

Take the LTD WASHINGTON HTS BWAY - 168 ST bound M2-LTD

WHAT DOES THAT MEAN ? ( ITS MY FIRST TIME IN NYC )

THANKS

Brooklyn, NY
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1. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

Yes, most subway stations do not have elevators. All city buses are wheelchair accessible: they have wheelchair lifts, rather than ramps. You can buy a Metrocard in any subway station, or at list of vendors. If you go to the MTA website, they have a list of Metrocard vendors. (I can't link from my phone.)

You CAN pay cash on the bus: it's $2.50 per trip, payable in exact change in coins only. You can get up to one free transfer to another bus with each bus fare paid in cash. A Metrocard will get you fare discounts and an easier transfer. The shortest unlimited card is the 7-day card for $30 (plus the $1 card fee). If you plan to take 13 bus or subway rides, that's your best deal. If not, the pay per ride card give you a 5% bonus on amounts over (I think) $10. Then you don't have to carry rolls of quarters to pay the bus fare.

LTD top service means the bus only stops at major stops, and skips others. It's a way of speeding up service for most people, like an express train. The MTA website should have a listing of which stops are limited service stops and which are not. The bus will say "M2" on the front sign, and will say LTD if it's a limited stop bus. Otherwise, it's making all stops.

Queens, NY
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2. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

BB is right. There are many disabled people in New York, and buses are how they get around. Every single bus has a wheelchair lift, and I see people in wheelchairs on the buses often. You can be guaranteed that if you take a bus, it will be accessible. Relatively few subway stations have elevators, so stick to the bus for most trips.

The rest of BB's message is correct, too. If you want an easily wheelchair accessible place that sells Metrocards, you can buy them at the newsstands at the airports, or at Grand Central Station, where the main floor is wheelchair accessible. You can also just bring a roll of quarters or dollar coins (you can get them at a bank) and pay the $2.50 cash for each trip. Just remember, it must be exact change in coins - the drivers don't take bills or make change.

Here's the map of how you'll be getting around:

http://www.mta.info/nyct/maps/manbus.pdf

Brooklyn, NY
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3. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

Also note that the bus "schedule" is not an exact science(same as the subway.) The bus/subway can run late due to traffic/weather or general delays.

NYC/Israel
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4. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

Once you get on the bus there are areas that are assigned for wheelchairs. The seats there fold up and there is a way to fasten your chair so it doesn't roll. Passengers in those seats KNOW they must get up and if you are unsure how to fasten your chair--ASK the driver. After the first time, you'll be an expert. Note: there are a limited number of places for a wheelchair so theoretically, although I've never seen it happen, a bus could be "full" and you'll have to wait for the next one.

NY NY
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5. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

The driver always fastens the wheelchair in, no need to ask. At the same time, they'll ask where you're getting off, so they'll know to pull up right against the curb at that stop. Also, some of the newer buses do have ramps rather than lifts. Either way, it's an easy way to get around the city.

New York City, New...
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6. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

I've discovered there are usually youtube videos for most things- some better than others. Here's a short one so you can see the hydraulic lift the buses have. Forget the ducks at the beginning.;)

m.youtube.com/watch…

I would suggest you avoid rush hours 8-9 am and 4:30-6 pn mon- Fri if you can when the buses are most packed.

I ride the buses frequently and often see people getting on and off in chairs. The driver usually gets out of his seat and helps including putting down a seat to make room for the chair in the bus. Here's a link to the accessibility section pn the MTA website. You're likely entitled to a reduced fare metrocard but it may require more riggamaroll than it's worth.

http://www.mta.info/accessibility/transit.htm

Astoria, New York
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7. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

BUSES The way you get on depends on the age of the bus. Older buses have a lift at the back door. Newer buses will have a ramp at the front door as shown in the you tube video above. All city buses are equipped, and the driver will assist in getting your chair locked into the wheelchair location. The driver will probably also ask where you are going to get off. Buses stop about every two or three blocks. Buses marked "Limited" make fewer stops. (Express buses are suburban buses that will be of no use to most visitors)

SUBWAYS There are a limited number of subway stations with elevators which are marked with a wheelchair on the map. http://www.mta.info/maps/submap.html (I'd try to include at least one non-rush hour ride while you are here as it is a part of the NYC experience.)

The link to accessibility info. that was given above provides good info. about riding both subways and buses and is probably worth a read before you come.

METROCARDS As noted above the break even point on a "one week unlimited" is about 13 rides for one person. web.mta.info/nyct/fare/FaresatAGlance.htm Otherwise, there are pay-per-ride cards. The application process for a reduced fare card is not really practical for a visitor.

Be aware the the Roosevelt Island Tram is also included in the Metrocard. It is wheelchair accessible and an interesting view. …wikipedia.org/wiki/Roosevelt_Island_Tramway

TAXIS If your have a folding wheel chair and are with companion it is easy to use a regular cab and just put your chair in the trunk. But also be aware of this program http://www.accessibledispatch.com/ There are a smallish number of fully wheelchair accessible yellow cabs. This program lets you call one to your location (in Manhattan ONLY for now, as it is a new program.) The cost to you is the same as any other yellow cab. (The driver receives an incentive from the program and has training on loading the chair, etc.) If you need a cab in the Times Square area I recommend using the taxi line at the Mariott Marquis during busy times.

THEATERS Be aware that, since some of the theaters are older and very difficult to retrofit for wheelchair access to the balcony, many sell wheelchair accessible seats (with a discounted companion seat) at substantial discounts timessquarenyc.org/broadway/…index.aspx

Also be aware that at some places the accessible door may be to the side. If there are steps at the entrance and there is not a sign directing you to the wheelchair entrance, have your companion get the attention of the staff and they will direct you. Anyplace newer will have to be accessible by law, a few older establishments (such as ones in old brownstones, etc.) will be exempt.

TOILETS Again, newer places will have accessible ones. In larger places it will be within the ladies room. In some places there may be a separate handicap one.

London, United...
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8. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

Thank you all very much !!!!!

All of your info was really helpful - Cant wait to get to NYC

There is one thing that I didnt understand - Pay per ride METRO CARD - from what I understand - it costs 5$

How many rides are in one card ? Do you have to fill it up every ride ?

New York City, New...
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9. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

The smallest denomination metrocard you can buy is $5 which gets you 2 rides. But it makes more sense to get morevthan that since you get a discount for any amount over that. The 7 day unlimited is really the best value for $30.

www.mta.info/metrocard/mcgtreng.htm#payper

Astoria, New York
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10. Re: wheelchairs on a bus - HELP

For a pay per ride card you can purchase various amounts from $5.00 and up, keeping in mind that a fare is $2.50/ride, so purchase in multiples of $2.50 depending on how many rides you anticipate. (And there is a "bonus" which adds a bit - see link below) If you do use a pay per ride you can share it with up to a total of 4 people and avoid paying more $1.00 card fees. (If you share a card and make a transfer the card will "remember" the transfer for all of you for two hours.)

Machines to refill will be harder for you to get to as they are located in subway stations, if you might get close to the break even point of 13 rides/person, the convenience of not worrying about refills by getting a 7 day unlimited may be worth it. (And if your unlimited card still has days on it when you leave consider giving it to someone at your hotel.) Newsstands and other vendors cannot refill cards. Here is a comparison chart that can help you decide. http://www.mta.info/metrocard/compare.htm

From the MTA: http://www.mta.info/metrocard/mcgtreng.htm

"Buy as many rides as you want:

At a station booth: from $5 to $80*

At a MetroCard Vending Machine: from $5 to $100*

Put $5 or more on your card and receive a 5 percent bonus. For example, a $20 purchase gives you $21 on your card. Refill your card to use the balance.

You get an automatic free transfer between subway and bus, or between buses."

Please advise if you have any more questions,